Green Star Polyp Ok To Frag On Sand?

vikingpillage89
Member
Just got my first coral and just layed the frag plug on the sand is that fine?? It is currently closed and **** off. Being I just got it.
20190525_173029.jpg
 
stella1979
Member
Congratulations!! Don't worry, this is totally normal after a tank transfer.

Oh! It's also fine to place the frag plug in the sand for the short term. Eventually, the coral should grow and will grow beyond the border of the plug. It will not grow on sand so keeping it there too long will stall growth.
 
  • Thread Starter
vikingpillage89
Member
stella1979 said:
Congratulations!! Don't worry, this is totally normal after a tank transfer.
Is it fine to leave on sand will he still grow ?

stella1979 said:
Congratulations!! Don't worry, this is totally normal after a tank transfer.

Oh! It's also fine to place the frag plug in the sand for the short term. Eventually, the coral should grow and will grow beyond the border of the plug. It will not grow on sand so keeping it there too long will stall growth.
If I plant in the sand like next to the rock agould that work I might have to clip the plug to lay it flat on rocks because I have no holes big enough. And are you absolutely sure green star won't grow on sand?
 
stella1979
Member
He will grow to cover the surface of the plug... and yes, I'm certain he won't grow over sand.

Leaving him in the sand, but putting the plug right up against the rock, will allow him to eventually encrust onto the rock. However, encrusting corals like GSP will spread in every direction (just not on sand) so... if you want to give him the best growth potential, it would be best if rock were on every side of the plug.

This is not important for the time being and that is because the coral is acclimating right now. My rule of thumb is not to touch coral unless and until absolutely necessary. Simply because we should anger them as little as possible since we want them to grow, grow, grow. So, leave him alone for now and in the meantime, consider where the final placement will be. Some things you should know...
  • GSP is considered invasive by some because it's possible the growth rate will really explode, meaning, it can grow faster than other corals. Add to it that corals each have their own 'sting', a defense mechanism for survival, and GSP is quite capable of hurting other corals and even growing right over them. So, if it grows fast and can take out other corals on its path... you could end up with a GSP garden that is bigger than you wish it to be. You can google GSP takeover to see what I mean. For this reason, some people choose to isolate GSP on its own 'island'. This means growing it on a rock that is separate from the main scape, with sand all around that rock so the GSP can't make the jump.
  • As much as we want to be careful and delicate, corals are hardier than most give them credit for. If you want it off that plug so you can attach just the coral where you want it, then carefully slide a sharp new razor between the mat and the plug. You may then use superglue (cyanoacrylate based, usually found in most gel superglues... you can find this in Gorilla Glue Gel or even in gel superglue at the dollar store... just check the label) and just glue the coral where you want it. Btw... as proof, I have deplugged nearly every coral in my tank. This is a stressor on the coral, of course, so I do not deplug right away. Instead, when freshly added to my tank, I leave them on plugs until they show signs of happiness. This could be a week to a month but either way, a week or two after I see the coral has been comfortable in my tank, I get the razors and superglue and go to work getting them attached.
  • I've seen lots of examples of GSP growing quite happily on glass. So, if you want a lawn on the background or a side glass, just glue him there.
 
  • Thread Starter
vikingpillage89
Member
stella1979 said:
He will grow to cover the surface of the plug... and yes, I'm certain he won't grow over sand.

Leaving him in the sand, but putting the plug right up against the rock, will allow him to eventually encrust onto the rock. However, encrusting corals like GSP will spread in every direction (just not on sand) so... if you want to give him the best growth potential, it would be best if rock were on every side of the plug.

