Freshwater Shrimp and Cross-breeding

darrylzuk

I'm working to stock a 29g planted community tank and have been contemplating adding shrimp for a while now. Currently, there are aout 15 MTS, a bunch of ramshorn and bladder snails, 2 nerites, a mystery snail, a school or corys (6), and a school of lambchop rasboras (8). The plants, driftwood, and snails have been in the tank since July, but the fish are recent (~2 weeks) additions. Substrate is Caribsea Supernaturals Sunset Gold sand. I have two HOB filters (Aquaclear 70 and Penguin 200) that have sponges on their intakes and soap dishes filled with Matrix to baffle the spillways. Water parameters are all stable. I'm going to test after work today and can update the post with numbers. As someone who would be new to keeping shrimp, I think it's best for me to stick to neocaridinas for now, as they seem to be best for beginners. I do have a couple questions.

First and foremost, should I wait for my tank to mature longer before adding shrimp? I know they are sensitive to changing water parameters, and have all the necessary items to drip acclimate them for as long as necessary. Secondly, there are so many colors to choose from that I've been hard-pressed to settle on just one. I think the bloody mary, orange pumpkin, snowball, and red/black rili all look stunning. I've read that having multiple colonies of different breeds can lead to cross-breeding and ultimately having them revert back to the more natural color of the wild form. But I've also read that some shrimp won't cross breed. I'm assuming this is because they're actually different species? Will all colors/types of neocaridina davidi cross-breed, or are their certain colors that stick to themselves? Finally are the rili varieties, or any certain colors, any less hardy or more difficult to keep? I'd probably want to avoid them for my first foray.

Thanks!
 

Pfrozen

Shrimp from the Caridina species will interbreed but Caridina and Neocaridina will not. Neocaridina will interbreed with Neocardina as well obviously. So technically you could keep red cherry shrimp with crystal reds without worrying but Caridina shrimp need totally different parameters ie. Remineralized RO water. Chances are if you have two different shrimp surviving in the same tank they will be capable of interbreeding
 
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darrylzuk

Shrimp from the Caridina species will interbreed but Caridina and Neocaridina will not. Neocaridina will interbreed with Neocardina as well obviously. So technically you could keep red cherry shrimp with crystal reds without worrying but Caridina shrimp need totally different parameters ie. Remineralized RO water. Chances are if you have two different shrimp surviving in the same tank they will be capable of interbreeding

Got it, so only keep one unless I'm okay with mixing and "less desirable" colors cropping up in future generations. Thanks!
 
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ProudPapa

I haven't been keeping shrimp for very long, but have done quite a bit of research, and will try to help.
  1. If your tank has been running since July it should be ready for shrimp.
  2. As far as one color being more hardy than others, as far as I know the red varieties might be hardier just because they've been around longer, so undesirable traits that would affect health have a better chance of being eliminated.
  3. It looks like Pfrozen answered your question about breeding.
 
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Argos

Good advise above. All correct. I don't find one color being more hardy than others, pretty much all are captive bred.
Got it, so only keep one unless I'm okay with mixing and "less desirable" colors cropping up in future generations. Thanks!
Be advised that the next generation will revert to the natural color. (brown) And the fact that each shrimp will birth 20-30 shrimplets which will be impossible to manually remove all. (unless you separate the pregnant females, which is harder to accomplish than initial thought) You then run a completely probable chance that after one generation you will revert all generation back to natural brown. My suggestion is to just choose whichever color you like best. (agree neo are easier to keep)

You probably will end up buying several small tanks to keep several different colors anyways!
 
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richiep

Well after reading all the above I'll sit back and have a cup of tea, there's nothing for me to say
 
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kansas

What about two colors that are close to each other, say red and orange? Would you get varying shades of red/orange, or would they revert to the wild color?
 
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darrylzuk

What about two colors that are close to each other, say red and orange? Would you get varying shades of red/orange, or would they revert to the wild color?
That's was I was wondering, specifically with the bloody marys and the pumpkins!
 
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jpaquatics

That's was I was wondering, specifically with the bloody marys and the pumpkins!
I believe bloody Mary’s and pumpkins are derived from completely different lineages on the Neocaridina tree, so those would most likely revert to a wild type.
 
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ProudPapa

Good advise above. All correct. I don't find one color being more hardy than others, pretty much all are captive bred.

Be advised that the next generation will revert to the natural color. (brown) And the fact that each shrimp will birth 20-30 shrimplets which will be impossible to manually remove all. (unless you separate the pregnant females, which is harder to accomplish than initial thought) You then run a completely probable chance that after one generation you will revert all generation back to natural brown. My suggestion is to just choose whichever color you like best. (agree neo are easier to keep)

You probably will end up buying several small tanks to keep several different colors anyways!

I have one small correction to the underlined sentence above. The first generation won't necessarily revert to brown. It may take several. For instance, I have a shrimp that's dark blue front and back and clear in the middle. She was in my red tank for a while, and her offspring are marked very similar, but are a light red shade instead of the dark blue.
 
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Argos

I have one small correction to the underlined sentence above. The first generation won't necessarily revert to brown. It may take several. For instance, I have a shrimp that's dark blue front and back and clear in the middle. She was in my red tank for a while, and her offspring are marked very similar, but are a light red shade instead of the dark blue.
I stand corrected! I have experimented with several colors and almost all first generation have all turned out natural color. It also might depend on the strain/color.

Either way: my vote is to not mix.
 
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-Mak-

You can try a neocaridina species, some amanos, and a hardier caridina species if your water is not too hard. That's 3 different shrimp!
Take a look around Aquatic Arts for some ideas. They have a lot of different species. It's mostly the popular bee type caridinas that have stricter parameter requirements. Tigers and Babaultis are said to be more tolerant

I do recommend having a GH/KH test kit and TDS meter regardless of what shrimp you decide on
 
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