Giving cats fresh meats?

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konstargirl

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Okay. My older sister gives her cats fresh meats everyday and she weened them off commercial cat food couple of months ago. I was wondering if giving cats fresh raw meat safe?

Thanks.
 

gremlin

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It is safe as long as the meat used is not contaminated. There are a lot of people that advocate raw food diets for dogs and cats. You can google "raw food diet for cats" and find all sorts of information. Several of the web sites say that cats (and dogs) would hunt for live food in the wild, so we should provide raw meat for them. Just bear in mind that in the wild, the predator will consume not only the meat, but the skin, bones, organs, and stomach contents as well. That is why a well formulated commercial food is perfectly fine for those who do not have the time or money to spend on a raw food diet. Also, feeding only raw meat does not necessarily provide all the nutrition the cat (or dog) would need since it does not duplicate exactly what the animal would eat in the wild. A raw food diet should include more than just the raw meat and really should be planned with the help of a veterinarian to make sure that all the animal's needs are provided for.
 

Treefork

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Depends what kind of meat too. In the wild the meat is killed and eaten fresh, here it has time to form bacterias and such. Raw chicken, raw hamburger, probably not a good idea in my opinion.
 

sirdarksol

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Yes, it is generally very safe.
Most animals' digestive systems are made to handle all but the worst bacteria out there, and cats are no different. Humans can't handle these because our systems have become accustomed to the most dangerous types of food being cooked or otherwise treated to kill of bacteria.
I would, however, be leery of feeding any raw ground meat, unless it comes from a very reputable source. The stuff that most of the big companies put into the ground meat is pretty scary. I love a medium rare steak, but I cook my burgers to well done because of this.
I would also suggest buying from a local, natural or organic seller, rather than the grocery store. The small places are checked more frequently than Tyson (the source of almost all of the grocery-store chicken) or the other big corps, because these places kind of has the FDA in its pocket. Because of this, the little places usually hold themselves to much higher standards of cleanliness and safety than the factory butchers. They simply can't afford to pay any fines.
 
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konstargirl

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Oh okay I just want to make sure.

The reason she just give them a raw meat diet because she feels that the stuff that they put in cat foods is that they don't really eat that stuff in the wild like carrots and other veggies and they aren't omnivorous. ><
 

gremlin

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They may not go graze veggies like cows or rabbits would, but they do eat them from the stomach of their prey. Because they are in the wild, they have to find the highest source of calories from the easiest source of food. Meat has more calories than vegetables and so is a more valuable food source. That is why, in the wild, cats (lions, cheetahs, jaguars, tigers, and such) are primarily meat eaters. They have to conserve their energy and cannot afford to "waste" it on eating fresh veggies and fruits.
 

Treefork

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Not to mention cats have been domesticated for about 3000 years so your basic housecat is about as wild as .... a dairy cow.
 

sirdarksol

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Treefork said:
Not to mention cats have been domesticated for about 3000 years so your basic housecat is about as wild as .... a dairy cow.
I'd call it "quasi-domesticated." Even in my parents' generation, cats were not indoor creatures. They may have been indoor/outdoor, but they definitely spent most of their time outdoors, and got much of their food from catching wild critters.
In most cultures for the past few millenia, man tolerated/encouraged the cat's presence because of its capabilities at pest control. Cats tolerated man's presence because man provided warm, dry homes, as well as the occasional saucer of cream.
 
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konstargirl

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^ Francis kiiled a mouse last year( One of my sister's cats). It was a cool experience and they also killed little flies too. ^_^
 

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To me, "wild" means an animal can survive without human contact, "domesticated" are animals that depend on humans for survival. "Feral" fall somewhere in between the two in that the animal does not depend on one particular human or family, but rather depends on the human race to provide food/shelter. Most of the cats that are wandering around the cities I consider as feral. They cannot survive without humans, even though they may seem to hunt and survive without us. They are either directly (people who put food out for them) or indirectly (they hunt the birds, mice, etc drawn to human homes) dependent on us. Your basic housecat, no matter how feral, would have a hard time out in the true wilderness for very long.
 

anaugle

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Food for thought: "If you will eat it , then it's ok for your animal"
So if you eat RAW food, then feed it to your cat!
Personally I DO NOT recommend the "raw diet" as it does not have the vitamins/minerals a cat needs to sustain them for a long happy life! As some ppl have said here already, cats have been domesticated for several thousands of years and have been conditioned to the commercial food we feed generation after generation. Not to mention the parasites that live on the raw food that don't get cooked off will probably harm your cat.
So PLEASE.....don't feed raw food.
 

sirdarksol

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Actually, anaugle, raw meat has nutrients that cooked meat does not (such as taurine). Cooked foods need to have more additives than raw.
I've never met a vet who has said that the raw foods are bad for pets, either. In fact, most of them knock the commercial foods we've been feeding them for the past several decades, because it's garbage. It's the parts of the animal that we won't eat, with more grain filler than actual animal protein. Yes, we'll eat corn, but then, we'll also eat "food" that doesn't actually exist in nature, so what we eat isn't all that great of an indicator. On the other hand, the statement of "If you wouldn't eat it, then don't feed it to your pets" is an excellent one to make.
In comparison to the common commercial diets, the raw food diets use human-grade meats, for the most part. They add a minimal amount of ingredients, to cover the nutrients from other bits (eggs, insects, variety of animals, as well as the stomach contents of those animals) that a wild animal would eat.
 

gremlin

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I think the thing to remember is "raw meat diet" and "raw food diet" are not necessarily the same thing. Feeding only "raw meat" is not the same as feeding a more complete "raw food" diet that consists of meat, vegetables, whole grains, etc. Also, while there are "junk food" type prepared diets out there, there are also good quality prepared commercial foods. Basically, what you feed depends on what you can afford and what you have time to make and what your pet can tolerate. Some animals do not do well on the raw food diet because their innards cannot handle it. They may need a specialty diet. For cats (and dogs) that have allergies, or have been sick, boiled chicken and rice is supposed to be an excellent diet.
 

sirdarksol

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gremlin said:
Also, while there are "junk food" type prepared diets out there, there are also good quality prepared commercial foods.
There are, but that's not what most people think of when they say "commercial foods." I can't even get a decent commercial food at the local petsmart. either grocery store chain in my area, or any of the department stores. Each one of them leads off with some sort of meat byproduct, or with a grain. While I don't completely avoid grains in my cats' food, it shouldn't be the first thing in them. That's why I specified "common" commercial food diets. Most people have to go out of their way to get decent food that has real meat in it.

As for the rest, I agree. I don't think anyone was thinking of only feeding their pet raw meat. The question, though, was the safety and nutritional value of raw meat.
 

gremlin

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sirdarksol said:
As for the rest, I agree. I don't think anyone was thinking of only feeding their pet raw meat. The question, though, was the safety and nutritional value of raw meat.
I agree that for cats, the main ingredient should be whole meat and not a "byproduct". Raw meats should be human grade and handled as if we were eating it ourselves. In fact, sometimes I wonder if that would even be safe for cats since we cook our food. Hmmm - maybe raise chickens and rabbits to butcher and use for yourselves and your pets. New hobby!

As for feeding only raw meat, I did not see any mention of other foods in the opening post. Only that the cats were fed fresh meat and no commercial cat food...

konstargirl said:
Okay. My older sister gives her cats fresh meats everyday and she weened them off commercial cat food couple of months ago. I was wondering if giving cats fresh raw meat safe?

Thanks.
 

sirdarksol

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Gotcha. Fair enough. I took that to mean that she was feeding a diet that was made from fresh meats, but I was extrapolating, when there was no real statement of such there. You may be right, so excellent addition. ;D
 

chumzhujun

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My cat loves to eat cook chicken breast meat. It good.. Never give prawn or they will die from diabetes
 

anaugle

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I've been a Vet Tech for 8 yrs now and every Vet I know does not recommend the raw food diet. If your looking for a quality/economical dry food,then visit your local Vet hospital. They have a lot of variety for each animal with different needs.
I personally don't like the raw food diet.IMO I do not think this is safe for any animal eating it or any human preparing it.This is my opinion and in the end it's ultimately up to the owners on what they prefer to feed.
As for chumzhujun: Please do your research on animal Diabetes......prawns don't cause diabetes nor will they kill your cat(unless they have excessive amount of mercury in them)
 
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konstargirl

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Lol I didn't know it was going to be a conserversial issue on this topic since people have different opinions on it.

Well this is my sisters cats so I'm noly feeding them what she says to feed them. Ionly have one of them right now and she won't be back from Paris until Wednesday.
 

sirdarksol

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anaugle said:
I do not think this is safe for any animal eating it or any human preparing it.
I get how it could be thought that it's not safe for the animals (although cats and dogs both are built to easily handle most bacterial and parasitic issues; just be smart about the meat that you use. No pork, and be particular about where you get the meat), but how could it possibly not be safe for the person preparing it? Any time we make food with meat in it, we handle raw meat. As with any other time preparing any such dish, you've got to wash your hands and utensils afterward.

As far as the vets you've met not thinking it's good, that makes me curious if it's a regional thing. I was amazed to find out that local vets supported it. In the US, vets are shills for the pet food companies (Science Diet is one of the biggest ones for the vets), who give them pretty big bonuses for selling their food, and yet I've met a dozen vets and countless vet techs who have all said that, as long as the food is being supplemented with a few key vitamins and minerals (E, D, Taurine if the meat is coming into any contact with heat), that's great. Barring medical issues that require a very particular kind of food, they say, it's probably healthier than anything they sell.
If vets are willing to give up a source of income to say that, I take that to mean something pretty significant.
 
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