Good Reptile For 10 Gallon Tank?

adh/smile
  • #1
Hey guys,

I have an old 10 gallon tank that I used as a fish tank, but I upgraded my fish to a larger tank. Now I have this empty tank sitting in my closet and I think it's a real shame that I don't have an animal in it.

I was thinking of turning it into another betta tank or dwarf gourami but I already have so many fish. I would like to broaden my experience with the animals I keep, I was thinking of an axolotl, but turns out my parents won't let me get one.

Is there a reptile (turtle, snake, lizard, gecko, etc.) that could live in a 10 gallon tank? This is completely the beginning of my research. I'm not even sure if my parents will allow me to get a different animal besides fish. I'm just curious what's available for me.

Thanks guys!
 
Mike1995
  • #2
I had a green anole in a ten gallon tank at one point. Many reptiles have the potential to get quite large so don't buy a bearded dragon or anything like that
 
Niki Rose
  • #3
The only reptiles I can think would be suitable would be frogs, a young Pac-man frog would work though they are not very active and their adult size (size of dinner plate) would need a lot more room.

Most reptiles will need a live food source so it may not be the best choice if your parents don't like containers of fruit flies, mealworms, crickets or roaches in the house.
 
adh/smile
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
I like the look of the green anole. I will research more about that.

I prefer lizards, snakes, or geckos to frogs. Large frogs get ugly in my opinion. I like smaller frogs that remain small and cute for their whole lives. A frog the size of a dinner plate in my opinion is hideous!

I've been doing a little research on the best beginner lizard and the crested gecko seems like a really easy beginner. Is there anyone who's kept this gecko in a 10 gallon?
 
GuppyGuy007
  • #5
I don' know if it helps you, but I have 2 hermit crabs in a ten gallon who are doing great.
 
Niki Rose
  • #6
African dwarf frogs are an option too and you could do at least 4-5 in a 10gal , care will also be easy since you will already know the basics from keeping fish and can also use any spare equipment you already have rather than spending hundreds on non aquatic. I don't know much about crested gekos but my sister has kept many animals from frogs, gekos, lizards, snakes, tarantulas to crabs and she had a 10gal setup for hers. You may need to get a 20gal for an adult though
 
Fashooga
  • #7
The only reptiles I can think would be suitable would be frogs, a young Pac-man frog would work though they are not very active and their adult size (size of dinner plate) would need a lot more room.

Most reptiles will need a live food source so it may not be the best choice if your parents don't like containers of fruit flies, mealworms, crickets or roaches in the house.

Don’t thing frogs would qualify reptiles as they are amphibians.
 
Niki Rose
  • #8
Don’t thing frogs would qualify reptiles as they are amphibians.
Oh yeah oops! well its late here so I have an excuse to get things wrong
 
adh/smile
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
Hermit crabs are a cute idea! I will research them. I really like the idea of some kind of lizard or gecko best.

I've been researching about crested geckos and so far it sounds like they don't need anything that expensive. I could turn my 10 gallon tank upright, buy (or make my own) front-facing lid, and do the special requirements for humidity and food. It sounds like, from my research, they are fine with room temperature as long as it is between low 60s - low, mid 70s through the night and day. Has anyone else had experience keeping them?

I don't think I like frogs enough to buy them.
 
Kysarkel000
  • #10
You could do a cool species of praying mantis, walking stick, or leaf bug!!
 
adh/smile
  • Thread Starter
  • #11
Eugh...thanks for the suggestion, but I've owned walking sticks before and DID NOT LIKE THEM! We had one that grew to 6 inches and had TONS of babies all by itself. We have no idea how it did that because we only had one, but my dad finally put his foot down and dumped them outside on our sidewalk and squashed them all with his boot. Bad experience with walking sticks.

I'm not a fan of insects, bugs, beetles, spiders, or anything creepy crawly like them. I'm not afraid of them, but owning one as a pet is just a little much for me. And I know my parents will absolutely say NO, so I'm still trying to figure out if I can even get something else.
 
FriarThomasIII
  • #12
Eugh...thanks for the suggestion, but I've owned walking sticks before and DID NOT LIKE THEM! We had one that grew to 6 inches and had TONS of babies all by itself. We have no idea how it did that because we only had one, but my dad finally put his foot down and dumped them outside on our sidewalk and squashed them all with his boot. Bad experience with walking sticks.

I'm not a fan of insects, bugs, beetles, spiders, or anything creepy crawly like them. I'm not afraid of them, but owning one as a pet is just a little much for me. And I know my parents will absolutely say NO, so I'm still trying to figure out if I can even get something else.
Late, but how about a Steppe Runner? I'm finding something for my 10 gallon as well as being a first time reptile owner (maybe soon). They are supposed to be very friendly and easy to keep. If not, what did you end up putting in there?
 
Fishbeard
  • #13
I've heard that crested geckos do well in a 10 gallon, and they are also supposed to be great beginner reptiles. They also eat a prepared diet, which solves your bug problem.

I keep my leopard gecko in a 20 long, and she is a happy camper. If you upgrade to a 20G ($20 at dollar per gallon!), I'd definitely recommend one! They are a great beginner reptile. I got mine when I was 16, and she put up with all my nonsense.

