1 Gallon Tank GloFish Troubles

xxSTEPHENSxx
Member
Hey guys, I'm new to this forum and I really need some help. I just purchased a 1.77 gallon GloFish Starter Tank from PetSmart. My husband and I set up the tank according to the instruction manual. We tested the water for 3 days before introducing our GloFish into the tank. The first day and night the GloFish darted around and were antsy. However, the second night and day, the fish are staying towards the bottom of the tank and one of the bigger GloFish is panting a lot and also not wanting to eat. Now two of the fish are at the top of the water panting. Please help us figure out what we need to do to fix this problem.

The test strips that we use are Quick Dip Aquarium Multi-Test Kit and Ammonia Quick Dip Aquarium Test Strips. We also are using Topfin pH Decreaser and Topfin Water Conditioner. The fish food that came with the tank is Nutrafin Max Tropical Fish Flakes.

My husband and I have been reading over the forum and we recently learned about the Nitrogen Cycle process that we should have done before adding the fish. We did let the water circulate with the pump and lighting for 2-3 days. We also added the water conditioner and tested the water a few times. The reading for ammonia, according to our test strips, was normal. the pH was a little high, so we bought the pH decreaser.

I'm not really sure what we need to do now to make sure that our fish are ok. Our test strips are still reading normal, as well as, the ammonia is still reading normal, however from what we have read on the forum, it seems like we have an ammonia problem.

I will test the tank water and post the readings on my next posting this afternoon. Should we do a water change? It has only been 4-5 days and the fish have only been in the water a little over 48 hours.

Please help!!

Thank you!!

BTW: the temp is around 70 degrees... is this too low? If so do they make a SMALL heater for a 1.77 gal tank?
 
Furallicah
Member
Hello and Welcome to FishLore. Hmmm, sounds like ammonia sickness to me. Go and get you some prime and do a water change. Add two-three drops of prime and things should get better. As for the ph decresser I don't suggest using it. Chemicals that lower and raise the ph can also destroy the climate of your tank. Ph levels will lower over time. But the prime will detox the ammonia for abotu 24 hours then you do another water change and add the prime back into the tank. I have seen the glow fish starter kit before. If you have more then two fish in that tank I would upgrade to a 2 or 5 gallon tank. It will also be easier to keep at a warm tempature usually around 75-80 degrees because they are torpical fish. They also don't make heaters to my knowledge for anything lesser then a 2gal so it might be a good idea to increase size for the warmth. But you don't have to and if your budget is low then I can't really make the call for you. You can take them back if need be. But I do hope you can keep them they are pretty fish. I hope this little bit of info helps you. Best of Luck!
 
AquaSplash6201
Member
Welcome to Fishlore! I reccomend you do water changes everyday, take about 25% (Or more) out of your tank everyday. Just don't take too much water out or you'll ruin the nitrogen cycle.By removing water you are removing some of the ammonia. After each water change I would put a does of Prime in your tank, not only to remove the chlorine but to help remove the ammonia. When you test your tank, ammonia will show up but it will be a false indicator of ammonia. Prime is by far the best dechlorinator out there and it does so much more to your tank then dechlorinate. The false reading will only occur after you does your tank with prime and wait for a couple of hours. So in other words, just do water changes everyday and take out about 25% and add the right dosage of prime. Glofish are really pretty fish and I hope your fish make it through the cycle! Cycling is the hardest part of everyones fish keeping days. You basically have to stare at an empty tank for days and days and weeks and weeks and even maybe months. Its a patience game, just hang in there, it's a real reward when you get to put fish in there and watch them swim with a body full of health! Sorry for rambling, I kind of get off the subject sorry.

Okay I miss the fact that your tank was a 1 gallon tank, the same rules apply but maybe just take a cup and scoop one or two cups of water out and replace is with tap water and then put dechlorinator in there.
 
  • Thread Starter
xxSTEPHENSxx
Member
Thank you! Every bit of advice we can gather is helpful. We do have a 35 gal tank we are cleaning up today. We just don't have the pumps and gravel for it yet.

I have a couple of questions for you if you don't mind:

1. what chemicals should we have on hand at all times? Obviously the ph we don't need.
2. How do you recommend doing the water change? 40%?

Thank you so much for your time!

Thanks Aquasplash... I just read your post. I will do that to keep them alive until we upgrade tanks.
 
