Fishless cycle complete

Discussion in 'Freshwater Beginners' started by zyntec724, Jul 19, 2015.

  1. z

    zyntec724 Valued Member Member

    For those of you who have been following my projects, my fishless cycle on my 29 gal is complete. Ran all my water tests and got 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite, 20 to 30 nitrate. Just did a small water change and dosed with prime. The fish will be moved in in the morning as I need to wait for the temp to drop. Although the tank with fish is at 85F ambient, which isn't far off from the 87 the 29 was at

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  2. Dom90

    Dom90 Fishlore VIP Member

    Congratulations! 85 degrees is too high for most fish to bear...


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  3. DanB80TTS

    DanB80TTS Well Known Member Member

    could be Rams going in the tank?
     




  4. Dom90

    Dom90 Fishlore VIP Member

    Rams need 80-82, only fish that I know that like it that high around 81-86 are Boesemani Rainbowfish.


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  5. OP
    OP
    z

    zyntec724 Valued Member Member

    That 85 is just the ambient temp, no heaters running. My house doesn't have central air, and the room the tank is in is to big for a window unit. Thought about setting up a water cooler but don't really know how much control you would get over temps

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  6. Dom90

    Dom90 Fishlore VIP Member

    Yea maybe you need a chiller, most fish can't really tolerate that temp. The only time I'd bring the temp that high was for treating ich.


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  7. OP
    OP
    z

    zyntec724 Valued Member Member

    I live in Cleveland so our weather completely blows. Today we had 103 for the high, which is why the tank is so high. It should gradually drop through the night and tomorrow is supposed to be cooler. Any tips or ideas on keeping water cool in weather like this?

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  8. Dom90

    Dom90 Fishlore VIP Member

    I know some SW guys run chillers in their setups so that sounds similar to your case... LiterallyHydro any ideas?


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  9. E

    Et tu Valued Member Member

    . Any tips or ideas on keeping water cool in weather like this?

    Sure do, I live in Las Vegas where the temps are above 108* for months on end. I keep my ac at 85*, i keep small desk type fans above the water surface it keeps my tanks at 77-78*
     
  10. OP
    OP
    z

    zyntec724 Valued Member Member

    I liquid cool computers so I know the process, but in that matter you have no control over temperatures, and with that volume of water you would need a pretty good sized radiator. I think I may have seen a used chiller in the LFS, if I remember correctly it wasn't cheap

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    Fans I can do, normally the water temps isn't an issue, normally around 79 to 80 in the summer accept for the extra warm days like today. Then once winter comes the heater will be on blast. Last year we had a day 40 below, wasn't fun.

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 20, 2015
  11. E

    Et tu Valued Member Member

    When it gets to 72* here, we get the the hoodies out of the closet! I am a desert rat!
     
  12. LiterallyHydro

    LiterallyHydro Well Known Member Member

    Chillers are pretty rarely needed in freshwater fish keeping. If the water is too warm, you can look into using a fan blowing across the surface of the water to help cool the tank.
     
  13. Dom90

    Dom90 Fishlore VIP Member

    Stupid question, what does the purpose of a chiller serve and how would it not apply to FW as in the OP's case?


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  14. LiterallyHydro

    LiterallyHydro Well Known Member Member

    the purpose of a chiller is essentially the opposite of a heater, meant to cool the tank to a certain temperature. And the reason it wouldn't serve as much of a purpose in this situation is because chillers are meant for cooling water that would otherwise get pretty hot.

    Saltwater tanks can get really hot under normal circumstances.. Metal halides produce a ton of heat, and the metal halides are somewhat often under canopies where there isn't much room for heat to escape.
     
  15. DanB80TTS

    DanB80TTS Well Known Member Member

    Granted the optimal temp for Rams is 80-82, but 85 is still in their range.
     
  16. Jsigmo

    Jsigmo Well Known Member Member

    The reason that using a fan to blow air across the surface of the water will chill the water is simple in concept, but rather complex in its details. But the point is, it works well.

    The increased air contact with the water causes a lot of water to evaporate. As water evaporates, it changes state from the liquid phase to the vapor phase. To do so, the individual water molecules must absorb a lot of heat (the latent heat of vaporization).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latent_heat

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enthalpy_of_vaporization

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evaporative_cooler


    Anyhow, this energy must come from somewhere, and it can cool the water in the aquarium to a temperature well below the ambient air temperature, particularly if the humidity in the room is low. The lower the humidity, the higher the rate of evaporation, and the better the cooling will be.

    So this is a cheap, simple way to cool an aquarium. But the room must have fairly low humidity, and you must be willing to replenish the water lost to evaporation by topping off more frequently (preferably with RO or distilled water) between water changes.

    A chiller, on the other hand, is an air conditioner for water. They can be quite expensive. There's no reason whatsoever that you couldn't use one for a fresh water aquarium. But they are expensive, so people normally don't bother with them for freshwater, but I have seen them used when people had fish that can't tolerate warm water.

    Keep in mind that the warmer the water, the less oxygen it can hold. This seems opposite to what you'd expect, but is true for many dissolved gasses in water. The colder the water, the more dissolved gas the water can hold. As you increase the temperature of the water, the fish have a harder time "breathing" because of the lower amount of dissolved oxygen in the water. So you might think about increasing the water circulation in your tank if it's getting "too hot". An air stone to create more water movement and contact with the surface isn't a bad idea, and is cheap and easy. It'll also help cool the water much the same way as a fan blowing over the surface will, and will work well in conjunction with a fan.

    Another thing to keep in mind is that you can open the windows in the room, and use a fan to suck air through the room from outside at night and early morning when it's cooler outside. Then shut the windows and turn off the fan after the sun comes up and the outside temperatures start to rise. This will keep the average temperature in the room lower, which the aquarium will respond to. It's also more comfortable for you!

    Another thought is that even though you say the room is too large for a window air conditioner to do much good, you could install one in the nearest window and try to set it to blow directly on or at the aquarium. And they make those so-called "portable" air conditioners that use a large hose run to a window to eject the waste heat from the room, and that might allow you to position the unit closer to the aquarium.

    A normal cheap room window AC unit will probably cost a lot less than a dedicated aquarium chiller.

    However, I saw a post on this very forum where a guy used a Peltier module from one of those cheap, small, plug-into-the-car-cigarette-lighter-socket picnic coolers to directly cool the water in his aquarium. That's a pretty cheap way to achieve an actual chiller for your aquarium. It was a good project!
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2015
  17. OP
    OP
    z

    zyntec724 Valued Member Member

    The tanks are now both 80F as the temp is cooler. My fish are moving from a 10 to a 29, the 10 was near a window and now that they are out of that tank I will be able to open that window and put a fan in it, then a fan in the back window so I should get nice circulation to cool the house down

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