Getting frustrated....

FinzDeep

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Good morning everyone. I am sure my answer is somewhere in this forum but the threads I have read so far have not helped so I am hoping someone can point me in the right direction. I recently set up my 25 gallon tank and have the following in it and using the following equipment:

- Aqueon QuietFlow LED PRO Aquarium Power Filter, size 20, 125 GPH
- Pure Water Pebbles Bio-Activ Live African Cichlid Aquarium Substrate, Rift Lake, 20-lb bag
- Fluval 100W Heater
- LED light cover (white light and blue light)
- 1 large plastic driftwood
- 1 Pleco given to me with the tank which is about 5 inches
- 1 Betta fish which I had in another tank for over 2 years
- 1 small catfish looking fish about 2 inches (not sure what kind it is) also given to me with the tank
- 6 moss balls

Problem - Cloudy water and super fast algae growth

When I first set the tank up everything was fine the first week. After that I noticed the water starting to get cloudy and turning green. It got worse for a few more days and I finally did a water change. Tank cleared up and not even 2 days later the water started turning cloudy and green again. When testing the water nitrates were super high as well as the PH. I guess I should mention that I do use tap water and then water conditioner.

I do not keep the light on all the time. Probably 8-10 hours during the day and at night I either shut it off or use the blue light.

I have attached a pic of my current situation.

Any help would be appreciated as this is extremely frustrating. I know that have a tank requires work and I am fine with that but to me this doesn't seem normal.

Thanks in advance
 

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Ghelfaire

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Reduse your lighting to 7 hours max and don't use the blue light all night. I'm not 100% if blue light said with growing algae but it's better to be safe.
Are you adding the water conditioner to the bucket of new water or directly to the tank?
Is your tank near a window?
More live plants will also help outcompete algae for resources and reduce it a bit.
 
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FinzDeep

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Ghelfaire said:
Reduse your lighting to 7 hours max and don't use the blue light all night. I'm not 100% if blue light said with growing algae but it's better to be safe.
Are you adding the water conditioner to the bucket of new water or directly to the tank?
Is your tank near a window?
More live plants will also help outcompete algae for resources and reduce it a bit.
Thanks for your reply. I did experiment a bit and left the light completely off and it still got worse. Tanks is about 4 feet from a window with no direct sun. I use the Python No Spill Clean and Fill System directly hooked up to sink faucet. After I fill I do the water conditioner.
 

AmnScott

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Looks like you have a bloom of free floating algae. To piggy back on the reply above, I noticed the tank sits next to a window. Is there any exposure to direct sunlight on the tank? I would imagine this is what is causing the algae. And yes, blue light can cause algae if left on all night IME.

A popular method for combating algae is performing an Aquarium "Black Out". Basically keeping the lights off for a couple days, and if needed, safely covering the tank with something to shield it from residual or direct sunlight. A UV sterilizer, which can be purchased at some pet stores or fish stores, will usually clear up an algae bloom in a week. If the Blackout doesn't work.

Hope this helps.

Edit: I just now saw that you replied while I was making this comment. If it is not seeing direct sunlight, then I would reduce the lighting times and especially the blue light exposure to prevent further algae growth.
 

SnookusFish

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I agree with above. Another thing that would help would be to get a load of fast growing plants. Even just temporarily until it clears up. Floating plants would be the best, someting like duckweed or water lettuce.
 

lilirose

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A tank doesn't need direct sunlight for the sunlight to be an issue. Being 4 feet from a window would likely cause it to get enough ambient sunlight to cause a problem.

Frequent water changes help (frequent enough so you never say "I finally did a water change"). Also, I would not use the tank light for more than a couple of hours a day maximum, as you have the light from the window and no live plants.

Adding live plants would also help, but you would need to either add a lot of them or use ones that grow very fast. Floating plants are the easiest ones that fit the bill.
 

smee82

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Daphnia will eat the algae that causes green water and in turn be eaten by your fish. you can get find daphnia in almost any natural waterways.

but you still will have to address the cause, i wouldnt keep the lights on for longer then 6 hrs a day and you will need to do weekly water changes. One last thing if its a common pleco its bioload will be to high for your filter to handle.
 

deadhead

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A UV sterilizer will quickly destroy free floating algae. Based off of the tanks inhabitants I'd try API Algaefix as your fish should be able to handle its toxic punch and it does claim to eliminate floating algae. It will cost a lot less than a UV sterilizer.
First question I have is how long has the tank been set up and running. Also, since you don't know what kind of catfish you have can you include a picture? Yes it's important we know that. Oh yea, it doesn't matter if your light is on 5, 6, 7, 8 or even 9 hours but for the time being just keep it off. Algae thrive on light and the fish don't really care for it. The light is for your viewing pleasure and since you don't care for what you're seeing, just keep it off until the water clears up.
 

IngeniousGeos

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Change your bulbs in your hood, they are probably old, and that will contribute to major algae growth.

8 - 10 hours is FARRRR too much light, especially for a small tank with no plants. I have fully planted aquariums, and my lights are on for 5-6 hours a day max.

Take a sheet and cover the tank over for a few days, reduce your feeding, and conduct water changes daily.

Yes, relocate away from the window if possible.

Make sure your food expiration hasn't passed. Bad food is another factor.

Buy some plants, and make sure they a good water column feeders. The plants will compete with the algae and starve them.


20190402_172856.jpg
 
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FinzDeep

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deadhead said:
A UV sterilizer will quickly destroy free floating algae. Based off of the tanks inhabitants I'd try API Algaefix as your fish should be able to handle its toxic punch and it does claim to eliminate floating algae. It will cost a lot less than a UV sterilizer.
First question I have is how long has the tank been set up and running. Also, since you don't know what kind of catfish you have can you include a picture? Yes it's important we know that. Oh yea, it doesn't matter if your light is on 5, 6, 7, 8 or even 9 hours but for the time being just keep it off. Algae thrive on light and the fish don't really care for it. The light is for your viewing pleasure and since you don't care for what you're seeing, just keep it off until the water clears up.
Deadhead thanks for your reply. Ever since I posted this it seems the tank cleared up on its own. How? I have no idea lol. What happened was I went to visit my mom for 2 days and I kept the light off. When I got home the tank was crystal clear. Pretty amazing. The catfish is a Cory catfish. I did order a UV sterilizer and waiting for it to arrive. I read up on it and sounded like that would help. I have since stocked the tank with a few more fish and a couple of live plants and everything is thriving. Here's a pic.
 

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FinzDeep

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Thanks everyone for your advice and suggestions! See my reply and pic to deadhead. You guys are awesome!
 

deadhead

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A UV will totally work on free floating algae. Even if the tank cleared it's a good tool to have on hand if you stay in the hobby long term. You might want to read up on corydoras a little. They're a schooling fish and like to be in a school of their own type of cory. Being by itself actually stresses them out.
 
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FinzDeep

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deadhead said:
A UV will totally work on free floating algae. Even if the tank cleared it's a good tool to have on hand if you stay in the hobby long term. You might want to read up on corydoras a little. They're a schooling fish and like to be in a school of their own type of cory. Being by itself actually stresses them out.
I did not know that. The pleco and corydora was given to me by the tanks previous owner. I'll read up on it and get a few more.
 

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