Furallicah
Member
For the water changes in the 1gal I would do 25-50% For the 35gal I would do 10-25% a day. It helps, then add the prime and boom happy fish lol. As for chemicals other then Prime I wouldnt really have anything else unless they get sick. So...Prime...and food. lol Best of Luck
 
haedra
Member
Oh dear.. I am sorry for your troubles.

I highly recommend a couple things: first, invest in a good liquid test kit. Many here use the API master kit (for freshwater). It is more accurate than the strips.

I also recommend you do nothing to adjust your pH, with chemicals at least. Most fish can adapt to a wide range of pH; however, swings in pH can kill them. Many times when we use a chemical to adjust the pH of our water, it does little more than end up causing a fluctuation later..which is much more harmful.

Glofish are genetically modified zebra danios, so their care requirements are the same. Here is a link with a bit of info: https://www.fishlore.com/Profiles-ZebraDanio.htm

While I have heard of people keeping a couple of these fish in a smaller tank, they really do much better in my opinion in a proper sized school..which would mean they would prefer to have a much larger tank than what you have.

For now, you are going to need to do regular water changes to keep your ammonia and nitrite down, with a product as was mentioned, like Prime. If you cannot find Prime, Amquel+ will work as well.

*edit beaten to the punch!
 
AquaSplash6201
Member
Jaime said:
Thank you! Every bit of advice we can gather is helpful. We do have a 35 gal tank we are cleaning up today. We just don't have the pumps and gravel for it yet.

I have a couple of questions for you if you don't mind:

1. what chemicals should we have on hand at all times? Obviously the ph we don't need.
2. How do you recommend doing the water change? 40%?

Thank you so much for your time!
Prime is a most definite Chemical that you'll need on hand at all times. And as for the Ph Chemical, I would just keep in case you need it. And I would also do that same thing as Furrllicah has stated with the water changes.
 
Furallicah
Member
Lol sorry Haedra
 
AquaSplash6201
Member
Jaime said:
Thanks Aquasplash... I just read your post. I will do that to keep them alive until we upgrade tanks.
You are very welcome!
 
harpua2002
Member
Furallicah said:
For the water changes in the 1gal I would do 25-50% For the 35gal I would do 10-25% a day. It helps, then add the prime and boom happy fish lol. As for chemicals other then Prime I wouldnt really have anything else unless they get sick. So...Prime...and food. lol Best of Luck
Why? Just let the test kit tell you how much water to change. IMO it's a good idea to keep levels of ammonia and nitrite at .25 or less. This won't make the cycle last longer (that's another one of those myths that's still perpetuated for some reason). If ammonia or nitrite hit .5, a 50% water change will bring the level down to .25. In many cases, it may be necessary to change water more than once per day.

The biggest issue I see here is that glofish are not suitable for a 1.5 gallon tank. I wish these kits weren't available or at least not marketed toward glofish keepers. My suggestion would be to return the glofish you have and the 1.5 gallon tank if possible. Even a betta isn't well suited to a tank that size long term IMO. Then, focus on gathering the equipment you need for your 35 gallon and cycle it without the use of fish. You'll rarely get any good advice from Petco, or any other chain store for that matter, so it's really important to research before purchasing. Most of us here, myself included, started pretty much the same way that you are now, so don't feel bad about it.
 
Furallicah
Member
AquaSplash6201 said:
Prime is a most definite Chemical that you'll need on hand at all times. And as for the Ph Chemical, I would just keep in case you need it. And I would also do that same thing as Furrllicah has stated with the water changes.
Sorry AquaSplash I have to respectfully disagree with you. Ph decrease and increase can completly destroy an aquariums climate. Which is why most people on here do not suggest it and like Haedra said fish can adapt to the specific ph of a person aquarium as long as its not out the room. Keeping with the water changes will lower then ph and even with out doing water changes the ph will naturally lower itself.
 
Prince Powder
Member
Welcome to Fishlore! I'm sorry your fish are sick. Unfortunately many of the pre-assembled kits they sell for this fish or that fish are generally far too small for the fish they are supposedly designed for and usually lack one primary piece of equipment, a heater. It sounds like your fish are suffering the affects of the ammonia in your tank, they are possibly having issues with pH fluctuations as well. The first thing is you should most definitely change about 50% of the water.

