Giving Up.

remy113

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Hey guys so I’m fed up with my tank. I got a 30 gallon tank for free from a friend with a stand. So I bought a marine land filter and a heater to keep it at a temp and a bubbler and a led light And gravel and a gravel siphon. I also bought test strips with hoping I wouldn’t have to drop the money on a better tank. So we started the tank using safe start and we lost our first few fish in a few days of getting them. So I did a complete restart. And used safe start again. This time we put 2 goldfish and 2 plecos... yes I have been informed they get huge. Well we where able to keep the gold fish alive for about month and half even thru a bad algae bloom. So I got into the habit of weekly water changes and cleaning the rocks. Well everything was going good till yesterday. Woke up and both goldfish where dead but plecos are fine. Stumped me I checked my water levels and they where all fine besides hard water. Well I kinda have given up. I pulled the dead fish did my normal water change routine. I went to the store and got some cheaper fish that only grow to 2inches or 3. I stocked the tank with those 6 of them. I’m at the point if they die Im emptying the tank of everything and putting it in storage. I’ve never know people to have so many problem with tanks. We only add one water treatment and that is for calorine cause we have town water. And usually that window is closedand we don’t usually have the light in during the day. I don’t know guys I’m fed up any advice?
 

jaymethy

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Goldfish are cold water fish, they need water in the 60F range, whereas your heater is probably set for higher than that (which is what plecos need), so I imagine that is part of the issue you are having with just the goldfish dying.

In addition to that, goldfish and plecos have a massive bioload, both being too big for a 30 gallon. And adding them, with that much bioload at once to an uncycled tank is probably the culprit for some of their deaths as well.

I'd suggest you return both plecos, or find them new homes as soon as possible. What species are the new smaller fish?
I'd suggest you run another cycle with TSS with just those 6 fish, just to make sure you are cycled properly, and then think about additional stocking (which I'd be happy to help you out with).

Starting out fishkeeping can be super frustrating, but stick with it, with some help it can be super rewarding!
 

2211Nighthawk

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Unless your cooking your fish, I doubt warm water had anything to do with the goldies death. A dozen other things could have caused it, anywhere from already sick fish to stress.
 

jaymethy

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2211Nighthawk said:
Unless your cooking your fish, I doubt warm water had anything to do with the goldies death. A dozen other things could have caused it, anywhere from already sick fish to stress.
I believe that there was an additional cause, but perhaps the reason it effected the goldies and not the plecos is water temperature. Keeping fish at the wrong temperature isn't going to kill them itself, but definitely makes the more susceptible to changes in water parameters, stress, disease, pathogens, etc.
 

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I don’t think you should give up. A lot of people here, myself included have had problems before and one of the main reasons this site exists.

I might know what happened here. Sometimes doing a through cleaning can be detrimental. You stated that you just started to do weekly water changes.

With the fish you had in there the gold fish might have been used to the bad environment. When you cleaned the whole gravel I’m betting that the didn’t get used to the clean water. Again this is a theory. But it has happened to me.

Ideally it might have been best to clean maybe half the gravel instead of the whole tamale.

We also can’t throw out the theory of if the fish were sick. We’re they happy and doing well before the change or sluggish and unresponsive prior?

Don’t give up. We’ve all been there before. Some stories are similar to yours and others beginners had tanks that had babies galore! You will find your happy place in this hobby. You just need to find the right tools, fish and ask questions.
 

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This hobby makes us all want to give up at one point or another, I think.

Whether it's a fish dying for no apparent reason, a fish jumping, us accidentally killing a fish, or even killing an entire tank, it happens to all of us. I once dropped a light fixture into my 10 gallon reef tank, and killed about $1000 of livestock. I sold everything I had except for my betta at that point. I pretty immediately wished I hadn't.

You know your tank was badly stocked, but it happens. More than likely, your goldfish came in diseased, as they're often raised too quickly and kept in horrible conditions. It's very possible that they had some sort of organ failure or parasite that took them down in the end.

What're the new fish you got? As mentioned above, I'd recommend taking the plecos to a store and dropping them off, and starting your tank from scratch with your 6 new fish. We can help you from there!
 

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What are your actual water readings? You're using test strips. Do they test for ammonia? Some test strips are really unreliable, depending on the brand. The most reliable testing equipment is the API Master Test Kit.

It might be helpful to take a water sample to your LFS to make sure your readings match.

