Goldfish Questions

Discussion in 'Breeding Fish' started by Somthing creative, Jun 25, 2018.

  1. Somthing creativeValued MemberMember

    I recently Have been looking at some goldfish. I haven’t had them since I was younger but now own a few guppies. I was looking at goldfish and it says they get quite big ( the ones I saw) and I wanted to ask if a ten gallon would be to small a tank for one. If not would it be to small to possibly breed two goldfish. Farther more I was wondering if it would over populate my tank if I left then in with the eggs. I know guppies have tendencies to eat there fry and that keeps my tank from major over population. Would it be the same for a small goldfish?
     
  2. Freshwater-Freshman

    Freshwater-FreshmanValued MemberMember

    The general rule of keeping fancy goldfish is 20 gallons for the first goldfish, and then an additional 10 gallons for eat goldfish added. Common goldfish need ponds.
     
  3. GoldFiska

    GoldFiskaWell Known MemberMember

    The 20 gallon rule is outdated, go for 30 gallons for the first fish and 10 gallons for each additional (for fancies only).

    If you let 2 goldfish breed and leave the eggs, all the fry will be eaten.

    If you want to breed and keep fry, keep in mind that these are not fish that can be thrown into a small tank and fed flakes and be expected to develop into healthy beautiful fish. You must do a lot of research and get a large aquarium to maintain pristine water quality.
     




  4. scarface

    scarfaceFishlore VIPMember

    Not true. If so, then I suppose so do a lot of other aquarium fish—such as arowanas, common plecos, Oscars, Kissing gouramie, and other fish that get larger than goldfish, which are typically kept in aquariums just fine.
     
  5. Discus-Tang

    Discus-TangWell Known MemberMember

    Agreed, they are very messy and more demanding than you'd think. Make sure you buy fantail goldfish (2 tails, looks like a butterfly from above). if you get the common variety you will have built a pond by the end of the year, along with a serious case of MTS.
     




  6. GoldFiska

    GoldFiskaWell Known MemberMember

    Oops! I think you are getting your fancy goldfish mixed up.
    All fancies have 2 tails, but only butterfly telescopes have the butterfly tail from above. Other fancies, including the fantail, do not.
    But I do agree that with any tank, you’ll get a serious case of MTS;)
     
  7. Discus-Tang

    Discus-TangWell Known MemberMember

    I have a plain fantail whose tail resembles a butterfly from the top.
     
  8. Gypsy13

    Gypsy13Fishlore VIPMember

    I sure wish someone would tell my sarassa comets they’re supposed to eat their own eggs/fry. Anyone. Cause they sure aren’t listening to me. Same with the guppies. I had to get danios for that!

    The problem isn’t only a case of size my friend. Because they have no stomach, it’s literally food-poo-food-poo. Not a little poo. Lots and lots of poo. I’ve got mine in a pond I’m having to make bigger now. If I can’t rehome some, we’re looking at digging a small lake in the field. Don’t wanna. I’m talking commons, comets etc. They’re incredibly messy and destructive. Seriously, when I go out to feed them the water is rolling with open mouths. The only plants they’ve left me is hornwort and parrots feather. They LOOK for trouble.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 25, 2018
  9. scarface

    scarfaceFishlore VIPMember

    They do poo a lot even if they haven't been fed in a while. So where does all this extra excrement coming from? Not many fish I know constantly swim around and open and close their mouths. What are they doing? The only other fish I know that do this are Kissing gouramies, and they do it because they're filter feeding. I think goldfish do this for the same reason, which may explain the huge amount of waste that doesn't seem to correlate to how much we feed them. So I can see how people think that goldfish have huge amounts of bioload compared to fish of the same size. But is this true? I don't know; I haven't seen any studies done on it. For now, it's just a theory.
     
  10. Gypsy13

    Gypsy13Fishlore VIPMember

    Just from my personal experience, their bioload is not only heavy but fast. My apple snails and common plecos had nothing on them. In the pond I have a power mechanical/biologist filter with uv AND a bog pond half the size of the pond. I have to backwash the filter at least weekly. The plants in the bog pond newly planted this year are huge. I still have to physically remove solids churned up by the air stones. Finpigs.
     
  11. scarface

    scarfaceFishlore VIPMember

    I know what you mean. I wish I bought a bigger canister filter. It's a mess when I open it up. But I feed mine in upwards of 6-8 times a day. I used to do 10, but they wouldn't even look at me after a week of that. Lol.

    They are the only fish I feed this way. Sure they'll do just fine with one or two feeding per day like my other fish, but I'm trying to grow them out big.
     
  12. GoldFiska

    GoldFiskaWell Known MemberMember

    Then you may have a fantail-butterfly cross of some sort because fantails are side view fish and are not supposed to have a butterfly tail, by the standard.
     
  13. OP
    OP
    S

    Somthing creativeValued MemberMember

    Thx for all the great advice. So what do you suggest I get instead. Again I haven’t had fish in a while other then my guppies and a mystery snail so I consider myself a beginner . Again I have a ten gallon but I also have a small nursery tank for my guppy babies. That is about a 2-5 gallon. (WE have had it a while and I can’t remember exactly) so what fish could live comfortably in that size tank. Also with your suggestions can you tell me if breeding would be a good idea
     
  14. Freshwater-Freshman

    Freshwater-FreshmanValued MemberMember

    If it is indeed a five gallon you could get a Betta, a pea puffer or a Scarlett Badis, but it's a squeeze and smaller tanks should be handled by more experienced people. $1 per gallon sale should be soon. Also I don't know of any fish that could be bred in a tank that small. Would snails interested you? Some rarer color forms have always interested me for my empty 5 gallon
     
  15. skilletlicker

    skilletlickerValued MemberMember

    What is MTS?
     
  16. scarface

    scarfaceFishlore VIPMember

    In this case, it means multiple tank syndrome. It’s a real thing, a real problem.

    Sometimes it might mean Malaysian Trumpet Snail. What is what is obviously dependent on the context of the sentence or conversation.
     
  17. OP
    OP
    S

    Somthing creativeValued MemberMember

    If I were to get a pea puffer for my ten gallon how many can I get. I assume it’s like two at max. And if so I don’t plan on breeding. Tho puffers do sound really cool!
     
  18. alykat

    alykatValued MemberMember

    I’ve bred pea puffers in tanks as small as 15 gallons. For a ten gallon tank I would recommend either just one pea, or at least 4/5. Diffusion of aggression is key with these little guys in my experience. Although the biggest factor is by far the individual personalities of each puffer.

    Just have a lot of decorations/plants to break up lines of sight and you should be fine. They are my all time favorite aquarium fish, and are well worth the extra tank planning
     
  19. Galathiel

    GalathielWell Known MemberMember

    I assume that you have no other fish in this 10 gallon?
     
  20. Freshwater-Freshman

    Freshwater-FreshmanValued MemberMember

    I've heard of people keeping 2 in a 10 gallon HEAVILY planted tank. But for me, one has enough personality. It depends on the puffers attitudes, but they shouldn't be kept with anything else
     




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