Please make sure you do your research before buying any reptile, since their requirements aren't as easy to generalize as community fish. There's tons of information on YouTube, for example, about most species that are available.

I would try to find a reptile show, breeder or specialized shop near you to purchase any reptile. The big box stores have a terrible reputation when it comes to reptiles, and you'll have better luck getting a healthy animal.
 
adh/smile
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
Late, but how about a Steppe Runner? I'm finding something for my 10 gallon as well as being a first time reptile owner (maybe soon). They are supposed to be very friendly and easy to keep. If not, what did you end up putting in there?
I actually haven't been able to put anything in it so far. My parents have said no to any kind of reptile while I'm still living at home. So until I get my own place, I am going to have to stick with fish and since I already have a 30 gallon fish tank, I decided not to have another 10 gallon fish tank. Especially with the increasing amount of school that I will be going through in the next couple years (graduating and going to college, AH!) It's probably best that I keep one tank so my parents are not overwhelmed by having to care for them while I'm gone.

I've heard that crested geckos do well in a 10 gallon, and they are also supposed to be great beginner reptiles. They also eat a prepared diet, which solves your bug problem.

I keep my leopard gecko in a 20 long, and she is a happy camper. If you upgrade to a 20G ($20 at dollar per gallon!), I'd definitely recommend one! They are a great beginner reptile. I got mine when I was 16, and she put up with all my nonsense.

Please make sure you do your research before buying any reptile, since their requirements aren't as easy to generalize as community fish. There's tons of information on YouTube, for example, about most species that are available.

I would try to find a reptile show, breeder or specialized shop near you to purchase any reptile. The big box stores have a terrible reputation when it comes to reptiles, and you'll have better luck getting a healthy animal.
When I get my own place and if I'm still in the market for a reptile I will certainly look into specialized breeders or reptile shows. I agree, big chain pet stores are the worst places for animals. From my research crested geckos do well in 10 gallons only when they're babies so it's easier for them to find food. When they reach adult hood I think they should be in an upright 20 gall. My cousin has a leopard gecko and she is supper cute!
 
JLeeM
  • #15
I know it's a bit late since you're waiting until later in life, but I really like long tailed lizards, Takydromus sexlineatus, something unusual.
 
adh/smile
  • Thread Starter
  • #16
I know it's a bit late since you're waiting until later in life, but I really like long tailed lizards, Takydromus sexlineatus, something unusual.
Even though I am waiting till later to get a reptile, I still LOVE researching animals and learning more about how to care for them properly. Thanks for the suggestion!
 
BReefer97
  • #17
I've heard that crested geckos do well in a 10 gallon, and they are also supposed to be great beginner reptiles. They also eat a prepared diet, which solves your bug problem.

I keep my leopard gecko in a 20 long, and she is a happy camper. If you upgrade to a 20G ($20 at dollar per gallon!), I'd definitely recommend one! They are a great beginner reptile. I got mine when I was 16, and she put up with all my nonsense.

Please make sure you do your research before buying any reptile, since their requirements aren't as easy to generalize as community fish. There's tons of information on YouTube, for example, about most species that are available.

I would try to find a reptile show, breeder or specialized shop near you to purchase any reptile. The big box stores have a terrible reputation when it comes to reptiles, and you'll have better luck getting a healthy animal.

Just wanted to pop on here and say a 10 gallon tank is not okay for a crested gecko. They need a vertical enclosure that’s at the very very least 12x12x24. A baby crested gecko would be okay in a converted 10 gallon tank, but certainly not an adult. And conversion kits for 10 gallon tanks aren’t worth their price, you might as well buy a ZooMed or ExoTerra terrarium that’s more appropriate for its price range.

And even reptile shows and expos have HORRIBLE sellers. You yourself have to use your judgement and that’s what it comes down to. A petco/PetSmart animal may sometimes be healthier than one bought from a breeder at a reptile show. I’ve seen many bad reptiles for sale. The only thing you need to do to sell reptiles at most reptile shows is sign up and get a table. You could be buying from anyone and they could be completely clueless about the animals they’re breeding and selling. You should know the care of the animal you’re looking to buy beforehand and ask questions about what it’s been eating and how it’s been cared for up until you buying it. If you notice the diet or something isn’t what you’ve learned in your research, HUGE red flag. For example, I bought a baby crested gecko from a breeder at a reptile show without asking what he feeds his babies - turns out he fed them baby food. In turn, I bought a gecko with metabolic bone disease because baby food doesn’t have the correct amount of vitamins, nutrients and calcium as a Crested Gecko Diet would (Pangea or Repashy). The baby gecko is overall okay in my care, but as a breeder myself - I can’t use him in any of my projects because MBD may end up being passed on.
 
Gamer
  • #18
Yup, for baby juvy a 12x12x18 is great choice.

When it gets to be an adult, then and only then more likely will need an 18x18x18 or 18x18x24.

Normally with fish and stuff, I never am a fan of upgrading later on. With reptiles it's a different, most any one I have kept needed a small tank to start off with and then a "for life" later on. They can have too little space as adults, and too much space as babies.
 

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