To be honest, lots of people who are just starting out say things like, "The water's just fine," then they move on. It's kind of like blowing off what is the most likely cause of the trouble. Maybe your water is just fine, but it's impossible to tell without getting your actual readings. It would be like saying, "I can't understand why I slid off the road around that curve. My speed was just fine." Nobody could give an educated guess why you ended up in the ditch without knowing what your speed actually was.

I think just about everybody who has stuck with fishkeeping for any length of time has been at a point where they wonder if it's all worth it. I know I've been at points where I was ready to tear down my fish room. If it's nothing but aggravation, that's one thing. But if it's a matter of being frustrated because you really want to be successful at it, I'd recommend sticking with it and learning as much as you can. Hiccups are part of the game.
 

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I hope you have success with the 6 new inhabitants and don’t give up.

I strongly encourage you to get an API MASTER TEST KIT and test your water regularly.

Weekly water changes are necessary for fish health.

This hobby is time consuming but there are ways to streamline the processes and the folks on fishlore will gladly address any and all questions. Sometimes it’s better to ask what fish to get before you buy them, then asking how to fix a problem after you get your fish.

This hobby is also very rewarding. My day usually starts with a cup of coffee, watching my tanks for 1/2 hour as the lights pop on. Relaxing and rewarding
 

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My two cents. I’ve had goldfish for ages. They can take a LOT. But, if their water parameters are changed too much at one time they, like most fish, are susceptible to shock. Just from listening to your original post, it doesn’t sound like your tank cycled. Read about the nitrogen cycle even if you think you know it. Sometimes we forget.
You don’t say what kind of plecos. The common pleco can take cooler water. It can take most anything. Even the slime coat off an angelfish but that’s a whole other story.

Please, don’t give up. Like the others have said, we’ve all been there and guess what, we’ll probably all be there again. Stuff happens. We need caring people in the fishkeeping game. So, please keep trying. Ask questions. Tell stories. We’re here waiting. Promise.
 
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remy113

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Hunter1 said:
I hope you have success with the 6 new inhabitants and don’t give up.

I strongly encourage you to get an API MASTER TEST KIT and test your water regularly.

Weekly water changes are necessary for fish health.

This hobby is time consuming but there are ways to streamline the processes and the folks on fishlore will gladly address any and all questions. Sometimes it’s better to ask what fish to get before you buy them, then asking how to fix a problem after you get your fish.

This hobby is also very rewarding. My day usually starts with a cup of coffee, watching my tanks for 1/2 hour as the lights pop on. Relaxing and rewarding
I have been doing my weekly water changes since the first round of fish died. So the recent set of gold fish I had for 6weeks before they died which means 6 partial water changes 5 gallon changes which would be a little over 15% water changes. I guess I’ll have to save up and buy the master kit( right budget I’m the only income for my family so I don’t get much hobby money). What’s getting me fed up and wanting to call it quits is I know people that have never had these issues. And constantly hearing about that annoyes me. The test strips I have I was testing regularly and my levels where coming back ideal or safe beside my hard water. I don’t know how to treat my hard water. Also what makes me want to give up is I’ll just get the algae under control with after changes and making sure not having sunlight hitting the tank and other people will open the shades near my tank allow it to have a algae bloom.
 

Gypsy13

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Yes. It can be very frustrating. The first guppies I bought were in 2016. Bought them sick and I knew it. What a bloody challenge! I too have little money. I’m blind (helps to no end). Frequently hurting myself (in a hip brace right now). Then having to learn about guppy problems the hard way. Learning about meds. Not having the money for meds. Believe me, I know. We ALL know. But, if you enjoy the hobby, please stick with it. And don’t let “everyone” tell you they’ve never had problems like algae blooms ot fish dying for no reason. We have been there. That’s why Fishlore is so wonderful! You get to learn from everybody. Then, if you’re lucky, one day you may even be able to help someone else. It’s worth it.
 

pugletfan

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Awwww there are definitely things that can go wrong!! Most of us have been there!! The good news is Fishlore is such a great place to get help! There are so many knowledgeable and helpful people here! Your tank is such a nice sized tank .
 
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remy113

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Lorekeeper said:
This hobby makes us all want to give up at one point or another, I think.

Whether it's a fish dying for no apparent reason, a fish jumping, us accidentally killing a fish, or even killing an entire tank, it happens to all of us. I once dropped a light fixture into my 10 gallon reef tank, and killed about $1000 of livestock. I sold everything I had except for my betta at that point. I pretty immediately wished I hadn't.

