Happiestcamper Getting Salty

HappiestCamper

Member
Just wanted a place to track my saltwater journey!

Starting out with a 25 gal, we put live rock in yesterday now we wait for cycling!

Ill post pictures when I get home.

If this goes well the goal is to convert our 125 to saltwater but that is $$$$$ so starting smaller for now
 

ValerieAdams

Member
Yay! I'm jealous but can't wait to follow along
 
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HappiestCamper

Member
Its already so expensive but amazing how even just the rock is pretty.
 

ValerieAdams

Member
Yes, I'm buying everything slowly because it's so expensive lol. I'm going to do a 29 and the lights and RO/DI unit are what I'm waiting to get mainly because those are the most costly up front.

Are you planning on doing fish & corals?
 
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stella1979

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Member
Welcome to the salty side!!!

I know just how you guys feel. It took me months to gather everything I needed to start my own little reef, but you know what? Patience pays in spades in this hobby. I was once Stella the slow-poke, but am now sometimes called Stella the patient and wise, lol. Seriously! You are both doing things just right by starting slow and small(ish). It gives us plenty of time for the most important aspect of all... research, research, research.

If you haven't found them already, this is a GREAT guide, followed by a GREAT playlist. Both of these resources were instrumental in my own journey.

Nart's Budget Nano Saltwater Guide For Beginners


Let me know if I can help with anything.
 
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HappiestCamper

Member
Very basic layout for now, were still deciding if this is the tank we want to try this in.

The plan is to start FOWLR and eventually pick up pieces here and there and have a full reef.

And another eventually after the tank is WELL established (another reason we are debating starting a little bigger) we really want a mandarin goby/dragonette despite the effort involved in keeping one.


Thanks for the links I'll add it to my research material lol

What I'm struggling the most with is figuring out future stocking like you can with freshwater. Compatibility is more or less easy to find but calculating bioload/how many fish can safely be contained and such.



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Culprit

Member
Stocking is something you have to gain from lots of research and talking to other reefers. It really varies as each reef is completey unique. With something like a fuge to get good nutrient export (you can DIY an easy one with an Aquaclear 70 or 110) You can stock a lot heavier then something you don't have good nutrient export on. There's lots of stocking options for this tank as it has a good footprint.
 
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HappiestCamper

Member
Culprit said:
Stocking is something you have to gain from lots of research and talking to other reefers. It really varies as each reef is completey unique. With something like a fuge to get good nutrient export (you can DIY an easy one with an Aquaclear 70 or 110) You can stock a lot heavier then something you don't have good nutrient export on. There's lots of stocking options for this tank as it has a good footprint.
Any suggestions?

So far we all we know we want everything to based around the eventual inclusion of a mandarin goby
 

xiholdtruex

Member
If you want a mandarin goby a fuge is a must and for pods. You will also be dosing pods and phyto to supplement because they will destroy a well established population in a small tank. If you are worried about a bio load a decent skimmer should help also.

I believe stocking is personal to people. Bio load as long as you don't add more than one fish every month you should be good as long as it can live in the tank with the inhabitants and is the right size for the tank.

I personally love fire fish, clown fish, mandarin goby, chromis.
 

Wraithen

Member
Wow. You certainly jumped way faster than me lol. I remember us starting out here at about the same time and I'm only on a huge fw tank!
 
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HappiestCamper

Member
Wraithen said:
Wow. You certainly jumped way faster than me lol. I remember us starting out here at about the same time and I'm only on a huge fw tank!
Back in 2016? Lol my boyfriend is what we call a pusher aaaaand impulsive aaaaaand he seems to have an affinity for expensive hobbies

If it was just me we would wait another 1.5 years till I'm finally out of college and have extra $$$$

xiholdtruex said:
If you want a mandarin goby a fuge is a must and for pods. You will also be dosing pods and phyto to supplement because they will destroy a well established population in a small tank. If you are worried about a bio load a decent skimmer should help also.

I believe stocking is personal to people. Bio load as long as you don't add more than one fish every month you should be good as long as it can live in the tank with the inhabitants and is the right size for the tank.

I personally love fire fish, clown fish, mandarin goby, chromis.
That's partially why we're considering starting even a little bigger but we shall see.

We're also finding people are having luck with fuzzy dwarf lion fish in reef tanks which is also tempting. (Whenever we go bigger)

Some of the designer clowns are super cute and I like that they are often captive bred.