Be wary of what results your test strips give, they are highly inaccurate more often than not. Plus they tend to give you a "safe" or "normal" range for ammonia and the only safe or normal amount of ammonia is to have none. Liquid tests like this are far definitely the way to go as they will be accurate and in the long run cost much less then strips since these bottles will provide you with hundreds of tests. I am glad you found the page on the nitrogen cycle. It is an extremely important part of fish keeping. Since you already have your fish you will have to do a fish-in cycle. Cycling with fish is very hard on the fish, but with proper daily maintenance they should make it through to the end. Glofish are pretty hardy little fish.

When cycling with fish you will want to invest in a better water conditioner. Top Fin products are good to use in already established tanks, but when cycling you will need a water conditioner that will detoxify the ammonia and nitrites in the water as well as remove the chlorine. is an excellent product to use when cycling. It will condition the water and detox ammonia and nitrites for 24 hours but will still leave the ammonia available for the beneficial bacteria to feed on and grow. Because it only detoxes for 24 hours you will need to do daily water changes using the Prime at every water change. The water changes will help keep your levels low and the Prime will keep anything left over detoxified until your next water change.

I would also stop using the pH decreaser. If possible, return it and get your money back. Petsmart is usually pretty good about returns so you shouldn't have an issue. It is never a good idea to fiddle with the pH. Most fish will adapt well to a different pH than what is recommended for them. When you use chemicals to alter the pH it becomes unstable which can lead to extreme pH swings. It is those pH swings which can shock fish and possibly kill them so as I said, it is better left alone.

As for the temperature, glofish are tropical fish and really do need warmer temperatures than 70. Ideally, they should be between 77-80 degrees. The problem with raising the temps is your tank size. They do make small heaters, but I think even the smaller heaters would overheat the water in a tank that small. The size of your tank is an issue as well. Glofish are generally VERY active swimmers. Even though they are small, they actually need much larger spaces so they can swim properly. They also are schooling fish and should be kept in groups of 6 or more, which is more than your tank can handle. Quite frankly a 1.77 gallon tank isn't really a proper sized home for any fish. Glofish really should be in at least a 10 gallon tank. A 10 gallon would allow them the room they need to swim and also allow you the space to keep a proper sized school.
 
  • Thread Starter
xxSTEPHENSxx
Member
Ok you guys are awesome! I can't wait until I can contribute knowledge to newbies.

Ok this is the plan we just discussed. Please tell me if we should proceed:

Going to pick up a 10gal tank that comes with everything we need from Walmart. I think it's like $40. Grab a liquid test kit. Pick up some Prime.

In the mean time I will do a 50% water change and add prime to keep them alive. I will start the nitrogen cycle. HOPEFULLY it won't take too long to complete. I will continue to do a 50% water change until the tank is ready.

QUESTION: Should I add water conditioner and heat the water before I add it to my tank while doing the water change?

You guys are life savers... Literally! My little glofish appreciate it.
 
Furallicah
Member
Ohhhh I got one of those 5gal starter tanks they are amazing and I know the 10gal are just the same set up. I think you could do 25% changes. With the prime things will be much better for your glofish. And no you don't have to heat the water. The tank will stay at what ever tempature your house is. Also if the 10gal doesn't have it I would pick up a heater for it too.
 
harpua2002
Member
According to fishbase, danio rerio live in a wide range of temperatures, from about 65-75F. They should be fine without a heater.


How many danios do you have now? It really would be easiest to return them and complete a fishless cycle in either a 10 gallon kit tank or the 35 you already have. If you are set on cycling with fish, please do not add any more fish until you are sure the tank has cycled.
 
Furallicah
Member
Oh well never mind the heater
 
Prince Powder
Member
The walmart 10 gallon kits will be great for your GloFish! They sell heaters there as well, but I believe most of the heaters they sell in the stores are preset heaters and are not adjustable. (At least that's all they carry at my local Walmart) Adjustable heaters are better, so if possible, try and find an adjustable, fully submersible water heater. I wouldn't heat the water before adding it to your smaller tank, temperature fluctuations will stress your fish. As with all things fish related, stability is the most important thing. Once you have the fish in the 10 gallon tank with a heater, you will want to warm the water to match the temp of the tank, but for now, just make sure it is room temperature when you add the water.