This is not important for the time being and that is because the coral is acclimating right now. My rule of thumb is not to touch coral unless and until absolutely necessary. Simply because we should anger them as little as possible since we want them to grow, grow, grow. So, leave him alone for now and in the meantime, consider where the final placement will be. Some things you should know...
  • GSP is considered invasive by some because it's possible the growth rate will really explode, meaning, it can grow faster than other corals. Add to it that corals each have their own 'sting', a defense mechanism for survival, and GSP is quite capable of hurting other corals and even growing right over them. So, if it grows fast and can take out other corals on its path... you could end up with a GSP garden that is bigger than you wish it to be. You can google GSP takeover to see what I mean. For this reason, some people choose to isolate GSP on its own 'island'. This means growing it on a rock that is separate from the main scape, with sand all around that rock so the GSP can't make the jump.
  • As much as we want to be careful and delicate, corals are hardier than most give them credit for. If you want it off that plug so you can attach just the coral where you want it, then carefully slide a sharp new razor between the mat and the plug. You may then use superglue (cyanoacrylate based, usually found in most gel superglues... you can find this in Gorilla Glue Gel or even in gel superglue at the dollar store... just check the label) and just glue the coral where you want it. Btw... as proof, I have deplugged nearly every coral in my tank. This is a stressor on the coral, of course, so I do not deplug right away. Instead, when freshly added to my tank, I leave them on plugs until they show signs of happiness. This could be a week to a month but either way, a week or two after I see the coral has been comfortable in my tank, I get the razors and superglue and go to work getting them attached.
  • I've seen lots of examples of GSP growing quite happily on glass. So, if you want a lawn on the background or a side glass, just glue him there.
Thank you I'll be adding some rock next to it he has opened this morning all tho not all the way do they like flow because hes getting plenty ??

stella1979 said:
He will grow to cover the surface of the plug... and yes, I'm certain he won't grow over sand.

Leaving him in the sand, but putting the plug right up against the rock, will allow him to eventually encrust onto the rock. However, encrusting corals like GSP will spread in every direction (just not on sand) so... if you want to give him the best growth potential, it would be best if rock were on every side of the plug.

This is not important for the time being and that is because the coral is acclimating right now. My rule of thumb is not to touch coral unless and until absolutely necessary. Simply because we should anger them as little as possible since we want them to grow, grow, grow. So, leave him alone for now and in the meantime, consider where the final placement will be. Some things you should know...
  • GSP is considered invasive by some because it's possible the growth rate will really explode, meaning, it can grow faster than other corals. Add to it that corals each have their own 'sting', a defense mechanism for survival, and GSP is quite capable of hurting other corals and even growing right over them. So, if it grows fast and can take out other corals on its path... you could end up with a GSP garden that is bigger than you wish it to be. You can google GSP takeover to see what I mean. For this reason, some people choose to isolate GSP on its own 'island'. This means growing it on a rock that is separate from the main scape, with sand all around that rock so the GSP can't make the jump.
  • As much as we want to be careful and delicate, corals are hardier than most give them credit for. If you want it off that plug so you can attach just the coral where you want it, then carefully slide a sharp new razor between the mat and the plug. You may then use superglue (cyanoacrylate based, usually found in most gel superglues... you can find this in Gorilla Glue Gel or even in gel superglue at the dollar store... just check the label) and just glue the coral where you want it. Btw... as proof, I have deplugged nearly every coral in my tank. This is a stressor on the coral, of course, so I do not deplug right away. Instead, when freshly added to my tank, I leave them on plugs until they show signs of happiness. This could be a week to a month but either way, a week or two after I see the coral has been comfortable in my tank, I get the razors and superglue and go to work getting them attached.
  • I've seen lots of examples of GSP growing quite happily on glass. So, if you want a lawn on the background or a side glass, just glue him there.
Also do you know if my clownfish can sleep even with the flow does he just swim in his sleep? Lol
 
stella1979
Member
GSP does like flow.

Haha... yes, the clown will find his comfy rest area but they do not really bed down like some other fish do. You can trust him to take care of things in this regard.
 
  • Thread Starter
vikingpillage89
Member
stella1979 said:
GSP does like flow.

Haha... yes, the clown will find his comfy rest area but they do not really bed down like some other fish do. You can trust him to take care of things in this regard.
Thanks I love him his name is Murdock lol thanks stella he ate mysis shrimp today hes doing well.
 

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