Fishless Cycle 10 Gallon Tank 

  • Thread starter

npandav011

Valued Member
Messages
220
Reaction score
0
Points
101
Experience
Just started
Hi,

I am kind of stuck about the progress of my fishless tank. It has been eight days now since I started the cycle.

Equipment: Ten gallon tank, Top Fin 10 filter, no heater, cover w/ light

I first added water and dechloronated it. I added ammonia and got the level to about 5 ppm. I started to see it go down last week to about 4.0 ppm but it has not moved since. I also tested my nitrites today and I got a big fat 0. Is something wrong? Also the temp of the water is about 78 to 80 degrees F. I thought it was not possible to see a decrease in ammonia and no nitrites?

I am using the API test kits.

Help please! Thanks
 
  • Thread starter

npandav011

Valued Member
Messages
220
Reaction score
0
Points
101
Experience
Just started
I have not tested pH yet, should I?
 
  • Moderator

Lucy

Moderator
Messages
45,221
Reaction score
2,440
Points
1,383
Experience
5 to 10 years
Just hang in there and be patient. No cycles/readings follow a set of rules.
Cycling will drive you crazy if you let it.
You can test your pH to get a starting point, but it might fluctuate while the tank is cycling.
 

Kunsthure

Well Known Member
Messages
1,633
Reaction score
32
Points
143
Experience
Just started
4-5ppm of ammonia might be a little too high to get things going. I'd do a 50% water change and see if you can get it down to 2ppm or so. Also turning up the heat helps the bacteria multiply more quickly.

-Lisa
 

jetajockey

Fishlore VIP
Messages
6,744
Reaction score
97
Points
293
Experience
More than 10 years
I suggest just to hang in there and wait it out, the cycling process takes several weeks, so you may not see much in the first few weeks. Here is a snippet taken from the fishless cycle instructions on this site



"Add and Wait" Method

This is the method I have used to cycle 5 tanks (from 2.5 to 75 gallon) and it has worked perfectly. I think it is the simplest and requires the least amount of work. First add your ammonia to raise the level to 5 to 6 ppm. Now you simply wait on the ammonia to drop back to around 1 ppm. Spend the time researching the fish you like and see if they are compatible with each other, with your tap pH, tank size, etc.
 

Aquarist

Fishlore Legend
Messages
39,060
Reaction score
337
Points
458
Experience
More than 10 years
Good morning,

Have you considered adding some established filter media and substrate to the new tank for seeding, from one of your other tanks? It may not give you an instant cycle but it should help to cut down the amount of time it takes to cycle. Two weeks is a lot better than 6 or 8.

If you did decide to try seeding your tank, the beneficial bacteria in the media will still need an ammonia source.

PLEASE remember............

Ken
 

NewbieGirl

Valued Member
Messages
95
Reaction score
0
Points
101
Experience
Just started
Just wanted to say, I am in the same boat so to speak. My ammonia has done the same thing and I started May 9th. Have been at about 4 ppm for days. I am doing like the add and wait method says and waiting. Keep us posted when yours drops, it may give me hope.
 
  • Thread starter

npandav011

Valued Member
Messages
220
Reaction score
0
Points
101
Experience
Just started
I asked my LFS if I could buy filter media for my fishless cycle and they looked at me as if I was crazy. I am having trouble finding used media in DFW.

so I just need to wait it out?
 
  • Moderator

Lucy

Moderator
Messages
45,221
Reaction score
2,440
Points
1,383
Experience
5 to 10 years
Cycling can take 6 to 8 weeks, give or take a few.
Don't you wish they sold patience in a bottle! lol
 
  • Moderator

jdhef

Moderator
Messages
14,285
Reaction score
3,416
Points
583
Experience
More than 10 years

jetajockey

Fishlore VIP
Messages
6,744
Reaction score
97
Points
293
Experience
More than 10 years
Try asking them for some used gravel, and explain what your intentions are. Most LFS (privately owned) workers understand the nitrogen cycle enough to know that used gravel helps speed things along, but I've found that I have to get deep into conversation until they start throwing around the idea that their filter media houses the largest concentration of bacteria.
 
  • Thread starter

npandav011

Valued Member
Messages
220
Reaction score
0
Points
101
Experience
Just started
What's the best way to distinguish colors on the ammonia test b/c they are pretty similar? Should I hold it up to a white light, a white paper, etc.? Really noobish, I know.
 
Toggle Sidebar

New Threads

Similar Threads

Aquarium Calculator

Aquarium Photo Contests

Follow FishLore!

FishLore on Social Media





Top Bottom