My personal faves are blenny/goby types

My boyfriend really loved the chocolate chip starfish but again not reef compatible
 

Wraithen

Member
HappiestCamper said:
Back in 2016? Lol my boyfriend is what we call a pusher aaaaand impulsive aaaaaand he seems to have an affinity for expensive hobbies

If it was just me we would wait another 1.5 years till I'm finally out of college and have extra $$$$
Yep. I bought a 10 gallon for my daughter and realized I was in way over my head so I joined here since all the google searches wound up here anyway.

I'm the pushy one lol. That's how my 180 ended up in my front room a month before I left the country for a while
 
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HappiestCamper

Member
In theory...if we wanted to just set up the 125, it is my understanding that we could slowly acquire enough rock vs. Buying 125 lbs up front.

True or false?
 
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stella1979

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Member
First of all, the pound per gallon rule in saltwater is an imperfect one. It doesn't take into account the density of the rock. For example, let's consider two rock types. FijI dry rock, which is what I have, is rather dense and heavy. It's certainly porous enough for a reef tank, but the porosity of PukanI dry rock makes it much, much lighter. So, 20 pounds of PukanI might fill a box, and 20 pounds of FijI might only half fill the same size box.

The rock in a salty tank is your biofilter, and also what makes the fish comfortable. I would say no to starting very light on rock. Since beneficial bacteria colonize the rocks, you will need enough of it for a large enough BB colony to support your stock. So, I wouldn't start very light on rock, but if you had at least half and stocked slowly, you shouldn't have to worry about the cycle Beyond that, most salty fish are quite territorial, and it's the rock work that establishes that territory. Also, it's where all your biodiversity lives... all the pods and such that makes for an established mature tank. Lastly, there's a concern about adding new rock to an existing tank. You'd do best to cure any rocks before they go in the tank, and who wants to be curing rocks all the time. If you start with all the rock, you can do an in-tank cure on the rocks, cycle them at the same time, and do it all before turning on the lights to limit algae growth. Algae loves growing on a fresh new rock.

Here's the thing though... rock can be cheap. Just thought I should point out that you don't need live rock. Most choose to start with a little live and a bunch of dry. For instance, if we wanted 20 lbs. of rock, we might get 3 lbs. live, and 17 lbs. dry. This saves a lot of pennies, and that small amount of live rock will seed the dry rock, making the cycle and the biodiversity all happen/come quicker. However, again, you don't need live rock... at all. I started my tank with dry rock only, and not a single chunk of live rock ever entered it, though that original dry rock is certainly live now. I did a fishless cycle that took 30 days, and it did take a little longer for pods and coralline algae to show up. I was okay with that because the best thing about dry rock is that it's guaranteed to be best free. Hmmm, I actually just was commenting on a new thread about live rock that came with aiptasia, (nasty little pest anemones), and possibly a murderous crab.

It's entirely up to you, of course, but you can pick up nice dry rock for under $3 per pound. BRS Reef Saver is excellent to rock scape with.
 
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HappiestCamper

Member
stella1979 said:
First of all, the pound per gallon rule in saltwater is an imperfect one. It doesn't take into account the density of the rock. For example, let's consider two rock types. FijI dry rock, which is what I have, is rather dense and heavy. It's certainly porous enough for a reef tank, but the porosity of PukanI dry rock makes it much, much lighter. So, 20 pounds of PukanI might fill a box, and 20 pounds of FijI might only half fill the same size box.

The rock in a salty tank is your biofilter, and also what makes the fish comfortable. I would say no to starting very light on rock. Since beneficial bacteria colonize the rocks, you will need enough of it for a large enough BB colony to support your stock. So, I wouldn't start very light on rock, but if you had at least half and stocked slowly, you shouldn't have to worry about the cycle Beyond that, most salty fish are quite territorial, and it's the rock work that establishes that territory. Also, it's where all your biodiversity lives... all the pods and such that makes for an established mature tank. Lastly, there's a concern about adding new rock to an existing tank. You'd do best to cure any rocks before they go in the tank, and who wants to be curing rocks all the time. If you start with all the rock, you can do an in-tank cure on the rocks, cycle them at the same time, and do it all before turning on the lights to limit algae growth. Algae loves growing on a fresh new rock.