Just a word of warning, cycling a tank is a true excersize in patience, It usually takes about a month.
 
  • Thread Starter
xxSTEPHENSxx
Member
It would be cheaper to buy the 10gal tank that comes with everything for now. I don't have any place to put the 35gal.

I don't want to return my fish... I have already named them and I am attached. I want to save them.

So I should or shouldn't buy a heater?

Prince Powder said:
The walmart 10 gallon kits will be great for your GloFish! They sell heaters there as well, but I believe most of the heaters they sell in the stores are preset heaters and are not adjustable. (At least that's all they carry at my local Walmart) Adjustable heaters are better, so if possible, try and find an adjustable, fully submersible water heater. I wouldn't heat the water before adding it to your smaller tank, temperature fluctuations will stress your fish. As with all things fish related, stability is the most important thing. Once you have the fish in the 10 gallon tank with a heater, you will want to warm the water to match the temp of the tank, but for now, just make sure it is room temperature when you add the water.

Just a word of warning, cycling a tank is a true excersize in patience, It usually takes about a month.

If I am really careful and make this top priority do you think my fish can survive through the cycle process? Glofish are pretty "hardy" aren't they?
 
Prince Powder
Member
If you are vigilant about your daily water changes and use a proper water conditioner like the Prime that was mentioned, I think your fish will make it through. Cycling is hard on ANY fish, but some fish tend to be more sensitive and some have a wider range. GloFish are pretty hardy, so long as they were healthy to begin with, I think they will be fine.
 
  • Thread Starter
xxSTEPHENSxx
Member
This is what I am about to do... correct me if I am wrong.

1. Let fresh water sit until room temp (70)
2. Dip out 50% of the water from the tank.
3. Add water to the tank and add Prime water conditioner?

Should this be my daily routine until my 10gal tank is cycled?
 
potatos
Member
Get used media from a friend or the pet store, ie. gravel, decorations, plants, used filters. they will be full of the correct bacteria and will help you quickly establish your tank. beware that other harmful things can come with them, so be sure to get it from a healthy tank.

I have glofish and love them, and they are not sterile, as rumors suggest. they are prolific breeders without anything special besides some java moss (easiest plant ever) and good water conditions. I find babes in every water change bucket (they are extreamly small)

when you do water changes, be sure to treat the tap water with amquel+ or prime before putting the water in the tank, as the chlorine will damage your benefical bacteria colonies and offset your cycling process.
 
harpua2002
Member
As haedra mentioned, it is important to pick up a test kit with liquid reagents. Test strips are inaccurate and won't give you much idea of what is really going on in your tank.

harpua2002 said:
Just let the test kit tell you how much water to change. IMO it's a good idea to keep levels of ammonia and nitrite at .25 or less. This won't make the cycle last longer (that's another one of those myths that's still perpetuated for some reason). If ammonia or nitrite hit .5, a 50% water change will bring the level down to .25. In many cases, it may be necessary to change water more than once per day.
 
  • Thread Starter
xxSTEPHENSxx
Member
Ok... I changed the water and they seem to be doing a little better now. They are no longer at the top of the water. I will keep you guys updated. Thanks.

*UPDATE*

Got the 10gal tank up and going. I am begining the cycle now. I will be purchasing a test kit tomorrow.
 
harpua2002
Member
Due to the increased water volume in the 10 gallon vs. the 1.5 gallon, I'd suggest moving the glofish to the 10 gallon for cycling. IMO it's going to be next to impossible to cycle a tank that small with fish in it, but a 10 gallon is doable. I'd move them tomorrow once the temp is stable in the 10. In a couple days, there's hardly been any progress on the cycle in the small tank so you're not really losing any ground.
 
Prince Powder
Member
I agree with harpua2002. Since the smaller tank is not cycled and the fish will have to go through the cycling process either way, they may as well be in a tank that is big enough for them to swim in. If possible, return the GloFish kit, even if you have to say it was damaged somehow. IMO a 1.77 gallon tank isn't really big enough for anything. You can use the money from your refund to get the other stuff you will need like the liquid test kit and the Prime. Best of luck on your cycle!
 
