Flowerhorns

TJG

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Anyone with any real experience with flowerhorns? I have been considering trying to keep one but can't seem to find any solid information on tank size or tank mates or anything definitive really. All I keep seeing is that thwyare a hybrid
 
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TJG

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It was more than I had found previously. Everything else I found seemed to focus on the fact that they are a hybrid fish. One article put their size as "between ten and eighteen inches depending on the fish used to breed them". That seemed like a pretty big swing in size.
 

Cichlidnut

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I have four flowerhorns. 18 inches doesn't happen. 10-12 inches is the most common. I keep all of mine solo. They aggressive and don't mix well with others. 75 gallons is usually a good size for a single flowerhorn.
 

ljg

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King of DIY on Youtube has Frank, a flower horn, (I believe he is), his videos may give you a little idea on your flower horn.
 

Mcasella

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They can be placed with other fish, however you are't likely to get a less aggressive one and the red dragons seem pretty aggressive.
Normally you see a tank specimen (long body, not a short body) under one foot in size, most of them do not get larger than this because of the fish used to breed them. Most of them do not have that massive of a kok unless they have been bred for it (aka you'd have to buy a cute little 3 inch fish that has the kok at an already massive size for body ratio).

They can be shy when you first get them, this is normal, they should be eating in a couple a days (make sure you know what they were eating previously if you can), they should not be placed with other fish unless you have determined they are able to get along with other fish (sometimes you can raise them together when younger, but two males are going to argue over tank space and the females do not have an impressive kok unless that have been bred to grow a larger one.

They are personable fish once they have gotten used to you as a friendly/food source. I would not try to hand feed these guys as they might not have the best aim with a weight on their head.
75 works for one, make sure the decor fits its size so it can't get stuck (stacked rocks and thicker driftwood would be the best setting, no plants because they likely will get destroyed), a varied diet (one to help with improving color if you are concerned with that), and weekly maintenance will likely give you a happy healthy fish for a while. (Short bodies likely won't get over 8 inches because of the shortened spine).

The flowerhorn I just sold (right now he is in the mail which is very nerve wracking not just for me but for his new owner waiting on him) is about 7 inches, he lived previously with ~30 other cichlids including EBA, a Chocolate cichlid, a couple blood parrots, and assorted others (in way too small of a tank, with way too many different fish - no one was hurt in that tank - the only one that was damaged in their temporary tub was the chocolate cichlid, the EBA are fine still). This is not what you should expect from any flowerhorn, his temperament surprised me greatly just because he was living with so many other fish and was the largest thing in the tank besides the 8 inch rhino pleco.
 
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TJG

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Thank you for all the great information.
 

Nikki2577

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Mcasella said:
They can be placed with other fish, however you are't likely to get a less aggressive one and the red dragons seem pretty aggressive.
Normally you see a tank specimen (long body, not a short body) under one foot in size, most of them do not get larger than this because of the fish used to breed them. Most of them do not have that massive of a kok unless they have been bred for it (aka you'd have to buy a cute little 3 inch fish that has the kok at an already massive size for body ratio).

They can be shy when you first get them, this is normal, they should be eating in a couple a days (make sure you know what they were eating previously if you can), they should not be placed with other fish unless you have determined they are able to get along with other fish (sometimes you can raise them together when younger, but two males are going to argue over tank space and the females do not have an impressive kok unless that have been bred to grow a larger one.

They are personable fish once they have gotten used to you as a friendly/food source. I would not try to hand feed these guys as they might not have the best aim with a weight on their head.
75 works for one, make sure the decor fits its size so it can't get stuck (stacked rocks and thicker driftwood would be the best setting, no plants because they likely will get destroyed), a varied diet (one to help with improving color if you are concerned with that), and weekly maintenance will likely give you a happy healthy fish for a while. (Short bodies likely won't get over 8 inches because of the shortened spine).

The flowerhorn I just sold (right now he is in the mail which is very nerve wracking not just for me but for his new owner waiting on him) is about 7 inches, he lived previously with ~30 other cichlids including EBA, a Chocolate cichlid, a couple blood parrots, and assorted others (in way too small of a tank, with way too many different fish - no one was hurt in that tank - the only one that was damaged in their temporary tub was the chocolate cichlid, the EBA are fine still). This is not what you should expect from any flowerhorn, his temperament surprised me greatly just because he was living with so many other fish and was the largest thing in the tank besides the 8 inch rhino pleco.
I got Fred (flowerhorn from Mcasella) today and I have to say that Mcasella is correct with this flowerhorn. ( He has a very nice temperament and has settled in very well. With all the reading I did I decided to put him in a tank by himself just because I didn’t want to risk any injured fish. By observing him so far, he is looking for another fish in the tank but as mcasella and I discussed he will learn to own his tank and seems to be a very happy boy With this particular flowerhorn I don’t think there would have been a problem with him in my 210 gallon tank with other South American Cichlids, but almost all research shows you take a big risk by putting them with other fish unless they are docile and in a large tank. This fish has entertained me all day and night( he is amazing) the feeding is so funny because they don’t have great aim because of their kok lol just like Mcasella stated. This fish has already learned to swim pretty and do little twist to try and get me to give him more food So I am chiming in just to say Mcasella knows her stuff and takes excellent care of her fish. Her advice, which I have needed on several occasions is spot on
 
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