Here's the thing though... rock can be cheap. Just thought I should point out that you don't need live rock. Most choose to start with a little live and a bunch of dry. For instance, if we wanted 20 lbs. of rock, we might get 3 lbs. live, and 17 lbs. dry. This saves a lot of pennies, and that small amount of live rock will seed the dry rock, making the cycle and the biodiversity all happen/come quicker. However, again, you don't need live rock... at all. I started my tank with dry rock only, and not a single chunk of live rock ever entered it, though that original dry rock is certainly live now. I did a fishless cycle that took 30 days, and it did take a little longer for pods and coralline algae to show up. I was okay with that because the best thing about dry rock is that it's guaranteed to be best free. Hmmm, I actually just was commenting on a new thread about live rock that came with aiptasia, (nasty little pest anemones), and possibly a murderous crab.

It's entirely up to you, of course, but you can pick up nice dry rock for under $3 per pound. BRS Reef Saver is excellent to rock scape with.
Should have known the rule was too simple $3/lb is much better but still $2-300.

Thank you for all the tips to research!!

We're leaning toward waiting till we build our house and doing a sweet salt water custom build and using the 25 to help us learn and grow through our beginning phase so we can have and easier time when real $$$ is on the line.


Yikes! Should we be lights off right now?
 

xiholdtruex

Member
I started with dry rock and purchased 12lbs and ended up having to take some out because it over crowded the tank and my tank has been fine without it.it. also have to take into account water displacement which would also drop the amount of rock. I would day day pukanI is problably the most porus and is advantagious for bb.

I personally has no issue with my light cycle during cycling.

Also with live sand which I used caribsea fijI I had nutrients leeching into my water collumn and random nitrate spikes for the first two months.
 
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stella1979

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Member
I left the light off for the full 30 days of cycling/curing of our FijI rock in the tank. Zero algae growth during that time, not even diatoms, which was surprising since the tank gets filtered sunlight since it's in the living room. One the lights went on, fish and a small CUC were added, the diatoms did come. It wasn't terrible though, so we didn't mind looking at them between weekly water changes. Also, knock on wood, I'd say we had very, very minimal algae ever since... that is, until recently when we upped the stock with a couple new fish and a shrimp, AND started feeding heavier. It is only now, after that and a year and a half in, that the tank is growing more gha than I'd like. Prior to the new fish and with careful feeding during that time, we had almost zero algae growth for more than a year. (Seriously, I had a few dots of bubble algae that came with a frag, and very, very little of anything else.) I do think that limiting growth from the get-go has something to do with that. GHA loves a cycling tank and fresh rock. I will always cycle and cure rocks with lights off. Just my opinion.
 
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HappiestCamper

Member
Thanks for the input guys! Unless a wild deal appears we're sticking with the 25 for now for sure.

We have mostly live rock, the one purple piece isn't. And just BDBS.
Reading this makes me glad we didn't do live sand.
 

Culprit

Member
HappiestCamper said:
Thanks for the input guys! Unless a wild deal appears we're sticking with the 25 for now for sure.

We have mostly live rock, the one purple piece isn't. And just BDBS.
Reading this makes me glad we didn't do live sand.
I've always kept lights on during cycle. And my live sand didn't ever leak nutrients. When I first put live sand in I stir it up really really well and keep stirring it over the course of a few days, replacing the floss often. Eventually, I can completely stir my sand and its cloudfree completely.

Imo running a fuge as soon as the cycle happened is what kept me free of algae. It just outcompetes it. Once corals go in, of course, I back off the light so there's nutrients but I ran it almost 24/7 when I frist started the tank.
 
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HappiestCamper

Member
Starting to notice random life on the rocks, how is an empty tank still this fun to look at ?
 

Culprit

Member
HappiestCamper said:
Starting to notice random life on the rocks, how is an empty tank still this fun to look at ?
Haha watching biodiversity develop is SUPER cool. It's great your seeing life already!
 