  • Thread Starter
xxSTEPHENSxx
Member
harpua2002 said:
Due to the increased water volume in the 10 gallon vs. the 1.5 gallon, I'd suggest moving the glofish to the 10 gallon for cycling. IMO it's going to be next to impossible to cycle a tank that small with fish in it, but a 10 gallon is doable. I'd move them tomorrow once the temp is stable in the 10. In a couple days, there's hardly been any progress on the cycle in the small tank so you're not really losing any ground.
Ok that sounds good. I bought a heater so it should be stable soon. I really do appreciate all the help you guys have given.

The glofish will help the cycling process but that means I can't add 100% ammonia or the tetra saft start right?

Should I just use the glofish and the fish food to do the cycle?
 
harpua2002
Member
You can add Tetra Safe Start along with the danios and it has a pretty good chance of working. You cannot use it with Prime or Amquel apparently. This is probably your best option IMO if you are too attached to the fish to return them.

There is no need to add either ammonia or extra fish food to cycle the tank. 3 glofish in a 10 gallon tank will produce plenty of ammonia on their own.
 
  • Thread Starter
xxSTEPHENSxx
Member
Ok so the fish will do the cycling for me?
 
Prince Powder
Member
If you were able to find Tetra SafeStart (not to be confused with Tetra AquaSafe as they are two VERY different products) then you add the fish with the TSS. If you have it, then here's a step by step.

Set up and fill your 10 gallon tank. If you used Prime, Amquel+ or API Ammo Lock you will have to let it run 24-48 hours before doing anything. If you used a different water conditioner that does not lock up or detox ammonia then you are good to start as soon as your water temperatures are stable.

Once you are set and stable, pour in the Tetra SafeStart (TSS). You have to pour in the ENTIRE bottle! That is very important! Pour your fish and some of their tank water into a plastic bag (a large Ziploc bag would work, or if you still have it and it's in good shape you can use the bag they came in) and float the bag in the 10 gallon tank. Leave the bag there for about 15-20 minutes then add a small scoop of water from your 10 gallon tank into the bag. Add a small amount of water to the bag every 15 minutes until the bag is almost full. Once the bag is full, use a net to scoop out your fish and put them into the 10 gallon tank. You can just throw out the water in the bag, do not pour it into the tank.

Now you have the TSS and the fish in the tank and everything is up and running. Now it's time for patience! It is not recommended that you test your water during the first 7 days because your tests will not be accurate. You also don't do any water changes during this time when you are using TSS. This is also very important as water changes will cause the TSS to fail. Just sit back and let it work. Basically the only thing you do during the first 7 days is feed your fish. On day 7, test your water. Your test results should be ammonia 0, nitrites 0, and nitrates anything more than 0. If your test shows that you still have ammonia or nitrites, do nothing except wait another 3 days then test your water again and your tank should be cycled. If on the 10th day after adding TSS you are still showing ammonia or nitrites then the TSS didn't work. If the TSS doesn't work then you will have to cycle using the daily water change method with Prime or Amquel+.

I have cycled 2 tanks using TSS and I was fortunate to have it work for me both times. There have been cases, however, where people here on the forum have tried TSS and it didn't work, but it is an option and IMO worth a shot.
 
  • Thread Starter
xxSTEPHENSxx
Member
Prince Powder said:
If you were able to find Tetra SafeStart (not to be confused with Tetra AquaSafe as they are two VERY different products) then you add the fish with the TSS. If you have it, then here's a step by step.

Set up and fill your 10 gallon tank. If you used Prime, Amquel+ or API Ammo Lock you will have to let it run 24-48 hours before doing anything. If you used a different water conditioner that does not lock up or detox ammonia then you are good to start as soon as your water temperatures are stable.

Once you are set and stable, pour in the Tetra SafeStart (TSS). You have to pour in the ENTIRE bottle! That is very important! Pour your fish and some of their tank water into a plastic bag (a large Ziploc bag would work, or if you still have it and it's in good shape you can use the bag they came in) and float the bag in the 10 gallon tank. Leave the bag there for about 15-20 minutes then add a small scoop of water from your 10 gallon tank into the bag. Add a small amount of water to the bag every 15 minutes until the bag is almost full. Once the bag is full, use a net to scoop out your fish and put them into the 10 gallon tank. You can just throw out the water in the bag, do not pour it into the tank.

