Gourami fish

aquagirllover

Member
Just wondering about basic GouramI behavior and if my local PetCo got it right. I was told not to put more than a pair Of Goiramis together that they would be too aggressive, and I have to turkey baster feed them? Also are they shrimp safe? Can you put two different species of GoiramI together?
 

jinjerJOSH22

Member
Dependent on species, tank size and personality of the individual fish. Some species can generally co exist but it's usually not recommended to mix them. You shouldn't have to use a baster outside fry or perhaps more rare smaller Gourami.
Do you have a specific species in mind?
 

HDavid

Member
Depends on tank size and species. If you keep multiple you should keep only one male. Dwarfs, pearls can be kept in a pair, 3 spots, kissings, and blue’s get around 6 inches, paradise goiramies are best alone( mean) bust best looking(imho) snakeskins and giants get 12+. The small ones can be kept with shrimp, but if it can eat it it will.
 

JettsPapa

Member
I've had a male and two female pearl gouramis in one of my tanks for a month or so and haven't had any aggression problems. One will half-heartedly chase another occasionally, but not enough to be a problem.

And this is the first time I've heard anything about feeding them with a turkey baster.
 

PascalKrypt

Member
You'll receive very different answers depending on the species.
Why don't you post a picture or name of the gouramI you have in mind and we can tell you a little more about them.

(All the ones you'll find at petco are as easy to feed as betta or guppies, don't worry about messing with a baster)
 

Noroomforshoe

Member
most GouramI are territorial, top dwelling, fish, you do not want to put other territorial top dwelling fish in a tank with them, including other gouramis. and other fish, especially other top dwelling species, need to be carefully chosen.
It is not the best idea to have more than one gouramI species in a tank. If you want a pair, you may need to ask them to order a female. The males are much more common, as females are kind of drab. 2 males need a lot more room, and are still likely to fight.
They should eat with no problems, what species were you looking at that they said they need to be spot fed? Were they sparkling gourami? Croaking gourami?

Some species are a lot less aggressive then others. the moonlight and the pearl are notably less aggressive I had over the years 4 pairs "seperatly," that turned out to be 2 males , 3 of those times, they stayed together like best buds their entire life. the third time, one had to be rehomed.
Honey gourami, croaking, and sparkling are other less aggressive species.
 

JettsPapa

Member
Noroomforshoe said:
If you want a pair, you may need to ask them to order a female. The males are much more common, as females are kind of drab.
Pearl gouramI females aren't as colorful as the males, but I wouldn't call them drab, and they're commonly available (at least in my part of the world).
 

MissNoodle

Member
Dwarf should be treated like bettas. Solo. Females are rare to find. Males should not be housed with other males or other gouramI species.

Honeys are social.

Sparkling are social. Very small though.

Some of the larger ones are social, but not super familiar with them.
 

PascalKrypt

Member
Noroomforshoe said:
most GouramI are territorial, top dwelling, fish, you do not want to put other territorial top dwelling fish in a tank with them, including other gouramis. and other fish, especially other top dwelling species, need to be carefully chosen.
It is not the best idea to have more than one gouramI species in a tank. If you want a pair, you may need to ask them to order a female. The males are much more common, as females are kind of drab. 2 males need a lot more room, and are still likely to fight.
They should eat with no problems, what species were you looking at that they said they need to be spot fed? Were they sparkling gourami? Croaking gourami?

Some species are a lot less aggressive then others. the moonlight and the pearl are notably less aggressive I had over the years 4 pairs "seperatly," that turned out to be 2 males , 3 of those times, they stayed together like best buds their entire life. the third time, one had to be rehomed.
Honey gourami, croaking, and sparkling are other less aggressive species.
This information is too glossing, hence why we need to know what species OP is considering.
Virtually none of the general gouramI information applies to honeys. They can be kept in any group size and mix peacefully with even other territorial species. It is important though to make sure that you buy true honeys as thick-lipped are hard to tell apart in the pet shops if you aren't already closely familiar with them and notoriously often sold as honeys.
Sparkling are not quite as friendly as honeys but are not very aggressive either and due to their small size should not be mixed with larger species in general.

