FlowerHorn

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Nitro Junkie

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Nice fish, did you breed him that way or did you buy him like that? I'm assuming you bought him that way, do you breed your own mix of fish?
I bought him. The only fish I have breed on purpose are guppies and convicts for feeders.
What is the difference between a flowerhorn and other types of fish? I'm confused with this hybrid stuff. Are they just fish that people bred to look a certain way? In that case, aren't most pets that way? Take dogs for instance...

Again, I'm not quite sure what a hybrid is and what they are about. The fish store by me has a huge flowerhorn that i think is awesome.

Dont chew me out too much :]
I keep fish because I like them. I have kept them for years. I know how to keep them alive and healthy,that's about it,lol. Maybe there is someone here who can offer some a more accurate explanation to hybrids,but here is what I know.

You need to have more than one species of fish breed,and produce viable off spring.Then those offspring are considered a hybrid of the 2 parent fish. So hybrids are basically mutts. With flowerhorns,there are more than just 2 fish involved,there are at least 3,possibly 4(I'm not sure though). You start with 2 different fish.Then the offspring(hybrids) breed with another pure strain fish.Then those offspring(hybrids) breed with yet another pure strain,and that gives you a flowerhorn(hopefully). Once you have your flowerhorn,if you can get a male and female flowerhorn,they will produce other flowerhorns. But of their offspring,only a handful will be a descent looking fish.

Like I said,I'm no expert. But I think that is how it works.
 

Nutter

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You need to have more than one species of fish breed,and produce viable off spring.Then those offspring are considered a hybrid of the 2 parent fish. So hybrids are basically mutts. With flowerhorns,there are more than just 2 fish involved,there are at least 3,possibly 4(I'm not sure though). You start with 2 different fish.Then the offspring(hybrids) breed with another pure strain fish.Then those offspring(hybrids) breed with yet another pure strain,and that gives you a flowerhorn(hopefully). Once you have your flowerhorn,if you can get a male and female flowerhorn,they will produce other flowerhorns. But of their offspring,only a handful will be a descent looking fish.

Like I said,I'm no expert. But I think that is how it works.
Pretty good explanation. Fish are chosen for thier physical or behaviour traits & then bread with other fish that have other desirable traits. Sometimes it is as simple as breeding two of the same species to try to achieve a certain colour or fin shape (common with guppies & bettas). Other times breeding fish are selected because they share a desirable trait, like long fins, the resulting fry should all have longer than normal fins. Subsequent generational breeding will enhance the long fins. Sometimes it takes many generations of breeding for the physical traits to develop to the 'desired' result. Unfortunately some breeders don't put much thought into how this breeding will effect the fishes ability to swim or it's long term health & it is common for deformed fish to be used in this breeding to achieve a strain of fish that shares that deformity. Like the Celestial Goldfish (bubble eyes).

That's about as far as my knowledge on hybrids goes.
 
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