Now you have the TSS and the fish in the tank and everything is up and running. Now it's time for patience! It is not recommended that you test your water during the first 7 days because your tests will not be accurate. You also don't do any water changes during this time when you are using TSS. This is also very important as water changes will cause the TSS to fail. Just sit back and let it work. Basically the only thing you do during the first 7 days is feed your fish. On day 7, test your water. Your test results should be ammonia 0, nitrites 0, and nitrates anything more than 0. If your test shows that you still have ammonia or nitrites, do nothing except wait another 3 days then test your water again and your tank should be cycled. If on the 10th day after adding TSS you are still showing ammonia or nitrites then the TSS didn't work. If the TSS doesn't work then you will have to cycle using the daily water change method with Prime or Amquel+.

I have cycled 2 tanks using TSS and I was fortunate to have it work for me both times. There have been cases, however, where people here on the forum have tried TSS and it didn't work, but it is an option and IMO worth a shot.
I will give the TSS a shot and see if it works. Thanks for the walkthrough. If the TSS doesn't work would you mind walking me through the daily water change method? I just don't trust myself. I like for someone to tell me. I hate guessing especially when lives are at stake.

Thanks Prince!

These are the lives at stake!
 
callichma
Member
Welcome to fishlore! I love glofish and will probably get some when I have a tank that has compatible fish.
Here's a suggestion: If you are going to get a 10g, you can set it up and use Tetra Safe Start which contains beneficial bacteria for an almost instant cycle. You add your fish at the same time as you add the TSS. TSS is hard to find in fish stores. They will try to sell you something else and say it it comparable, but these other "comparable" products contain the wrong kind of bacteria and cannot reproduce in your tank. Your best bet is to order TSS online. You have to follow the directions carefully for it to work. Here is a link that provides more help in successfully using TSS:

Just noticed there are several previous posts about TSS. That's what I get for trying to watch the Olympics and type at the same time. Anyway, great minds think alike. Hope you can find the TSS. I have had good luck finding it at non-chain fish stores.
 
  • Thread Starter
xxSTEPHENSxx
Member
Really like the blue lighting!
 
potatos
Member
Oh it looks like your red one will be a mom soon! I still reccomend some java moss, as it is one of the few plants that will grow under the inadiquate light that comes withmost starter kits. but if you don't want babies, then nevermind lol
 
Prince Powder
Member
Beautiful job setting up the tank! I agree, you might not get a chance to buy any more fish when you're done cycling, you might end up with so many you'll have to give them away! Your red one does look a bit tubby!

I wish you the best of luck with the TSS! I'm amazed you were able to find some, the only store near me that carried it recently went out of business. If for whatever reason the TSS fails just let us know, we will be glad to help you through the cycle.
 
  • Thread Starter
xxSTEPHENSxx
Member
potatos said:
Oh it looks like your red one will be a mom soon! I still reccomend some java moss, as it is one of the few plants that will grow under the inadiquate light that comes withmost starter kits. but if you don't want babies, then nevermind lol
I know! I should have just bought her and saved $10 haha. I will get some java moss. I assume that pets mart or pet supplies carries it?

Prince Powder said:
Beautiful job setting up the tank! I agree, you might not get a chance to buy any more fish when you're done cycling, you might end up with so many you'll have to give them away! Your red one does look a bit tubby!

I wish you the best of luck with the TSS! I'm amazed you were able to find some, the only store near me that carried it recently went out of business. If for whatever reason the TSS fails just let us know, we will be glad to help you through the cycle.
Thank you! I already want a bigger tank!!! I really enjoyed picking out the decor! I wasn't able to find any TSS yet. I have one more place to go see if they have it. I will do that tomorrow. If they don't carry it then I may be doing this the normal way. I really do appreciate the help. This is a very tight family I can tell already.
 
Prince Powder
Member
To be honest I've only been on this board for a few months but the people here have a way of making you feel right at home right from the start! Wanting a bigger tank is a common condition around here, it even has a name! Multiple Tank Syndrome or MTS! Search any of these boards and you will find tons of mentions of it. We are all enablers who will do nothing to deter you from getting more and more tanks! In fact, we make it a point to try to talk everyone into getting yet another tank no matter how many they already have! Bigger tanks are actually easier than smaller tanks since the larger volumes of water helps to keep things stable more naturally. Plus it opens you up to far more stocking possibilities.