The "females are drab" applies only to dwarf gouramI and to wildcolour honeys (which are pretty much never sold at petco). For all other species colouration is exactly or nearly the same between the genders.

Croaking gouramI are actually quite aggressive, and better labeled similar to three-spots. Don't mix two males with a female in a less-than-huge tank or they may kill one another.

Pearl sororities are an option if you want a larger group of one of the larger species with minimal risk of infighting.

You can actually successfully mix several species of gouramI but there are particular ways to do it, and it is best left to more experienced owners.
 
  • Thread Starter

aquagirllover

Member
I wanted to have a honey and chocolate gouramI 20 gallon long planted tank. He also said Gouramis are cichlids?? Is this true?
 

jinjerJOSH22

Member
aquagirllover said:
I wanted to have a honey and chocolate gouramI 20 gallon long planted tank. He also said Gouramis are cichlids?? Is this true?
No, it's not.
Chocolate GouramI really need specialist setups, they come from peat swamps where pH can be as low as 3 or 4 and virtually no dissolved solids in the water. While captive bred fish are usually more adaptable it's advised to replicate these conditions with pH generally under 7 and TDS as close to zero as possible.
I imagine it's Sphaerichthys Osphromenoids which I believe is on the more aggressive side.

Edit: GouramI are from the family Osphronemidae while Cichlids are Cichlidae.
 

PascalKrypt

Member
jinjerJOSH22 said:
No, it's not.
Chocolate GouramI really need specialist setups, they come from peat swamps where pH can be as low as 3 or 4 and virtually no dissolved solids in the water. While captive bred fish are usually more adaptable it's advised to replicate these conditions with pH generally under 7 and TDS as close to zero as possible.
I imagine it's Sphaerichthys Osphromenoids which I believe is on the more aggressive side.

Edit: GouramI are from the family Osphronemidae while Cichlids are Cichlidae.
This.
If you keep chocolates in a normal set-up (with any PH over 6 really) you'll 90% end up with dead chocolates before the year is out. The pet stores can't often keep them alive for more than a few weeks either. Skip them, they are rated as very advanced keeping. I know it's tempting though, they are very beautiful

Honeys are great though, 3-6 of them in a 20 long would be beautiful.

GouramI are related to bettas, paradise fish, climbing perches and pikeheads. What they all have in common is a labyrinth organ that allows them to breathe air at the surface, which means they can survive in water with very low oxygen content. They also tend to reproduce in similar fashion, utilising either bubble nests or mouthbrooding for their eggs, and having very small, often slow-growing offspring. Most gouramI species are known for aggression, and most are on the smaller side compared to cichlids. Their bodies are usually either disk or torpedo-shaped or somewhere in between. Most GouramI (and labyrinths in general) are recognisable from their ventral fins (the ones below their body at the front), which are elongated and narrow and in many GouramI species function as a sensory tool.

Cichlids are as unrelated to gouramI as tetras are. They are generally divided in African and South-American cichlids. They are generally known for being aggressive and territorial, and keeping them often involves keeping single pairs or mixing large groups of them in a method referred to as 'crowded' that dampens aggression. Many of the larger as well as the most colourful ornamental fish species are cichlids, which makes them so popular to keep. Common reproductive methods include mouthbrooding and sticking eggs to surfaces near the bottom or mid-level (in caves, on stones, on plants) and they may or may not guard young fry, which some species exhibiting high levels of parental care where fry live for weeks or even months looked after by their parents. Cichlids often have large mouths and bulky bodies, while some of the South-American cichlids are disk-shaped. (Might not be 100% accurate, I'm not really into the group as a whole)

Basically these are just two groups from the well known ornamental groups of fish. Others include Chararins (tetras), Cyprinids (carp-like, e.g. barbs, danios), Catfish, Loaches, Killifish, Livebearers, Rainbowfish, etc.
 
  • Thread Starter

aquagirllover

Member
I also just bought an Amano shrimp last night and acclimated him properly drip and temp all that good stuff he shed... right away last night I woke up and he had done it is that a good sign???
 

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