Hardy Clownfish Tank Mates??

stella1979

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Firefish are very timid by nature and I don't imagine one would do well with a known aggressor like your clown.

It may be that your clown has established territory over your entire tank so may be quite unlikely to allow any other fish in. This is just one of the reasons that we should always stock tanks starting with the least aggressive and ending with the most. So, if you will be adding another fish, I highly recommend that you have a back-up plan in mind. This might involve a little time-out for the clownfish if you have another container he could safely spend some time in while a new fish acclimates to the tank. Orrr, you might have to just pay very close attention and be prepared to remove and return the newcomer to prevent the murderous intentions of your clownfish. And... speaking of another container, I imagine you know that it is very highly recommended that you quarantine any new fish to prevent bringing illness to your established tank. This is even more important if you keep inverts or corals as these critters are not tolerant to medications.

Okay, so, one to suggestions... A goby might work and perhaps you'd like to witness the symbiotic relationship between pistol gobies and pistol shrimp. There are a few fish and a few shrimp species in this group. Personally, I have a yellow watchman goby paired up with a Randall's (or candy stripe) pistol shrimp. These critters are bottom dwellers which will not spend a lot of time out in the open, which may not seem ideal, but because they will occupy a different space in the tank than your clown does, this may just be the right choice.

Otherwise, you'll want to go with a fish that also has a little attitude. I might consider a Royal Gramma or dare I say it... a Dottyback. Dotty's are mean, mean, mean, and you should know that most, (including myself) would not recommend them without a very large tank (to offer more territorial space and spread aggression), or as the single fish in a small setup.

I'm sorry that you've fallen into the trap that gets a lot of us when we're new. Not to be negative about clownfish (I have one and love him) but we are so exposed to these guys and many start their first salty tank, throw in a clown, then cannot add other fish due to the clown. Hopefully, I've given you good information to get started down this road and you will know that you must tread carefully. Good luck!
 

Magicpenny75

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I would be interested to know more about the clown that was killed. Was it the smaller of the pair? Clowns don't always pair automatically. They are all born male, and when two pair off the larger one will turn female. Once this happens, they can't change back. You can possibly add another juvenile that hasn't had a chance to turn yet, and she *may* accept him and pair off. When it happens it is really amazing to see them together. I have had a couple of pairs that really took care of each other like they were in love. If you have one alone for any length of time you can almost guarantee it is female now.
If you don't want another clown, consider an invert tankmate, like a skunk cleaner shrimp, a fire shrimp. a halloween hermit crab, or just get a really big frilly mushroom and watch your clown enjoy it.
 
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Sierra s.

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I would be interested to know more about the clown that was killed. Was it the smaller of the pair? Clowns don't always pair automatically. They are all born male, and when two pair off the larger one will turn female. Once this happens, they can't change back. You can possibly add another juvenile that hasn't had a chance to turn yet, and she *may* accept him and pair off. When it happens it is really amazing to see them together. I have had a couple of pairs that really took care of each other like they were in love. If you have one alone for any length of time you can almost guarantee it is female now.
If you don't want another clown, consider an invert tankmate, like a skunk cleaner shrimp, a fire shrimp. a halloween hermit crab, or just get a really big frilly mushroom and watch your clown enjoy it.
If I got another clown would it need to be smaller than the one I have now?
The one she killed was the same size as her and I bought them together,they were fine for a while but then I guess as they got older she stressed him out so much fighting for dominance that he just died.

I have had a velvet break out a while ago but now ready to add fish. I have one clownfish that survived,she is super lonely and she needs a friend.
I've thought about another clown for her but not sure on what else I could put with her.
I've also thought about a tailspot blenny??

I know I'm limited since it's a 15 gallon but I would like to have more swimmy fish instead of just one lol
 

stella1979

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Yes, your best chances are with a smaller clownfish. It doesn't seem right based on the fact that the new clown may need strength to put up with the current clown... but due to the natural hierarchy that occurs within the species, your (now female AND boss) clown will be more likely to accept a smaller fish as her mate. Just keep in mind that pairing clowns is not an always successful process and there's still a chance she'll accept no one, so advice to tread carefully and have a backup plan in place still holds. Any chance you have a breeder box so you can safely introduce them for a while before real exposure?
 
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Sierra s.

