General Question - Fish Fighting

Candace

Valued Member
Messages
53
Reaction score
24
Points
18
Experience
Just started
So I was paying alot of attention (and still am) to one of my guppies that seems to be sick, when I saw my smallest Elephant ear guppy get attacked by three of my other guppies, they ripped up his back tail fin. I immediately removed him from the tank because he was not defending himself he would just swim away for a few inches. I put him in my cleaned critter keeper with a plant and water from the tank (I was letting it float in the main tank so the temp wouldn't drop). I got ready for work and when I came back he was dead. I know the other guppies didn't mortally wound him they just bit his tail. But thinking back he never ate at feeding time, but, that didn't worry me because it looked like he was foraging the rest of the time and he had energy even though he didn't swim with the other guppies. My question is (actually I have two): "Can other fish sense when another fish is about to die, and will they attack that weaker fish?" and "Is there any way to guess the age of a fish before you buy?" This might have to do with age because he didn't really look or act sick or infected. (sorry that's technically 3).
 

Crazycoryfishlady

Well Known Member
Messages
2,075
Reaction score
1,222
Points
148
Experience
5 to 10 years
Yes fish know when another fish is feeling weakened andnsometimes pick on them.
Though its not abnormal for healthy gupoies to totally take off tails and fins.
I have had a few boys become stub tails and eventually grow them back while being healthy and no illness.

There sort of are methods, but mostly for larger fish. Its very hard to tell the age of a guppy based on coloring or activity level as older males can exhibit the same behavior and coloration of younger ones.

It's possible there could be internal parasites.
A lot of store guppies are extremely inbred and unhealthy, and lack of appetite could be due to parasites but also not be noticable or make a change in general foraging.
Continue to watch as you have been, maybe look into parasite treatments as these fish are all new and treating new fish can be very helpful.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #3

Candace

Valued Member
Messages
53
Reaction score
24
Points
18
Experience
Just started
Yes fish know when another fish is feeling weakened andnsometimes pick on them.
Though its not abnormal for healthy gupoies to totally take off tails and fins.
I have had a few boys become stub tails and eventually grow them back while being healthy and no illness.

There sort of are methods, but mostly for larger fish. Its very hard to tell the age of a guppy based on coloring or activity level as older males can exhibit the same behavior and coloration of younger ones.

It's possible there could be internal parasites.
A lot of store guppies are extremely inbred and unhealthy, and lack of appetite could be due to parasites but also not be noticable or make a change in general foraging.
Continue to watch as you have been, maybe look into parasite treatments as these fish are all new and treating new fish can be very helpful.
Is Seachem Paraguard any good? My one cobra guppy has no appetite and little energy. I do use a treatment whenever I introduce new fish, it fights disease and helps heal split fins, but it doesn't fight parasites (and yeah I'm thinking of buying straight from breeders, today was the 2nd day I came home with a female when I bought a "male"). I've separated the female so she doesn't get too stressed as i have 7 other males in the tank that IMMEDIATELY recognized her as female.
 

GuppyDazzle

Well Known Member
Messages
885
Reaction score
756
Points
128
Experience
More than 10 years
The first thing you should do to solve the problem is to get a test kit, preferably an API Master Test Kit. It will test for pH, ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates. Without knowing what your water parameters are, there's no way to tell if you have a sick fish, conflict with stocking, or a tank with high toxin levels.

Fish will get aggressive if water parameters are not good. If a fish dies, you need to look at your water right away. Usually it is a problem with water. If your tests show that ammonia, nitrites, or nitrates are where they should be, then you can look at other causes. But most of the problems like this are caused by bad water parameters, which can be made much worse when the tank is cycling.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #5

Candace

Valued Member
Messages
53
Reaction score
24
Points
18
Experience
Just started
The first thing you should do to solve the problem is to get a test kit, preferably an API Master Test Kit. It will test for pH, ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates. Without knowing what your water parameters are, there's no way to tell if you have a sick fish, conflict with stocking, or a tank with high toxin levels.

Fish will get aggressive if water parameters are not good. If a fish dies, you need to look at your water right away. Usually it is a problem with water. If your tests show that ammonia, nitrites, or nitrates are where they should be, then you can look at other causes. But most of the problems like this are caused by bad water parameters, which can be made much worse when the tank is cycling.
I bought the test strips which told me the parameters are okay. But I’ve been seeing some negative reviews about them. Unfortunately I’m on a tight budget for the next week and a half.
 

GuppyDazzle

Well Known Member
Messages
885
Reaction score
756
Points
128
Experience
More than 10 years
Test strips can be inconsistent and unreliable. They're also vulnerable to absorbing elements through the air that can skew results. Definitely try to get an indicator test kit (test tubes) like the API kit as soon as you can. I believe they're 20 or 25 bucks on Amazon.

Here's a tip when discussing water parameters. It's common for people to use terms like "fine," or "within limits," or "perfect" when describing water parameters. It's the actual test readings that are helpful in trying to diagnose a problem in your aquarium. Your parameters might be at a "safe" level, but there can be clues in the actual readings. There is a thread on the FAQs that talks about giving actual readings when discussing water test readings.

As long as you don't go overboard, it's almost impossible to do too many partial water changes, and more water changes are usually the answer to problems with aquariums. Match the temperature as closely as possible, and make sure you use water conditioner. I try not to do any water changes over 50% unless it's an emergency like an ammonia spike, but you'll need a good test kit to tell you that. I'd recommend you do a 50% water change today, then 25% every other day until you can get the toxin levels nailed down.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #8

Candace

Valued Member
Messages
53
Reaction score
24
Points
18
Experience
Just started
Test strips can be inconsistent and unreliable. They're also vulnerable to absorbing elements through the air that can skew results. Definitely try to get an indicator test kit (test tubes) like the API kit as soon as you can. I believe they're 20 or 25 bucks on Amazon.

Here's a tip when discussing water parameters. It's common for people to use terms like "fine," or "within limits," or "perfect" when describing water parameters. It's the actual test readings that are helpful in trying to diagnose a problem in your aquarium. Your parameters might be at a "safe" level, but there can be clues in the actual readings. There is a thread on the FAQs that talks about giving actual readings when discussing water test readings.

As long as you don't go overboard, it's almost impossible to do too many partial water changes, and more water changes are usually the answer to problems with aquariums. Match the temperature as closely as possible, and make sure you use water conditioner. I try not to do any water changes over 50% unless it's an emergency like an ammonia spike, but you'll need a good test kit to tell you that. I'd recommend you do a 50% water change today, then 25% every other day until you can get the toxin levels nailed down.
Hey haven’t used water conditioner, I don’t use tap water. I probably won’t ever. I get Spring water from the store and it makes a difference.
 
Last edited:
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #9

Candace

Valued Member
Messages
53
Reaction score
24
Points
18
Experience
Just started
The stress alone from being bullied can kill a fish...
The thing with that though is I never saw Cypress being bullied before that. That’s why I was so shocked. I mean they got vicious. His beautiful tail was torn up within a couple of minutes.
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom