Half Year Update. Pretty Bad Algae Problem

  • Thread starter

Avectasi

Valued Member
Messages
68
Reaction score
10
Points
43
Experience
1 year
So within the months I’ve had my 29 gallon tank with 1 betta 5 neon tetras and 6 black tetras doing well. One of my neons died awhile ago due to being stuck in the sponge filter. But what the problem is the algae I have spreads very quickly which I’m not sure if it harms the fish but they seem fine but as the looks for the tank doesn’t seem pretty. The glass gets covered easily. Not sure if magnetic sponges help but sometimes they scrape it off but the sponge leaves a pretty bad poop smell

I recently gave it a weekly water change. I change around 4-5 gallos of 29 gallons in the tank weekly. Though every time if I try to clean or add water all the algae starts flying everywhere making it look very bad meanwhile the tetras are trying to eat it lol.

is there a way that will stop the growing? Here’s are some pictures I took on how it looks. It grows on my rocks giving out air bubbles inside. But you can tell its a pretty bad algae in the tank.
 

Attachments

OhDaniGirl

Valued Member
Messages
87
Reaction score
72
Points
63
Experience
Just started
Have you tried cutting back on your lighting? Or splitting it up? I have my tank lights on for 4 hours in the morning and 4 in the evening, and it helps keep the algae down.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter

Avectasi

Valued Member
Messages
68
Reaction score
10
Points
43
Experience
1 year
OhDaniGirl said:
Have you tried cutting back on your lighting? Or splitting it up? I have my tank lights on for 4 hours in the morning and 4 in the evening, and it helps keep the algae down.
Hmm I haven’t tried that Ive used from the kit that was in. I have a timer though it goes off at 9am-7pm and what I can tell it’s pretty bright
 

Fahn

Fishlore VIP
Messages
6,511
Reaction score
3,691
Points
458
First of all I would be changing 15 gallons of water weekly as you are currently changing out only about 15% when you should be doing 50%.

10 hours of light is excessive, cut it back to 6.

Manually remove as much algae as you can.

Feed your fish once a day every other day. This will cut back on waste.

Do you have live plants? Are you dosing any fertilizers?
 

OhDaniGirl

Valued Member
Messages
87
Reaction score
72
Points
63
Experience
Just started
I would start with cutting back on the hours of lighting, and see if that helps.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter

Avectasi

Valued Member
Messages
68
Reaction score
10
Points
43
Experience
1 year

Fahn

Fishlore VIP
Messages
6,511
Reaction score
3,691
Points
458
Avectasi said:
Should I do it now or wait until it’s settled since I recently changed it?
You can wait for it to settle.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter

Avectasi

Valued Member
Messages
68
Reaction score
10
Points
43
Experience
1 year
Fahn said:
First of all I would be changing 15 gallons of water weekly as you are currently changing out only about 15% when you should be doing 50%.

10 hours of light is excessive, cut it back to 6.

Manually remove as much algae as you can.

Feed your fish once a day every other day. This will cut back on waste.

Do you have live plants? Are you dosing any fertilizers?
I’ll try to cut it back more thanks!

Should I get a sponge scraper at the local pet store to manually remove algae?

Ill try cutting it possible. I mostly feed them 1 feeding per day as flakes and pellets

I do have live plants but it’s been covered with algae which killed them so as now there’s not a lot as before. I don’t use fertilizer though I should’ve but I’ve used the liquid for plants I forgot what’s it called

Though as my bucket which only gets 5 gallons each time is a hassle which is probably too much for me. (Should’ve known before fish-keeping) I have the python water changer but the problem is that none of the sinks connect to it neither the adapters which is more of a problem...
 

Fahn

Fishlore VIP
Messages
6,511
Reaction score
3,691
Points
458
The best tools to have in your arsenal for cleaning glass are a razor blade and Mr. Clean Magic erasers (I buy the generic Walmart brand). Combined there is nothing they can't scrub or scrape off.

Your algae was probably caused by a combination the following:
1) excessive amounts of light
2) not a high enough plantload to utilize that much light
3) plants were not getting fertilizers, so were easily outcompeted by algae
4) small, insufficient water changes allowed organics and nitrates to accumulate, fueling algae growth

How you can fix it:
1) manually remove as much algae as possible, siphon loose algae out with a hose
2) cut back on the feedings to every other day
3) reduce your lighting to 6 hours
4) do larger water changes of 50% weekly
5) also, while the algae is bad, do frequent small water changes of 5 gallons or less daily if you want
6) add fast growing stem plants*, and provide them with nutrients with fertilizers; NilocG Thrive is one of the best liquid fertilizers you can get
7) floating plants such as Salvinia or Amazon frogbit will filter your water and shade the plants underneath from excess light

*Ludwigia repens, Rotala indica, Hygrophila corymbosa, Bacopa caroliniana, Hydrocotyle tripartita, to name a few

Avectasi said:
Though as my bucket which only gets 5 gallons each time is a hassle which is probably too much for me. (Should’ve known before fish-keeping) I have the python water changer but the problem is that none of the sinks connect to it neither the adapters which is more of a problem...
Bruh

Try changing out a minimum of 25% on a 75 gallon saltwater, 50 gallon saltwater, 15 gallon saltwater, 2x 55 gallon freshwater, a 30 gallon freshwater, and a 5 gallon freshwater tank with just 2x 5 gallon buckets and a hose every weekend. And the distance between the water reservoir and the tanks was a good 70 feet.