TSS can be hard to find, people tend to have better luck at mom and pop fish stores than in chain places. Even with all the smaller fish stores in my area I was only able to find it in one place. Sadly, that store is no longer in business. It is readily available online though. At the top of the page you'll see links for various online stores, all of them carry I believe. I know Drs. Foster and Smith as well as BigAlsOnline carry it so if you can't find it in the stores, that is an option as well.
 
  • Thread Starter
xxSTEPHENSxx
Member
Well this should be a fun journey then. I had a fish tank when I was a kid and have been wanting to get back into it. I have a 35 gal tank in the garage. I need a light for it and a filter system. I am going to fill it with water some time this week to make sure it holds good. If it does I will be slowly building that one in the coming months. Got to pay the government first...

I may just order it offline if I can't find it tomorrow.

I tested today and I had this:

Ammonia - .25
Nitrite - 0.00
Nitrate - 0.00

Is this a good start for a tank that is 30 hours old?
 
Prince Powder
Member
That is a great way to start! Remember your daily water changes, try and keep the ammonia in the tank at about that level for now. You more than likely won't see anything other than the ammonia for a while, but as long as you do your water changes and keep the ammonia detoxed with your water conditioner your fish will be safe. Once you start getting nitrites, the bacteria that eats your ammonia is growing and will help keep the ammonia in check along with your water changes.
 
  • Thread Starter
xxSTEPHENSxx
Member
Ok so should I test every day or just do a water change anyway?
 
harpua2002
Member
This is JMO, but I think you should test every day. A lot of times I see recommendations for a daily 25% water change, but sometimes I think more is needed. I'd like to see the ammonia level stay at .25 or less, so I'd test and see what the level is in the tank before deciding how much water to change. Same for nitrite once you start seeing that. For example, if you test and see a reading of .5, a 50% water change will bring you down to .25. This does not impact cycling time IME, but others may disagree. Since ammonia and nitrite are toxic to fish and can cause permanent damage to them, I feel it's best to keep levels as low as you can. Congrats on the new 10 gal kit and kudos for the tank upgrade- your danios will be much happier as a result.
 
  • Thread Starter
xxSTEPHENSxx
Member
harpua2002 said:
This is JMO, but I think you should test every day. A lot of times I see recommendations for a daily 25% water change, but sometimes I think more is needed. I'd like to see the ammonia level stay at .25 or less, so I'd test and see what the level is in the tank before deciding how much water to change. Same for nitrite once you start seeing that. For example, if you test and see a reading of .5, a 50% water change will bring you down to .25. This does not impact cycling time IME, but others may disagree. Since ammonia and nitrite are toxic to fish and can cause permanent damage to them, I feel it's best to keep levels as low as you can. Congrats on the new 10 gal kit and kudos for the tank upgrade- your danios will be much happier as a result.
Thanks! They are much much much more happier. I will test tonight and post my readings and see where I stand! Thanks.
 
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xxSTEPHENSxx
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results were the same as yesterday .25 ammonia
 
Prince Powder
Member
I agree that you should test daily while you're cycling, once the cycling is complete then you can go to a more laxed schedule like once a week. Don't worry, your API kit will last through the cycle and then some!

Just remember to test right before you change the water as opposed to right after. When you are using Prime and an API ammonia test kit it will test positive for both toxic ammonia as well as non toxic ammonium. So the only way to get accurate readings on ammonia with an API test kit is to test 24 hours after you last added the Prime.
 
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xxSTEPHENSxx
Member
Prince Powder said:
I agree that you should test daily while you're cycling, once the cycling is complete then you can go to a more laxed schedule like once a week. Don't worry, your API kit will last through the cycle and then some!

Just remember to test right before you change the water as opposed to right after. When you are using Prime and an API ammonia test kit it will test positive for both toxic ammonia as well as non toxic ammonium. So the only way to get accurate readings on ammonia with an API test kit is to test 24 hours after you last added the Prime.
Ok, I will continue to test daily. The fish seem extremely happy now that they have more room. They are zooming from one side to the other. The only thing that worries me is that they are chasing each other around a lot.

I read that they will be more aggressive when they don't have the proper size school like 6 fish. I only have 3. I don't want to add anymore why I am doing the cycling but they are very aggressive towards one another. No nipped fins that I can tell so far.
 

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