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HappiestCamper

Member
New babies ♡♡

Also added a HOB fuge aaaaand a tigger pod colony

So current stock:
2 clowns


And

1 zoa
3 mushrooms?
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stella1979

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Those clowns are BEAUTIFUL!!! Do you know the designer name of the orange one? It's almost naked! Looks like they're in a QT, which is excellent! Would you mind sharing the qt's size with me, as well as how you're filtering a bare tank? I had the toughest time cycling my own 5 gallon qt when I started it bare and with an AC20 with a sponge and all the Matrix that would fit in that little filter. It absolutely would not cycle like that, though I tried for months. It would never process nitrites. I prefer a bare qt and Matrix so there is less worry of meds being absorbed, however, the only thing that got that tank to cycle was to pack that filter to the brI'm with Marine Pure and adding a thin layer of sand. So, what's your trick?

I'm assuming the question mark next to "3 mushrooms" means that you're hoping for more specifics. I think the first 2 are ricordias, though it's tough to say which kind. Possibly Florida or Yuma. The last pic looks like a disco, or more accurately, a Discosoma.
 

Culprit

Member
Gorgeous clowns!! Looks like you have an almost naked clownfish (the all orange), and a snowflake mabye? Are they getting QTed or going straight into DT?

Zoas look like Radioactive dragon eyes but can't 100% tell until they're all the way open. Shrooms look great too! 2 Ricordeas I think and then a watermelon discosoma mabye. Either way, super sweet haul!
 
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HappiestCamper

Member
Confession time :/

We weren't as prepared as we thought to QT. Last night after acclimating in the QT we had to put them in the DT. (We forgot a heater *facepalm*)

Any further inhabitants will be properly qt'd moving forward, in the meantime we have to deal with any problems we have potentially introduced into the DT because we can't turn back now.

Luckily we don't have any inverts yet and only the three corals.

As for the clowns (I just love them ) they were sold as:
-"amphiprion ocellaris picasso helmet" (the white one)
AND
-"clownfish naked with spots" the orange one

And of course since we had to put them in the DT the white one has to have stringy white poo... advice? >

The corals were buy 2 get one free in the bargain bin they seem to be settling in.




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Culprit

Member
HappiestCamper said:
Confession time :/

We weren't as prepared as we thought to QT. Last night after acclimating in the QT we had to put them in the DT. (We forgot a heater *facepalm*)

Any further inhabitants will be properly qt'd moving forward, in the meantime we have to deal with any problems we have potentially introduced into the DT because we can't turn back now.

Luckily we don't have any inverts yet and only the three corals.

As for the clowns (I just love them ) they were sold as:
-"amphiprion ocellaris picasso helmet" (the white one)
AND
-"clownfish naked with spots" the orange one

And of course since we had to put them in the DT the white one has to have stringy white poo... advice?

The corals were buy 2 get one free in the bargain bin they seem to be settling in.




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The clowns have some kind of internal parasite. I would get metroanzidole (seachem metro works well) seachem focus, and then if you don't have it some kind of pellet food (NLS Thera is great). Some garlic guard is good to get too and will make them more likely to eat it. Basically the metro is a antI parasitic ect but won't bind to the food (needs to be eaten). The focus will bind the metro to the food, so it stays on. The garlic guard will make it far more palatable to the fish. However, I've used just plain garlic juice before and it worked great.

Did you see any signs of disease in the tank they were in? Heavy breathing, dying fish, spots, etc? Are they showing any signs of stress or whatever, e.g. heavy breathing, scratching, weird swimming?

Corals look happy! Definitely a nice colony of radioactive dragon eye zoas (first pic), a watermelon discosoma mushroom (second pic), and a hairy mushroom I think.
 
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HappiestCamper

Member
Culprit said:
The clowns have some kind of internal parasite. I would get metroanzidole (seachem metro works well) seachem focus, and then if you don't have it some kind of pellet food (NLS Thera is great). Some garlic guard is good to get too and will make them more likely to eat it. Basically the metro is a antI parasitic ect but won't bind to the food (needs to be eaten). The focus will bind the metro to the food, so it stays on. The garlic guard will make it far more palatable to the fish. However, I've used just plain garlic juice before and it worked great.

Did you see any signs of disease in the tank they were in? Heavy breathing, dying fish, spots, etc? Are they showing any signs of stress or whatever, e.g. heavy breathing, scratching, weird swimming?

Corals look happy! Definitely a nice colony of radioactive dragon eye zoas (first pic), a watermelon discosoma mushroom (second pic), and a hairy mushroom I think.
They were in separate shipments, orange had been there for three weeks and everyone in his tank was pretty active and most had paired off.

White was part of tuesdays shipment and everyone in that tank seemed fine too there was just a lot more of them.

