good ph or not

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ryanr

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As a general rule, most captivity bred tropical fish will adapt and live in a wide range of pH.

Wild caught fish may struggle, but if acclimated properly should also adapt.

pH tends to mainly affect breeding of fish, whereby there is a higher chance of success when parameters in the preferred range for the species.

Also, it is much easier to acclimate fish to higher pH's than it is to bring them into more acidic waters.
 
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silver beard

Member
Thanks a Million
 
  • Thread Starter

silver beard

Member
Would a school of 5 be okay
 

Nutter

Member
7.6 should be fine unless the fish are wild caught. A school of 5 would be fine though I would probably go for 8 in your tank.
 
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ryanr

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Umm, I'm not great on stocking suggestions.

Most tetras are generally pretty peaceful, and a small shoal of 4 or more bleeding hearts is recommended.

They can be fin nippers, so not sure how they'd go with your other stock

edit: by Nutter
 
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silver beard

Member
Do you think 8 would be okay stocking wise
 
  • Moderator

ryanr

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Nutter said:
7.6 should be fine unless the fish are wild caught. A school of 5 would be fine though I would probably go for 8 in your tank.
silver beard said:
Do you think 8 would be okay stocking wise
I think Nutter has answered that
 

Nutter

Member
8 would be fine. You have the space for them bioload wise & your filters are up to the task. 8 will also have them concentrating on each other more rather than your other fish becasue like Ryan says they can get a bit nippy.
 
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silver beard

Member
Thank you all, I believe I will get some next time I visit my lfs

Should I get 8 all at once or only 4 at a time so it won't mess up the bacteria in the filters

Merged back to back posts.
Ken
 
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ryanr

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I would get all 8 if they are still small (juveniles).

They will have strength in numbers, and will more easily establish their 'pecking' order.

Your current setup should deal with the extra bio-load quite quickly (about a week max probably).

Just keep an eye on your ammonia readings, and if they rise, just perform a water change to reduce the concentrations.

If possible use Seachem Prime or Amquel+/Nova+ as your water conditioner.
 
  • Thread Starter

silver beard

Member
Thanks, sounds good
 

ikme17

Member
Back to the pH question... I have four Bleeding Hearts in my tank. They are healthy and hardy (surviving 3 major moves, temperatures at around 60 degrees for months, etc). The pH of the water here is just about as high as it goes. From my personal experience, Bleeding Hearts should do fine in hard water. They're a good-looking, tough little fish.
 
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silver beard

Member
Cool
 

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