Guppies with danio fry?

justintree3

Member
Hello,
So here's my thing: I've got a 55 gallon tank that needs some re-stocking, and we were going to add some guppies by way of breeding them in a 10 gallon tank (the kids love that sort of thing).

While cycling the tank, I threw some gross gravel vacuum water from the 55 gallon tank into it to speed up the cycle. It worked, but I must have gotten some danio eggs along with the waste, so now I have four danio fry in the 10 gallon. They survived the cycling process (tough little guys), and we need a couple more danios for the 55, so we are doing our best to keep them alive.

But they are taking too long to grow to a size where I'd be comfortable putting them in with the angelfish.

So what I'm wondering is whether or not it would be feasible to breed guppies in a tank with semi-grown danio fry (they're just under an inch long now). Would the fry just chow down on the guppy fry? There's only four of them...would some guppies be likely to survive? (it's not heavily planted - but there is some fairly large water lettuce giving a decent amount of cover).

I know impatience is what probably kills the most fish in this hobby, but man. Just got back from the pet store and they have some really nice looking guppies that I'm having to talk myself out of going back and buying now (so I need you to tell me that I'm an idiot for even considering this, don't I dare buy those guppies).
 

Crimson_687

Member
It may take a month or so for the guppies to settle in and start breeding, and then a bit longer for the fry to be birthed. Depending on how fast your danio grow, they may be big enough to add with the angelfish, or not.

Fry are about 6 mm in length. If the Danios mouth is similar to this size, or similar to the mouth size of a guppy (parents often mistake their own fry for food) then your danios may be a problem.

It may not be the best solution, but one thing you can do is invest in a net breeder. This will keep fry safe from both danios and guppy parents, meaning none will be eaten. However, nets are not always the best option and you must make sure they get circulation.

You can also add floating plants for the fry to hide in and feed from. Hornwort is especially good, but there are many others. Of course, having floating plants won’t mean that none are eaten, but having them will reduce how many fry are eaten.
 
  • Thread Starter

justintree3

Member
That's pretty much what I figured.

Thanks!
 
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