Freshwater Or Saltwater?

Daniel Kraus
  • #1
I am not new to the hobby, and I am not sure where to post this. But I will be setting up a new 55 gallon tank soon. I was curious as to whether or not I should do fresh or salt water. I love them both but I’m not quite sure which to go with. So any opinions will be appreciated.
 
ValerieAdams
  • #2
Hmmm, tough decision. Do you have other tanks running right now? If so, what?
 
Daniel Kraus
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
Hmmm, tough decision. Do you have other tanks running right now? If so, what?
A 20 gallon freshwater. And a freshwater pond. I used to have more but stopped for a while so now I’m getting more and more tanks.
 
ValerieAdams
  • #4
Well if you already have freshwater, I say go for salt!
 
Daniel Kraus
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
Well if you already have freshwater, I say go for salt!
I might have too they seem really interesting.
 
ValerieAdams
  • #6
stella1979 can offer some really good advice for you
 
Nachococodrilo
  • #7
I am not new to the hobby, and I am not sure where to post this. But I will be setting up a new 55 gallon tank soon. I was curious as to whether or not I should do fresh or salt water. I love them both but I’m not quite sure which to go with. So any opinions will be appreciated.
Just remember that salwater is more expensive and needs more equipment.
Especialy if you are getting corals
 
Daniel Kraus
  • Thread Starter
  • #8
Just remember that salwater is more expensive and needs more equipment.
Especialy if you are getting corals
Well yeah I’m prepared for the costs associated it’s just deciding which to do.
 
Nachococodrilo
  • #9
Well yeah I’m prepared for the costs associated it’s just deciding which to do.
Then saltwater's a great choice beautiful fish to choose from
 
Daniel Kraus
  • Thread Starter
  • #10
Then saltwater's a great choice beautiful fish to choose from
True just a bit daunting. Or it at least seems that way
 
Nachococodrilo
  • #11
Daniel Kraus
  • Thread Starter
  • #12
The different parameters and filter media’s and everything. Just different from freshwater but exciting.
 
ValerieAdams
  • #13
True just a bit daunting. Or it at least seems that way
Just wait until Stella chimes in, she has a way of making it seem simple and easy. Once you have all the necessities, it will be great! You can do it! Culprit & Lchi87 are other good ones to talk to
 
Daniel Kraus
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
Just wait until Stella chimes in, she has a way of making it seem simple and easy. Once you have all the necessities, it will be great! You can do it! Culprit & Lchi87 are other good ones to talk to
I did some research and talked to some others about it. I’ll make sure I’m ready before diving in that’s for sure.
 
stella1979
  • #15
I also vote for a salty tank! They aren't as hard as they seem and can be done on a budget. It is true that more equipment is needed but I certainly think it's worth it. As for the equipment itself, it's all much simpler than it seems once you start wrapping your mind around it. For example, in a saltwater system, the rock within the tank will host beneficial bacteria, (among other critters), and hold your cycle for you. This is why we can usually use additional filtration equipment for nutrient export, or more simply, the removal of nitrates and phosphates. This is where refugiums and skimmers come in, and I promise, these things that sound so alien are actually quite simple.

So, a 55 gallon you say? That's a decent size that you'll have a lot of saltwater fish options for... though none of the really big guys as a 55 isn't very wide. Also, the bigger and deeper a tank is, the more expensive it is to light for corals. However, when first starting out, it's a great idea to stick with a FOWLR tank, (fish only with live rock), to sort of get your feet wet and familiarize yourself with things. This way, the aquarist is more comfortable with things before adding more sensitive creatures like corals and anemones. Plus, lighting is something that should have some serious consideration, but you can have some nice salty fish to look at while researching which will be the best reef light for your system.

So, if you do decide to go with saltwater, go ahead and make a build thread over in the Saltwater Beginners forum, and we will be glad to help set you up with the right equipment. Hope to see you there!
 
Daniel Kraus
  • Thread Starter
  • #16
I also vote for a salty tank! They aren't as hard as they seem and can be done on a budget. It is true that more equipment is needed but I certainly think it's worth it. As for the equipment itself, it's all much simpler than it seems once you start wrapping your mind around it. For example, in a saltwater system, the rock within the tank will host beneficial bacteria, (among other critters), and hold your cycle for you. This is why we can usually use additional filtration equipment for nutrient export, or more simply, the removal of nitrates and phosphates. This is where refugiums and skimmers come in, and I promise, these things that sound so alien are actually quite simple.

So, a 55 gallon you say? That's a decent size that you'll have a lot of saltwater fish options for... though none of the really big guys as a 55 isn't very wide. Also, the bigger and deeper a tank is, the more expensive it is to light for corals. However, when first starting out, it's a great idea to stick with a FOWLR tank, (fish only with live rock), to sort of get your feet wet and familiarize yourself with things. This way, the aquarist is more comfortable with things before adding more sensitive creatures like corals and anemones. Plus, lighting is something that should have some serious consideration, but you can have some nice salty fish to look at while researching which will be the best reef light for your system.

So, if you do decide to go with saltwater, go ahead and make a build thread over in the Saltwater Beginners forum, and we will be glad to help set you up with the right equipment. Hope to see you there!
I’ll make a post over there and we’ll see what happens then.
 
Nachococodrilo
  • #17
I also vote for a salty tank! They aren't as hard as they seem and can be done on a budget. It is true that more equipment is needed but I certainly think it's worth it. As for the equipment itself, it's all much simpler than it seems once you start wrapping your mind around it. For example, in a saltwater system, the rock within the tank will host beneficial bacteria, (among other critters), and hold your cycle for you. This is why we can usually use additional filtration equipment for nutrient export, or more simply, the removal of nitrates and phosphates. This is where refugiums and skimmers come in, and I promise, these things that sound so alien are actually quite simple.

So, a 55 gallon you say? That's a decent size that you'll have a lot of saltwater fish options for... though none of the really big guys as a 55 isn't very wide. Also, the bigger and deeper a tank is, the more expensive it is to light for corals. However, when first starting out, it's a great idea to stick with a FOWLR tank, (fish only with live rock), to sort of get your feet wet and familiarize yourself with things. This way, the aquarist is more comfortable with things before adding more sensitive creatures like corals and anemones. Plus, lighting is something that should have some serious consideration, but you can have some nice salty fish to look at while researching which will be the best reef light for your system.

So, if you do decide to go with saltwater, go ahead and make a build thread over in the Saltwater Beginners forum, and we will be glad to help set you up with the right equipment. Hope to see you there!
If you have no corals you can use a regular led light, right?
 
Lchi87
  • #18
If you have no corals you can use a regular led light, right?
Yep! I used a Nicrew LED on my tank till I was going to add corals.
 

Similar Aquarium Threads

Replies
17
Views
684
Racing1113
Top Bottom