Geez, Tainted water supply

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_Fried_Bettas_

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Before I got Flash I was using test strips and thought everything was fine in my tanks. I recently started using API Master Kit. I still don't have much problem with my 10 gallon, but I couldn't get rid of ammonia readings in Flash's tank. I thought I was simply going through a mini-cycle due to a little too thorough cleaning and the introduction of Flash to the tank. So I've been doing about a 1/3 water change daily and the readings actually got worse. It finally crossed my mind to test the water before I put it in the tank, and that water was worse than the water in the tank. I'm getting ammonia readings of about .75 ppm from the tap water. I guess I'm going to have to start buying bottled water for my fish. I don't even drink bottled water, lol. But after this I'm starting to wonder if I should be drinking the tap water either.
 

Shawnie

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Id call your local water company...that sounds dangerous for humans let along fish ..
 

joy613

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You will find most communities have ammonia in the water the only thing they do is put in more chlorine in to take care of it. It is usually reported by people with aquarium problems. I did a google search on ammonia in bottled and found a few years ago there was even ammonia and ammonia like substances in bottled water. I use atison's betta spa in my tanks, on the back it says it binds with the ammonia in the water. I don't know if that is why I don't have any real problems or the live plants I have.
 

Jizzy

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Don't quote me on this ,but isn't ammonia in tap water an indicator of chloramines? My tap has ammonia and is taken care of really fast by the filter.
 

COBettaCouple

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When are you testing in relation to when you do the water change?
 
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_Fried_Bettas_

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I test my tank before I change the water, but I have been changing the water daily (about 30%) since I have been having ammonia readings. The test I did to the tap was before adding any conditioner. I was using Tetra Aquasafe, but I just got a bottle of F&S Stabilize which is supposed to neutralize ammonia as well as chlorine. Tomorrow I will do some tests to see how much I need to add to get 0 ammonia readings from the conditioned tap water.
 

chickadee

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Your local water supply company is required by law to run tests on the water supply and have on hand for anyone who asks (and usually supply with your bill annually) copies of the results of those tests showing what is contained in the water. Ours came in the last utility bill and I was surprised to find that 4 locations had fines and violations for high nitrate levels already this year. While the main water supply is only at 11 for nitrates so far the farmers are not starting to add chemicals to the ground around here yet and this is scary. By midsummer after the fertilizers and weed killers and all have been added and the rains have washed them into our water our nitrates and other chemicals can and probably will reach harmful levels. Ammonia in the water supply (I read on a site that keeps track of water testing) can mean that there were battlefields or some sites nearby that contained bodies buried without proper processing. (many, many years ago) and the chemicals used to treat the water (like chloramine and such) are meant to counteract the harmful effects of any type of things that appear in the supply of the tap water that we drink. I was horrified to find on the bottom of the report of our water supply though a warning that babies under 6 months old could be irreversibly harmed by drinking water with nitrates at the levels found at the 4 locations that were in violation status in our area. It gave the locations but I am wondering how long they may have drank the water at those levels before they were notified.
It also makes me wonder if any fish were in those locations and how many died. Infants under 6 months of age would certainly be as sturdy as a fish in many cases and not forced to live in the water 24 hours a day 7 days a week.

Rose
 

susitna-flower

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The really good news is that even if you have ammonia in your tap water, as soon as the bacteria build up in Flash's tank, it will convert even the tap water ammonia into nitrite...This is why your 10 gallon doesn't read the same, it's nitrogen cycle is working!
 

andy65

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I love have a well. Nothing but clean clear H2O.
 

chickadee

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You may still have nitrates or nitrites as the farms around here with their own wells sometimes have a bigger problem with their water than the city water. You still need to test it. It is the ground water supply that is contaminated not just the city water supply. This affects wells as well as the aquifers.

Rose
 

andy65

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Nope not a thing. We live 50 feet for a field and every is fine. 0 anything. We just have lots of iron and hardish water. GH was about 8-11* The water drains good and away from us.
 

Jizzy

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to COBettaCouple: Around 5 hours or so
 

COBettaCouple

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If you test within 24 hours of a water change, there is a chance of getting inaccurate readings, even with a liquid test.
Jizzy said:
to COBettaCouple: Around 5 hours or so
 

Jizzy

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Alright, I'll keep that in mind. Thanks
 

pamd

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COBettaCouple said:
If you test within 24 hours of a water change, there is a chance of getting inaccurate readings, even with a liquid test.
Interesting. Why?
 

andy65

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It give the new water to mix with the old. If you where to take a reading right after you did a WC you would get hit and miss readings.
 

COBettaCouple

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Yea, giving the filtration time to mix up the water real good and 'even out' allows you to get a more accurate reading. Usually 2 days is good, but when doing daily water changes, testing right before the water change is pretty reliable.
 
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