Goldfish Pond

Shoryuken_Shubunkin

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So I want to build a goldfish pond, but I can't find any consistent information on what kind of filtration I need or the size of the pond. I live in Jacksonville Florida where it gets really hot in the summer and in the lower 30's in the winter so I want to make sure I build it in the right place with adequate shade in the summer and so it catches the sun in the winter. I was wanting at least 4 shubunkin and two wakin and at least three fancies like ryukin and veiltails. Does anyone know how to help me?
 

maggie thecat

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Best rule of thumb is 50 gallons per fish. More is better, of course. You want a pump that will turn the water over several times an hour, so rated for at least 3 times your water volume.

Some of your aeration / filtration will come from plants. Hornwort and anacharis on the bottom. Jungle val in pots is good too. Water lilies and other potted plants, and then floating plants for shade.

Be aware that goldfish are rough on floating plants, they eat the roots off. Fortunately, they make enclosed planters (or you can make your own if you want to economize.)
 
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Shoryuken_Shubunkin

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maggie thecat said:
Best rule of thumb is 50 gallons per fish. More is better, of course. You want a pump that will turn the water over several times an hour, so rated for at least 3 times your water volume.

Some of your aeration / filtration will come from plants. Hornwort and anacharis on the bottom. Jungle val in pots is good too. Water lilies and other potted plants, and then floating plants for shade.

Be aware that goldfish are rough on floating plants, they eat the roots off. Fortunately, they make enclosed planters (or you can make your own if you want to economize.)
So about 450+ gallon pond with plants, would they be okay in the winter?
 

aussieJJDude

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I'd suggest something in the 500g range, but certainly more is better IMO. If you can, build a lot bigger as its common to get fry so plan a bit ahead now... unless you get all males/females.

For filtration, it really just depends on preferences and cost. Some great filters seem to be bog filters and external box filters. The best thing ks whatever you choose, pick a good pump and also consider how much maintainence you want and overall aesthetics. If you can, an integral drain will help remove waste on the bottom.


Id also reccomend not only going wide/long, but either consider having it heavily planted, hiding places and/or deep to give the fish some cooler areas to escape the heat if needed.
 

maggie thecat

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They should be. Goldfish are coldwater fish, and they sort of hibernate in the winter.

I am in zone 7, it gets to 0 and occassionally minus 5 in the winter. I put a pond deicer in mine, just to be on the safe side, but it was purely a precaution .
 

Mom2some

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There is a sub forum on Fishlore dedicated to ponds - you might find some good info there. As far as goldfish info - isn’t there a concern about fancy goldfish being able to get food if kept with regular goldfish?
 

OneLittleBubble

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Fancies shouldn't be with single tail/slim bodied goldfish the slim bodied ones will get to the food first and they also love to chase the fancies around. Its not a good idea just get one or the other you can't have both without problems.
 

Goldiemom

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Actually, fancies are too delicate for ponds and are not pond fish. I have comets, commons. And Shubunkins in mine. Fancies are solely aquarium fish.
 

aussieJJDude

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Goldiemom said:
Actually, fancies are too delicate for ponds and are not pond fish. I have comets, commons. And Shubunkins in mine. Fancies are solely aquarium fish.
Having fancies in a pond, i get what your saying. The vast majority of fancies don't do well, but the fantails, rykins, orandas and Tamasabas do quite well in pond settings.

But I do agree, sticking with commons is the best chance of success... but with some patience, you can also have fancies in a pond environment.
 

Goldiemom

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I live in Texas and have a small, 250 garden pond. I have a covered patio and this is is a patio pond. Anything out in the open should be at least 3’ deep for winterizing as the fish will hibernate at the bottom. Don’t feed at all if the temps drop below 40. Our winters in the south are much different then other parts of the country. We can alternate between 32 one day and 70 the next so feed according to temp. Don’t just stop feeding completely in the winter as they do up north. Good luck and have fun with your pond!
 

OneLittleBubble

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aussieJJDude said:
Having fancies in a pond, i get what your saying. The vast majority of fancies don't do well, but the fantails, rykins, orandas and Tamasabas do quite well in pond settings.

But I do agree, sticking with commons is the best chance of success... but with some patience, you can also have fancies in a pond environment.
You shouldn't keep them together though
 

aussieJJDude

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OneLittleBubble said:
You shouldn't keep them together though
Yeah, its frowned upon for obvious reasons. (Many do however....) for the health of all fish, it is best to keep them apart!
 

Goldiemom

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aussieJJDude said:
Having fancies in a pond, i get what your saying. The vast majority of fancies don't do well, but the fantails, rykins, orandas and Tamasabas do quite well in pond settings.

But I do agree, sticking with commons is the best chance of success... but with some patience, you can also have fancies in a pond environment.
We’ll have to agree to disagree on this one.
 

aussieJJDude

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Goldiemom said:
We’ll have to agree to disagree on this one.
Understood. I was very much in the same boat until I tried it for myself. If you ever set up another pond, consider trying fancies - you'll be surprised on how hardy many varities can be!
 
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