Right now theyre both hanging out swimming next to eachother but before feeding they were on opposite sides of the tank. To be fair I also don't really know *normal* behavior for these guys.

So saltwater fish are treated similar to fresh water? Let me check the medicine cabinet! I know we have garlic guard and focus just don't remember which meds.
 

Culprit

Member
HappiestCamper said:
They were in separate shipments, orange had been there for three weeks and everyone in his tank was pretty active and most had paired off.

White was part of tuesdays shipment and everyone in that tank seemed fine too there was just a lot more of them.

Right now theyre both hanging out swimming next to eachother but before feeding they were on opposite sides of the tank. To be fair I also don't really know *normal* behavior for these guys.

So saltwater fish are treated similar to fresh water? Let me check the medicine cabinet! I know we have garlic guard and focus just don't remember which meds.
Hopefully they pair up soon! Are they both pretty small? If/when they pair up they'll swim around each other, or be near each other. Howeve,r my previous clown pair was "paired" but never swam near each other. Also, one will become smaller and one will get bigger.

Kinda. Saltwater disease is a way bigger deal then freshwater. It will kill, quickly, and there's lots more types and its lots more common. But yes, some of the diseases and treatments are roughly the same. Metro is a great med to have on hand, you can use it for antibacterial, you can use it with a lot of meds, antI parasitc, and it treats brook and uronomea.
 
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HappiestCamper

Member
Culprit said:
Hopefully they pair up soon! Are they both pretty small? If/when they pair up they'll swim around each other, or be near each other. Howeve,r my previous clown pair was "paired" but never swam near each other. Also, one will become smaller and one will get bigger.

Kinda. Saltwater disease is a way bigger deal then freshwater. It will kill, quickly, and there's lots more types and its lots more common. But yes, some of the diseases and treatments are roughly the same. Metro is a great med to have on hand, you can use it for antibacterial, you can use it with a lot of meds, antI parasitc, and it treats brook and uronomea.
If you had to guess at its survival chance what would you guess? We're still within the return window and I'm in love but its also a lot of money....
 

Culprit

Member
For the parasites they can live their life with them so they're not a big deal. You definitely want them out though, and the metro/focus/food treatment is extremely easy on the fish, and will clean them out quickly. If they have no other diseases I'd peg it at 100%
 
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HappiestCamper

Member
Culprit said:
For the parasites they can live their life with them so they're not a big deal. You definitely want them out though, and the metro/focus/food treatment is extremely easy on the fish, and will clean them out quickly. If they have no other diseases I'd peg it at 100%
Awesome thank you for the advice! If this little helmet will eat the meds we will keep and treat. Fingers crossed!!! Meds soaking currently!

HappiestCamper said:
Awesome thank you for the advice! If this little helmet will eat the meds we will keep and treat. Fingers crossed!!! Meds soaking currently!
Update he didnt eat any..... orange did though :/ ill try again later tonight... any tips? I tried both in main tank and in breeder box...
 

Culprit

Member
He may not be hungry from the parasite. Did you use some kind of garlic? I believe you can also use frozen food with metro but its a bit harder to get to attach, stella1979 has done it before I know and she'll know what to do. I'd try again later, and if not then keep trying over the next few days as he might still be stressed out from getting put in and not be hungry.
 
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HappiestCamper

Member
Culprit said:
He may not be hungry from the parasite. Did you use some kind of garlic? I believe you can also use frozen food with metro but its a bit harder to get to attach, stella1979 has done it before I know and she'll know what to do. I'd try again later, and if not then keep trying over the next few days as he might still be stressed out from getting put in and not be hungry.
Well they extended the return policy for us so we're going to try our best.

When treating freshwater we had the easiest time with frozen food since the pellets dissolved (like they did today) so I'm going to pick up a small frozen food on my way home to try.

Another store said something about baking the food to reharden or something? Idk

Also does anyone know anything about prazipro?
 
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stella1979

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HI Hmm, I can't say I have a ton of experience with disease, but I did successfully treat internal parasites using medicated frozen foods. Here's how that went...