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Yes, your best chances are with a smaller clownfish. It doesn't seem right based on the fact that the new clown may need strength to put up with the current clown... but due to the natural hierarchy that occurs within the species, your (now female AND boss) clown will be more likely to accept a smaller fish as her mate. Just keep in mind that pairing clowns is not an always successful process and there's still a chance she'll accept no one, so advice to tread carefully and have a backup plan in place still holds. Any chance you have a breeder box so you can safely introduce them for a while before real exposure?
I don't have a breeder box but I can get one if it will make the process easier for them.
 

stella1979

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I have had a velvet break out a while ago but now ready to add fish. I have one clownfish that survived,she is super lonely and she needs a friend.
I've thought about another clown for her but not sure on what else I could put with her.
I've also thought about a tailspot blenny??

I know I'm limited since it's a 15 gallon but I would like to have more swimmy fish instead of just one lol
Hi again. You may notice that I've merged a new thread you created with this one here. This was done because stocking the tank was/is the focus of both threads. Please stick to just one thread regarding the same subject matter, thanks. Perhaps you'd like to change the title of this thread to reflect the subject as being the stocking of your 15 gallon tank? If so, just let me know.
 

Jesterrace

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I have had a velvet break out a while ago but now ready to add fish. I have one clownfish that survived,she is super lonely and she needs a friend.
I've thought about another clown for her but not sure on what else I could put with her.
I've also thought about a tailspot blenny??

I know I'm limited since it's a 15 gallon but I would like to have more swimmy fish instead of just one lol
Hate to say it but the Clownfish is probably perfectly happy on it's own. The concern I have is that you have a fish that has already killed a tank mate and in a 15 gallon there is no where for another fish to hide from a proven killer. Another clown might work or just end up with another dead fish. You may need to get rid of the current clown if you want to add more fish.

Some other options for a 15 gallon:

Small Gobies
Small Blennies
Possum or Pink Streaked Wrasse
Firefish

None of the above will do well with aggression though, so your best bets are either to remove the current clown or try another clown.
 
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Sierra s.

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Hate to say it but the Clownfish is probably perfectly happy on it's own. The concern I have is that you have a fish that has already killed a tank mate and in a 15 gallon there is no where for another fish to hide from a proven killer. Another clown might work or just end up with another dead fish. You may need to get rid of the current clown if you want to add more fish.

Some other options for a 15 gallon:

Small Gobies
Small Blennies
Possum or Pink Streaked Wrasse
Firefish

None of the above will do well with aggression though, so your best bets are either to remove the current clown or try another clown.
I don't think she killed him on purpose. They were still determining dominance when the velvet outbreak came up and I think she may have stressed him out enough to where he got sick and died.
They hung around each other a lot hut she was a little pushy with him, she did good with my Hi-fin goby and orchid dottyback though(dottyback was the one who started the velvet)
 

stella1979

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Considering that there was illness in the tank at that time... well, chances are, of course, higher that a new fish will survive the pairing process, though the possibility that your female will accept no one still holds. Too bad there aren't guarantees but it's worth a try if you can put some safeguards in place.

A breeder box would allow her to become accustomed to a new fish in the tank without the danger of her killing him straight off... but there's still the chance that she will when she can. Yet, if you have the breeder box, then you have a quick and easy way to separate them/keep them both safe. This seems like the best option to me but there's another thing to consider...

What will you do with the new clown should things not go as planned? This means it would be a good idea to ask if the LFS will accept returns and if no, perhaps you can seek one out that does. Barring that, perhaps you could find a new home for one or the other via social media. In your shoes, if not terribly attached to the female (I probably would be:rolleyes, I'd want to rehome her instead of him. This is because the male will be younger and smaller. Aggression comes on with sexual maturity in most cases, so your chances of pairing clowns safely and successfully are better when they are young.
 
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Sierra s.

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I have a 15gallon with one clownfish and she is lonely and I need a HARDY friend for her. What can I put with her?
 

e_watson09

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What type of clownfish. I wouldn't add anything except MAYBE another clown depending on the type you have. You could look into inverts tho.
 

stella1979

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Think we've been here before... please only create one thread per topic, thanks. This helps to keep the forum tidy and makes less work for the team around here. (Edit: I've found the other thread and am merging the two into one.)

You may try another clown, best if it's smaller than her, and you may want to use a breeder box for the introduction and/or have another container/bucket handy for quick separation in case things don't go well.

Otherwise, yes, you will want a BRAVE and HARDY fish. Look at little meanies like small damsels, perhaps a dottyback, (either of these is a quite brave/hardy/mean little fish), or maybe a royal gramma. In my experience, the RG is not terribly aggressive or mean, but is quite brave, quick, and able to hold their own. My RG will take food that's hanging out of my clown's mouth, lol, though it should be mentioned that my clown is quite friendly. Lucky me.
 
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