Growing Moss on Wire Mesh Question 

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Dan123

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Hi Fishlore,

Just wondered, how do you grow Moss when you get it and it is attached to Wire Mesh? Do you just place it in the tank where you want it and wait for it to grow over the mesh and carpet out? I have some Spiky Moss on top of my slate and some Fissidens Fontanus on the substrate. Would these grow?

Dan.
 

Aquarist

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Good morning,

If the mesh is wire, make sure it is stainless steel or it will rust and many cause harm to your fish. I would replace wire with an egg crate (like light covers) instead of wire or even a mesh as posted in the links below.

Some links you might find helpful:

https://www.fishlore.com/aquariumfishforum/threads/background-plants.59978/
Check out the video in post #4.

Links in this thread may help you:
https://www.fishlore.com/aquariumfishforum/threads/beautiful-aquatic-mosses.13524/



Ken
 

psalm18.2

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Plastic craft mesh works good. Moss can be sewn on with either fishing line or sowing thread.
 
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Dan123

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The mesh is stainless steel, so it would be okay to just go straight into the tank after cleaning? And will the moss just grow onto the rocks on its own?
 

Butterfly

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Stainless steel is fine for your tank. It won't rust or pollute your tank.

The moss will have to be held onto the rocks with something like cotton thread or rubber bands.
Carol
 

joncro55

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Stainless is called stainless for a reason and that is that it will remain stainless and will not rust, you are correct in that regard. Just be careful witht he edges when it comes to this stuff. It will really look great with moss growing on it and the fish will love it, but the edges can be really sharp of cut pieces. If it is the woven wire mesh that I am picturing, stuff like this, http://www.bwire.com/ , you can sand down the edges of even find a way to fold them back so they are not sharp.

As far as fastening the mesh to a rock, also try plastic wire ties, they are very strong and usually can do the job right...
 

daniel87

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Thanks for the advice, I was looking to do the same thing.
 

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Good morning,

I ran across an article recently concerning Stainless Steel and using salt in the aquarium. Salt will cause the Stainless Steel to rust and corrode. So if you are using both in your aquarium, then you may need another option besides Stainless Steel. If you do not use salt then the Stainless Steel should be fine.

It suggested to NOT use Stainless Steel in Saltwater Tanks period.

Too, Salt isn't necessary in a Freshwater Tank.

I do not recall where I saw the article and I do not have a link for it.

Ken

Edit:

Ryan found this information:


"Two of the most commonly used grades of Stainless Steel are Grade 304 and Grade 316 GRADE 304 has good corrosion resistance and is most commonly used for in-door applications. GRADE 316 has a higher level of corrosion resistance. The Grade 316 is often referred to as "marine grade" and typical applications include boat fittings and architectural components in exposed coastal locations and other salt water environments.

Note: Neither grade offers corrosion resistance if submerged in salt water."
 
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ryanr

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Respectfully - to all.

I have never come across stainless steel that can't be stained in some way!

Take a stainless steel frying pan.... how many are still spotless?
Stainless steel utensils (knives, forks) can be stained.

Stainless steel is a treated steel (chromium) that helps protect the steel against rust, but does not 100% prevent it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stainless_steel

The typical household grades of stainless steel can easily be stained/tainted, and IMO are not suitable for use in any aquarium, particularly if the wire has been cut, exposing the carbon steel to your water.

A much better solution (IMO) is to use fishing line, which is 100% inert.

EDIT: Off-topic, but was mentioned....I would certainly never contemplate putting any metal substance in my marine tank. For the sake of $3 of fishing line, versus the many thousands I have invested in the setup and live stock... no brainer.
 
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Dan123

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I have taken alot of advice off of Fishlore, but the other day decided the Mesh was going to go. I removed it from the aquarium for several reasons, one, being that as above I noticed my apparently stainless steel knives in the kitchen had an orange tinge aroung the join to the handle, stained. Secondly, the mesh did not seem suitable for any of the fish or shrimp I wish to keep, and as such for the sake of the fish it was removed. I have since tied the moss and fontanus onto pieces of slate and bogwood. The slate was filed smooth, incase anyone was wondering, and had sharper ledges knocked off with a hammer. It actually looks more natural now, and is even growing better. So, in all, that leaves me with a strong impression on tieing it down myself. For the sake of some fishing line and 5 minutes work fiddling with it, I now have a much nicer and safer look to my aquarium.

What I will also add is, if buying moss on wire mesh, go ahead. It arrives in better shape and is usually tied onto the mesh with fishing line, meaning that all you need to do is removing the line and moss, and reattach to desired location with line provided
 

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Good morning,

I'm glad that you removed the wire just to be on the safe side! We'd love to see some photos if it's possible!

Ken
 
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Dan123

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I can post photos indeed, however I added two more pieces of wood to the tank yesterday and so at the moment the water is a little bit coloured and much harder to see. I wil post some pictures when I can, probably in a few days it would have been sooner but I was searching for that piece of wood that just pinged in the tank and finally got it yesterday at my LFS for £3.00! Bargain if you ask me.
 

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when shooting in tannin rich water, if the color interferes with your shot, try using a shorter wavelength light source, like fluorescent as opposed to tungsten, or like a lightly blue toned bulb. Tannins reflect at the mid to long (yellow and orange) wavelengths of visible light, if you can provide more light at the other end of the spectrum, it'll help your pictures show less of the tannins. However, this is only with film. I have no idea how digital works, but it doesn't seem to have very much to do with actual light, as far as I can tell.

a silver blue studio reflection umbrella can work pretty well, too, in a pinch, but they're a pain in the butt.
 
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