Pellets are better at absorbing meds, but I didn't know if my fish, a clown, and a watchman goby, would eat pellets. So, I tested that out with unmedicated pellets, which the clown ate greedily, and the goby didn't touch. That answered that, so I followed directions for medicating frozen food. They were to mix 1 Tablespoon of thawed food with 1 scoop Metroplex, 1 scoop Focus, and some garlic for flavor. I covered the little bowl and stored it in the fridge for 30-45 minutes before transferring to a zip-top bag, pressing flat, and refreezing. Flattening in a bag allows us to break off only what we need for a single treatment.

I'm of the mind, that like with humans, medications work best when a consistent level is maintained within the fish. So, I set an alarm and was sure to feed the medicated food twice a day, 12 hours apart. It was tough to watch the fish often enough, and I didn't see much for 5 days... no normal waste, but no stringy stuff either. On day 6, I despaired that I saw white stringy waste from the clown, but the recommended treatment period is 10-21 days, so I just continued. On day 8, I saw normal waste! Yay!! Saw that again on day 9 and 10, so I stopped treatment after day 10 and continued to monitor the fish in qt as closely as I could for another 9 days while I put them through a PrazI treatment. Then, they went in the reef tank, and they've been happy and healthy ever since.

PraziPro is a de-wormer. It works for common flukes and the like. It's also very gentle, and I use it on every fish I bring home. I learned how effective and gentle this was when I had my first fish (Scorch the firefish) and just a few corals in the reef tank... before I had a qt. Scorch had been with us for about 4 weeks when he suddenly started flashing and shaking his head a lot. We could see some little worm-like thing moving around in his head! Probably flukes that entered through his gills at some point, and grew to eventually bother him. I was, of course, reluctant to dose the reef tank, but had no other choice. As soon as PrazI hit the water, the flukes erupted out of Scorch's head. It was wild as heck, but he seemed to immediately feel better and has been free of flukes since. That was about a year and a half ago, and yep, I've used PrazI several times since on new fish. This is the one med that I will dose without any symptoms.
 
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HappiestCamper

Member
stella1979 said:
HI Hmm, I can't say I have a ton of experience with disease, but I did successfully treat internal parasites using medicated frozen foods. Here's how that went...

Pellets are better at absorbing meds, but I didn't know if my fish, a clown, and a watchman goby, would eat pellets. So, I tested that out with unmedicated pellets, which the clown ate greedily, and the goby didn't touch. That answered that, so I followed directions for medicating frozen food. They were to mix 1 Tablespoon of thawed food with 1 scoop Metroplex, 1 scoop Focus, and some garlic for flavor. I covered the little bowl and stored it in the fridge for 30-45 minutes before transferring to a zip-top bag, pressing flat, and refreezing. Flattening in a bag allows us to break off only what we need for a single treatment.

I'm of the mind, that like with humans, medications work best when a consistent level is maintained within the fish. So, I set an alarm and was sure to feed the medicated food twice a day, 12 hours apart. It was tough to watch the fish often enough, and I didn't see much for 5 days... no normal waste, but no stringy stuff either. On day 6, I despaired that I saw white stringy waste from the clown, but the recommended treatment period is 10-21 days, so I just continued. On day 8, I saw normal waste! Yay!! Saw that again on day 9 and 10, so I stopped treatment after day 10 and continued to monitor the fish in qt as closely as I could for another 9 days while I put them through a PrazI treatment. Then, they went in the reef tank, and they've been happy and healthy ever since.

PraziPro is a de-wormer. It works for common flukes and the like. It's also very gentle, and I use it on every fish I bring home. I learned how effective and gentle this was when I had my first fish (Scorch the firefish) and just a few corals in the reef tank... before I had a qt. Scorch had been with us for about 4 weeks when he suddenly started flashing and shaking his head a lot. We could see some little worm-like thing moving around in his head! Probably flukes that entered through his gills at some point, and grew to eventually bother him. I was, of course, reluctant to dose the reef tank, but had no other choice. As soon as PrazI hit the water, the flukes erupted out of Scorch's head. It was wild as heck, but he seemed to immediately feel better and has been free of flukes since. That was about a year and a half ago, and yep, I've used PrazI several times since on new fish. This is the one med that I will dose without any symptoms.
Wow thank you so much! I'll update during my experience. Just to clarify you treated metro days 1-10 and prazI for days 11-21?

Can I ask what your qt routine looks like so I can do better moving forward? With freshwater I don't preventively medicate, sounds like maybe I should with salt?
 
