Guppy turning black? Is something wrong?

Silverleaf209
  • #1
So I have had the guppies for about 1 and a half months, they are all fine except for this one guppy Ironically it was the half black guppy and his fins and face are now turning black all of the other guppies are fine and no other fish seem affected and the guppy still seems active and healthy and is eating properly, I do water changes every week of about 25%. Thanks for reading this!:)
 

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HupGupp
  • #2
Is he just colouring up as he matures? If he's healthy, he's probably fine.
 

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emeraldking
  • #3
I do think that you're dealing with what HUpGupp has mentioned.
 
Silverleaf209
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
Is he just colouring up as he matures? If he's healthy, he's probably fine.
I do think that you're dealing with what HUpGupp has mentioned.
Okay, thank you!
 
BPSabelhaus
  • #5
Agreed about him just “earning his stripes” so to speak. Got a pic?

Watching them color up, especially late bloomers, is always fun. My boy Oliver took almost a year to achieve his full and final look. When I brought him indoors from an outdoor greenwater pond he was a beautiful grey/olive drab half and half (hence Oliver)

Now he’s half black with a glorious double sword / spade tail with a purple / blue iridescence (he’s an Endler) I miss his drab coloration a bit. I keep mine in high brackish and he looked like a perfect little marine fish scooting among the algaes. Oh well, give it a year or so lol
 
HELPGUPPY
  • #6
So I have had the guppies for about 1 and a half months, they are all fine except for this one guppy Ironically it was the half black guppy and his fins and face are now turning black all of the other guppies are fine and no other fish seem affected and the guppy still seems active and healthy and is eating properly, I do water changes every week of about 25%. Thanks for reading this!:)
This happen to me before, my guppy started to turn green as it got older, I love to Hear if this guppy gets any more colors
 

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emeraldking
  • #7
Also when we speak about full grown guppies, there still can be underlaying colors present. Such underneath colors can be shown when the light hits the body or when aging. The density of the chromatophores can change when aging. When the density gets less, the underlaying color can show up more. And this underlaying color in combination with the older second color, can make a different shine on the body. But this all has got to do with the dominant and recessive colors that they carry.
Dominant traits (like e.g., colors) can als be divided into dominant, double dominant and triple dominant. The same goes for recessive traits. Also the grade of the dominant and recessive trait, will decide wether a trait will be visible or not.
A fish has three layers of skin. Most (so, not all) recessive colors are in the second layer of skin. Depending on the density of the blue colors cells (guanine), the colors in the second layer "can" be shown as well or not. In case they can be shown, it will make a different color or shine in the appearance. Like blue (as being in the top layer with a lesser density and yellow in the second layer, makes a green appearance. Like Japan blue guppies for instance. The males of that strain do show a bit of a green shine when the light hits the body. This can also happen with other colors, of course... Aging can change the density (less or more, but mostly less) of the chromatophores, which means that underlaying colors can come through or not.
 
Silverleaf209
  • Thread Starter
  • #8
Agreed about him just “earning his stripes” so to speak. Got a pic?

Watching them color up, especially late bloomers, is always fun. My boy Oliver took almost a year to achieve his full and final look. When I brought him indoors from an outdoor greenwater pond he was a beautiful grey/olive drab half and half (hence Oliver)

Now he’s half black with a glorious double sword / spade tail with a purple / blue iridescence (he’s an Endler) I miss his drab coloration a bit. I keep mine in high brackish and he looked like a perfect little marine fish scooting among the algaes. Oh well, give it a year or so.
No but I will work on it!
This happen to me before, my guppy started to turn green as it got older, I love to Hear if this guppy gets any more colors
Okay thanks for you help!
Also when we speak about full grown guppies, there still can be underlaying colors present. Such underneath colors can be shown when the light hits the body or when aging. The density of the chromatophores can change when aging. When the density gets less, the underlaying color can show up more. And this underlaying color in combination with the older second color, can make a different shine on the body. But this all has got to do with the dominant and recessive colors that they carry.
Dominant traits (like e.g., colors) can als be divided into dominant, double dominant and triple dominant. The same goes for recessive traits. Also the grade of the dominant and recessive trait, will decide wether a trait will be visible or not.
A fish has three layers of skin. Most (so, not all) recessive colors are in the second layer of skin. Depending on the density of the blue colors cells (guanine), the colors in the second layer "can" be shown as well or not. In case they can be shown, it will make a different color or shine in the appearance. Like blue (as being in the top layer with a lesser density and yellow in the second layer, makes a green appearance. Like Japan blue guppies for instance. The males of that strain do show a bit of a green shine when the light hits the body. This can also happen with other colors, of course...
Thats cool but right now I am only seeing black on him!
 
Silverleaf209
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
Here is the picture!
20220719_180742.jpg
20220719_180729.jpg
 

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