Full Spectrum Lighting Harmful to Humans?

KeegansTropiks

Hello I have just purchased the Chihiros WRGB 2 Slim 30 and have installed it and connected it to my phone via App.

I want to know if these lights are harmful to humans, can it cause eye damage or skin problems? I have my tank setup in my room and when I stare at the tank over time it irritates my eyes.

If so what could I do to avoid this issue? Maybe turn the lights on in the day and off at night? Or maybe always set them below 20%?

I really like the look the lights give my tank but if it will cause harm to my eyes I would rather stick to a low tech light….

Any response would be helpful thanks
 

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MacZ

Lights that produce UV light (which is indeed harmful) have to have warnings on the packaging or in the instructions. Especially with a high end company like this one this would certainly be printed on there somewhere. If not - No UV, so it's safe.

Your eyes hurting is the normal reaction to too bright light. I get a headache on a sunny day. Tune down the intensity to a level you can easily work with.

Maybe turn the lights on in the day and off at night?
Of course turn them off at night! A tank shouldn't get more than 12 hours of light anyway. And if you have the tank in your room where you sleep, of course turn them off (completely dark) as light at the wrong time of day messes with your circadian cycle, full spectrum or not.
 

ruud

That brightness is sufficient to light your entire house.

All my lights reach 20% of their full potential around 14:00. Before and after, brightness is less. That said, different tank, different intentions.

Your substrate seems to indicate you are after "carpets". Lowering the position of the light unit / bring it closer to the tank, would help. And yes, time controlling the brightness also. This is algae explosion waiting to happen.
 

KeegansTropiks

Lights that produce UV light (which is indeed harmful) has to have warnings on the packaging or in the instructions. Especially with a high end company like this one this would certainly be printed on there somewhere. If not - No UV, so it's safe.

Your eyes hurting is the normal reaction to too bright light. I get a headache on a sunny day. Tune down the intensity to a level you can easily work with.


Of course turn them off at night! A tank shouldn't get more than 12 hours of light anyway. And if you have the tank in your room where you sleep, of course turn them off (completely dark) as light at the wrong time of day messes with your circadian cycle, full spectrum or not.
Thanks for the reply, I’ve checked the packaging and instructions, no warning or mention of UV so I assume it’s non UV ?

Yep I’ve turned it way down to 18% and my eyes stopped hurting, will this mean less plant growth or will it still be okey will lower Britney’s but full spectrum?

And yes lol I turn my tanks off at night, I usually give the tank 6-7 hours of light only.
That brightness is sufficient to light your entire house.

All my lights reach 20% of their full potential around 14:00. Before and after, brightness is less. That said, different tank, different intentions.

Your substrate seems to indicate you are after "carpets". Lowering the position of the light unit / bring it closer to the tank, would help. And yes, time controlling the brightness also. This is algae explosion waiting to happen.
I know right my whole room was as bright as a Bulb, so I’ve turned them down around 18 - 23 %

Unfortunately I cannot lower the light closer to the tank, I want to know if this brightness is okay for plant growth.
Also, I’m new to the light spectrum I’m not sure how much blue/red/green to keep on.

Im after the carpeting plant on the rocks to take off and spread. Hopefully I don’t get any algae.

I’ll send a screenshot of my app to show you guys how much light is on.
 

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MacZ

no warning or mention of UV so I assume it’s non UV ?
Correct.
Yep I’ve turned it way down to 18% and my eyes stopped hurting, will this mean less plant growth or will it still be okey will lower Britney’s but full spectrum?
To be honest, I'm a fishkeeper not a underwater-gardener, so I can't tell you anything about the spectrum, but less intensity surely influences growth.

My advice: Listen to ruud.
 

ruud

Yes, I love to garden underwater :)
 

MacZ

Yes, I love to garden underwater :)
I know, that's why I recommend listening to you when it comes to plants.
 

ruud

I know, that's why I recommend listening to you when it comes to plants.
Just dim the lights ;)
I know right my whole room was as bright as a Bulb, so I’ve turned them down around 18 - 23 %

Unfortunately I cannot lower the light closer to the tank, I want to know if this brightness is okay for plant growth.
Also, I’m new to the light spectrum I’m not sure how much blue/red/green to keep on.

Im after the carpeting plant on the rocks to take off and spread. Hopefully I don’t get any algae.

I’ll send a screenshot of my app to show you guys how much light is on.
Light theory and plant growth is.... pretty complex.

Based on your screenshot, and cutting corners (which I love to do):

Blue is photosynthesis, red is flowering, green is for personal pleasure (watching blue + red light is very unpleasant). Are there any pre-sets? Choose one (I believe there are; the "Green" setting; just see to it blue is not dialed to zero :)

Color temp is mostly personal pleasure also, it's a debatable parameter with respect to spectrum output, but cutting corners, I would set it somewhere around 6500K.

Intensity is what you should focus on and at least time-control (the intensity).

+++++

Regarding your approach. Starting somewhere with a few plants in the hope it'll cover your substrate, without any issues along the way, is wishful thinking. These are pretty much the most challenging tanks. You should really do some research before starting ...oops too late.

For starters, there is a good reason why "underwater-gardners" make use of a "dry start" for tanks that are dominated with carpets. It's one of the very few techniques I don't find to be a gimmick and makes great sense.

Here's a vid of one of the most famous or challenging carpets, HC, in nature:
...mostly emersed...

Here's one of many, many videos of carpets in an aquarium:

For sure, the dry start was used in the beginning for this tank as well. Also notice the shape of the tank....shallow. Very typical. Not mandatory, but makes a difference in scope of algae prevention. So your flex tank is going to be challenge, no doubt.

On the other hand, it's not one way only.

Here's an image of one of my own tanks. Fairly shallow tank. Few months old. But.... no CO2, no heater and very dim lights (I increased the lights briefly to take a picture):


jungle.jpeg

All plants are growing pretty well, but the carpets grow only very, very, very slowly.
Weeping moss, Eleocharis acicularis, Monte Carlo, Marsilea Crenata.

Takes at least another year before the stones in the substrate are getting covered a bit. But I'm not moving anywhere, so I have the patience. And importantly, almost no visible algae.

The only two fish inhabitants in this tank. Sorry, completely off-topic.

IMG_20220729_173340429_HDR.jpg
 

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