Point is that if you want to keep your tanks clean and healthy, you have to be willing to put in the work.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter

Avectasi

Valued Member
Messages
68
Reaction score
10
Points
43
Experience
1 year
Fahn said:
The best tools to have in your arsenal for cleaning glass are a razor blade and Mr. Clean Magic erasers (I buy the generic Walmart brand). Combined there is nothing they can't scrub or scrape off.

Your algae was probably caused by a combination the following:
1) excessive amounts of light
2) not a high enough plantload to utilize that much light
3) plants were not getting fertilizers, so were easily outcompeted by algae
4) small, insufficient water changes allowed organics and nitrates to accumulate, fueling algae growth

How you can fix it:
1) manually remove as much algae as possible, siphon loose algae out with a hose
2) cut back on the feedings to every other day
3) reduce your lighting to 6 hours
4) do larger water changes of 50% weekly
5) also, while the algae is bad, do frequent small water changes of 5 gallons or less daily if you want
6) add fast growing stem plants*, and provide them with nutrients with fertilizers; NilocG Thrive is one of the best liquid fertilizers you can get
7) floating plants such as Salvinia or Amazon frogbit will filter your water and shade the plants underneath from excess light

*Ludwigia repens, Rotala indica, Hygrophila corymbosa, Bacopa caroliniana, Hydrocotyle tripartita, to name a few



Bruh

Try changing out a minimum of 25% on a 75 gallon saltwater, 50 gallon saltwater, 15 gallon saltwater, 2x 55 gallon freshwater, a 30 gallon freshwater, and a 5 gallon freshwater tank with just 2x 5 gallon buckets and a hose every weekend. And the distance between the water reservoir and the tanks was a good 70 feet.

Point is that if you want to keep your tanks clean and healthy, you have to be willing to put in the work.
Darn pretty much a body builder lol. I’ll try doing most of it in this upcoming week. Thank you!
 

Dennis57

Well Known Member
Messages
504
Reaction score
369
Points
83
Experience
More than 10 years
Increase your water change to like 50% a week, feed your fish every other day only enough that they will eat within 2-3 minutes.
If you don't have live plants, keep lights on like 5-6 hours a day.
Buy either a Siamese algae eater and or some Nerite Snails.
 

TucanSam

Valued Member
Messages
202
Reaction score
101
Points
73
Experience
1 year
Do you have a hose hookup outside? Pythons will easily attach to that.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter

Avectasi

Valued Member
Messages
68
Reaction score
10
Points
43
Experience
1 year
TucanSam said:
Do you have a hose hookup outside? Pythons will easily attach to that.
I do have a hose but I’m not sure if it’s too cold for the fish since I keep it in the 77s haven’t tried the temperature for it
 

Gavius

New Member
Messages
33
Reaction score
16
Points
18
I had pretty bad green hair algae problem like you but Seachem excel cleared them all in about 2 weeks. I skipped the loading dose but doubled the recommended daily dosage. It didnt seem to affect my cherry shrimps and fishes at all.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter

Avectasi

Valued Member
Messages
68
Reaction score
10
Points
43
Experience
1 year
So an update for you guys,

Im currently doing a large water change probably around 10 gals or more and trying my best to scrub all of the algae off the decor and plants.

The rocks are the most difficult since both are covered with but one is just stuck with algae so I’m not sure how should I take it out. After all the hard scrubbing with the Mr Clean eraser it sure turned very dark green. I try to vacuum most of the algae out but there is A TON of small algae floating around the vacuum does little job for sucking it up. Not sure how should I take out the rest of the floating algae so tips are welcome!

By vacuum I meant siphon...
 

kallililly1973

Fishlore VIP
Messages
7,711
Reaction score
6,083
Points
573
Experience
3 years
Everyone set you on the right track. You can take some polyfill and use an elastic and attach it to your intake then before you remove it put a net under it so it grabs a large amount of it. Keep up with 50% WC's and testing your parameters and manual removal of any excessive algae you see and you will be good to go.
 

Fahn

Fishlore VIP
Messages
6,511
Reaction score
3,691
Points
458
If the algae on the rocks is stubborn, take a steel wire brush and give them a good scrub.
 

Oarngesi

Valued Member
Messages
182
Reaction score
41
Points
63
Experience
Just started
Green nerite snails will take care of the algae throw about 15 in and you’ll be golden
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter

Avectasi

Valued Member
Messages
68
Reaction score
10
Points
43
Experience
1 year
Oarngesi said:
Green nerite snails will take care of the algae throw about 15 in and you’ll be golden
15 looks intimidating. Don’t snails produce a lot of waste?

Also this how it looks now. Much visible but yet a lot of floating specks of algae. I’ll try to get another test kit I’ve lost my paper plus one of the glass tubes broke.. Right now I don’t have enough to get the stuff I need maybe in the upcoming week
 

Attachments

Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom