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Getting Into Live Plants.

  1. Kevin J Wint

    Kevin J Wint New Member Member

    Hello All, i have had artificial plants in my aquariums for years, however i am finding that some of my fish dont particularly enjoy having the plastic plants rub up against them, so i am looking at potentially putting in real plants as the majority of my fish prefer heavily planted aquariums.

    so my question is this:

    will i need to change my substrate? also; Which plants tend to be the lowest maintenance possible (trimming and whatnot)? Can i put plants into an aquarium that already has fish? other than stress will there be any effect on my fish well being?
     
  2. Gypsy13

    Gypsy13 Well Known Member Member

    I’m new with plants too. Don’t quite have the whole stem plant vs water column plant down yet. Siri doesn’t help at all there. Your fish will love them. You will love them. You don’t have to change your substrate. There are some that require certain things like high light, co2, etc. I’m trying to stay low light low tech cool water. You should rinse your plants in something then rinse with water before adding. Supposedly. Some say hydrogen peroxide, betadine, bleach water even potassium permanganate! I’ve not touched that nastiness since college. I’ll be watching your thread to see what you decide on.
    I do have wisteria that is doing great. And some corkscrew Vals that are coming back after a melt. I think I might need a fertilizer other than flourish excell. Good luck!
     
  3. Smalltownfishfriend

    Smalltownfishfriend Valued Member Member

    Hi! What substrate do you have? I recommend Anubis, Java fern Java moss Amazon swords and maybe jungle Val's! It should not affect your fish! They will definitely help with water quality also!!! And your fish will love it!!:)
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Kevin J Wint

    Kevin J Wint New Member Member

    how deep should my substrate be? i dont like seeing the substrate on the glass so it is about 1" think on the front and 2 sides, getting deeper the closer to the middle that you get and its about 2-1/2" - 3" deep in the middle. is 1" deep enough along the edges to plant there? also, do you recommend using seed or grown live plants?
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Kevin J Wint

    Kevin J Wint New Member Member

    i use Estes Special Spectrastone substrate, nothing special to it, i just wasn't sure if i needed to use bio active substrate.
     
  6. R

    Rob.mcc New Member Member

    Doesn't really matter how deep the substrate is as long as you can get your plants to stay put. grown live plants would be best
     
  7. Smalltownfishfriend

    Smalltownfishfriend Valued Member Member

    Sounds like it should be fine!! If the plant has a rhizome you just tie it to something.. such as a piece of driftwood! And yes I would get plants that were grown submerged! They will not melt as quickly!!
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Kevin J Wint

    Kevin J Wint New Member Member

    i dont currently have any driftwood in the tank, but i do have some in the basement ready to go i, i bought it two years ago and told my wife when i bought it that i wasn't putting it into the tank until i got into freshwater plants. i love the look of moss on driftwood. a few years back i did have a mossy piece of driftwood i took from my brothers planted tank and loved it.
     
  9. Smalltownfishfriend

    Smalltownfishfriend Valued Member Member

    G
    Great!! Post some pics when you get plants,:)
     
  10. Kapitalfisht

    Kapitalfisht Valued Member Member

    Some of my favorite plants are hornwort/coontail/foxtail. You float them, they're easy and fast growing, plus they provide good shelter for young fish and fry.

    Many varieties of hygrophila and cryptocorynes are good rooted options, too.
     
  11. -Mak-

    -Mak- Well Known Member Member

    Substrate depth is different for different plants. Small carpeting plants can make do with 1 or 2 inches, and for bigger plants like stems, crypts, and swords, 3 inches+ is better. Simply slope the substrate up towards the back of the tank. Sloping is also a common technique used in aquascaping to make the tank look like it goes farther back that it really does. Since you have gravel I'd still to larger plants and plants that don't need to be buried.

    Never buy seeds, you'll notice that reputable online plant stores (and hopefully LFSs) don't sell them, because they aren't what they're marketed to be and sometimes aren't even aquatic.
     

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