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stella1979

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Member
No probs. Yes, I treated with Metro for days 1-10 but skipped a few before Prazi. The idea was to get them comfy and fat with un-medicated food first, then probably did PrazI for 14-22.

Ermm, here's the thing about meds... we should ALWAYS follow manufacturer's directions because they are the ones that have tested their product for safety and effectiveness. However, a member knowledgeable in meds, that I highly trust, but is no longer around, once told me that PrazI loses effectiveness rather fast, and is doing nothing for the fish after day 4. So, contrary to directions, I dose Prazi, (let's just call it day 1), then on the morning of day 5 I do a 50% water change and do a second dose of Prazi. On the morning of day 9, I do another 50% wc and put carbon in the filter. From there, the fish are watched for any other signs of disease. And this is usually how I start qt, but not on the day I bring them home. Instead, I let them get comfy and dose PrazI 4-5 days after bringing a fish home.

With my clown and goby, I saw white stringy poo before I began the PrazI treatment, so completed the Metro treatment first. After 10 days of Metro, a 3 or 4 day break with lots of food, then my standard PrazI treatment, the fish were closely observed for another week, then finally granted entry to the reef tank. Yes, I make fish run the gauntlet before they are granted entry, and that's kind of sad. I've had my share of losses though, and am firm in my belief that illness in the reef tank may be much sadder. I've picked what I believe to be the lesser of two evils.

Just to be clear, my standard QT protocol is to watch the fish for less than a week, and if they show zero symptoms of illness, I hit them with PrazI anyway, which is a 9-day treatment. Then they are watched again and will be treated for anything that pops up. If symptoms appear before Prazi, I will treat the obvious problem first. My war chest contains Prazi, Metro, Focus, Rid Ich+ (containing malachite green & formalin), Copper, and a copper test kit.
 
  • Moderator

stella1979

Moderator
Member
No probs. Yes, I treated with Metro for days 1-10 but skipped a few before Prazi. The idea was to get them comfy and fat with un-medicated food first, then probably did PrazI for 14-22.

Ermm, here's the thing about meds... we should ALWAYS follow manufacturer's directions because they are the ones that have tested their product for safety and effectiveness. However, a member knowledgeable in meds, that I highly trust, but is no longer around, once told me that PrazI loses effectiveness rather fast, and is doing nothing for the fish after day 4. So, contrary to directions, I dose Prazi, (let's just call it day 1), then on the morning of day 5 I do a 50% water change and do a second dose of Prazi. On the morning of day 9, I do another 50% wc and put carbon in the filter. From there, the fish are watched for any other signs of disease. And this is usually how I start qt, but not on the day I bring them home. Instead, I let them get comfy and dose PrazI 4-5 days after bringing a fish home.

With my clown and goby, I saw white stringy poo before I began the PrazI treatment, so completed the Metro treatment first. After 10 days of Metro, a 3 or 4 day break with lots of food, then my standard PrazI treatment, the fish were closely observed for another week, then finally granted entry to the reef tank. Yes, I make fish run the gauntlet before they are granted entry, and that's kind of sad. I've had my share of losses though, and am firm in my belief that illness in the reef tank may be much sadder. I've picked what I believe to be the lesser of two evils.

Just to be clear, my standard QT protocol is to watch the fish for less than a week, and if they show zero symptoms of illness, I hit them with PrazI anyway, which is a 9-day treatment. Then they are watched again and will be treated for anything that pops up. If symptoms appear before Prazi, I will treat the obvious problem first. My war chest contains Prazi, Metro, Focus, Rid Ich+ (containing malachite green & formalin), Copper, and a copper test kit.
 
  • Thread Starter

HappiestCamper

Member
Feeling disheartened

White still won't eat. I tried this time with frozen mysis as advised above. He seems excited that food is added, goes up like he's gonna eat but doesn't open his mouth.

I even tried with the filter off as to not add flow.

Orange ate plenty.

Any ideas?

Still not eating this morning either... I think we're going to have to exchange white.

These guys never really went through a fighting stage so more I'm nervous about orange being introduced to someone new now that he has the upper hand.

We took white back I liked their corals and employees but their manager lost our business.
 
  • Thread Starter

HappiestCamper

Member
Corals are settling in orange is still doing good too ♡
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Culprit

Member
Sorry to hear the bad news .

It's great the corals are looking good though!
 
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