You know your tank was badly stocked, but it happens. More than likely, your goldfish came in diseased, as they're often raised too quickly and kept in horrible conditions. It's very possible that they had some sort of organ failure or parasite that took them down in the end.

What're the new fish you got? As mentioned above, I'd recommend taking the plecos to a store and dropping them off, and starting your tank from scratch with your 6 new fish. We can help you from there!
The fish I got I think are normally know as feeder goldfish. And I pretty much did start from scratch with water. I didn’t change the filters thou because they looked good and where seeming to work. I marked down when I bough these fish and I’m gonna try to cycle the tank over the next couple months doing 5 gallon changes weekly with my rock vac. I hope that helps. I’m not gonna touch anything in the tank other wise and feed the every other day to help control amonia levels
 

Lorekeeper

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Alright man, not to beat you while you're down, but usually, feeder goldfish are common goldfish. Common Goldfish can get well over a foot long, so much too big for a 29 gallon tank.

Is it possible for you to take the goldfish back, and for us to suggest some stocking for you in the meantime?
 
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remy113

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Lorekeeper said:
Alright man, not to beat you while you're down, but usually, feeder goldfish are common goldfish. Common Goldfish can get well over a foot long, so much too big for a 29 gallon tank.

Is it possible for you to take the goldfish back, and for us to suggest some stocking for you in the meantime?
I was told they would only grow to 2 inchs if they even survived that long. What are you suggesting for fish keep in mind I don’t have a actual pet store any where within 100 miles and I’m not kidding on that.
 

Lorekeeper

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Wherever you got them is severely misinformed, then.

For a 29, you could start with a basic community tank. Little aggression, and should be easy to keep going. I'd go with something like this:

5-6 Male Guppies, or 3 Male Mollies
6 Albino Corydoras
1 Dwarf Gourami

You'll be able to stock much more than that down the road, but it's a good place to start. I'd personally recommend that you get a group of fish per week, and no more, to allow your cycle to adjust to your new fish. So, maybe get the guppies/mollies one week, the corydoras the next, and then the dwarf gourami the next. If it goes well from there, we can start talking about adding stock.

Notice that I said male guppies and mollies. These guys breed like crazy, and you won't want that going on in your tank if you're having trouble getting one started. Definitely go for all males!
 
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remy113

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Lorekeeper said:
Wherever you got them is severely misinformed, then.

For a 29, you could start with a basic community tank. Little aggression, and should be easy to keep going. I'd go with something like this:

5-6 Male Guppies, or 3 Male Mollies
6 Albino Corydoras
1 Dwarf Gourami

You'll be able to stock much more than that down the road, but it's a good place to start. I'd personally recommend that you get a group of fish per week, and no more, to allow your cycle to adjust to your new fish. So, maybe get the guppies/mollies one week, the corydoras the next, and then the dwarf gourami the next. If it goes well from there, we can start talking about adding stock.

Notice that I said male guppies and mollies. These guys breed like crazy, and you won't want that going on in your tank if you're having trouble getting one started. Definitely go for all males!
Well when these fish die I’ll look into ordering some online somewhere. And I mislabeled the post it’s a 30 gallon tank not much bigger but just figured id correct my mistake
 

Gypsy13

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remy113 said:
Well when these fish die I’ll look into ordering some online somewhere. And I mislabeled the post it’s a 30 gallon tank not much bigger but just figured id correct my mistake
Why would you wait for these fish to die? Can’t you take them back? Like Lorekeeper said, you could start with male guppies. Beautiful hardy fish. With them, you’re getting fish that will always fit your tank. You learn what it will take to provide them the care they need to stay alive. You learn all about water treatment and testing. It’s a win win for everyone. No fish need to die right?
 
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remy113

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Gypsy13 said:
Why would you wait for these fish to die? Can’t you take them back? Like Lorekeeper said, you could start with male guppies. Beautiful hardy fish. With them, you’re getting fish that will always fit your tank. You learn what it will take to provide them the care they need to stay alive. You learn all about water treatment and testing. It’s a win win for everyone. No fish need to die right?
Because I don’t think either of the places around me the sells fish will take them back
 

Rtessy

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remy113 said:
Because I don’t think either of the places around me the sells fish will take them back
Most places will, if it's something like PetSmart or Petco they'll take them back for up to a month. Go ahead and ask, the worst that can happen is that they say no, which you're already expecting.
 
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