Fishes Are Rubbing On Each Other

123

Valued Member
Messages
239
Reaction score
94
Points
38
Experience
Just started
Hello I have in last week noticed that my honey gouramis (female and one with unidentified gender) are rubbing on each other occasionally. I mean, the female was spawning before with other male, and it does not look like it. They just rub on each other sideways. I also noticed they come down to gravel and kinda rub close to it with belly (I dont think they actually touch it) ... I thought they are just trying to stir the water to find some food ( they eat from gravel constantly). Sometimes they accelerate towards some plant and swim around it quickly like if trying to rub on it too. I though all this might just be some new aspect of their behavior. But today I seen two Medakas rubbing each other too, and also rubbing close to gravel.

I recently had a scare of parasites because one Medaka was pooping white and today one gourami did too. But it might well be they are pooping white garlic which I am feeding them more often these days (they really like it). Is rubbing an indication of anything I should watch out for or treat?

I should add that water parameters are all in place 0, 0, 5. But I did add new fishes and plants without quarantine recently (don't hate me for it, I will do better next time).
 

penguin02

Well Known Member
Messages
1,453
Reaction score
967
Points
118
Experience
2 years
Are there any noticible signs on their scales? Correct me if I’m wrong, but sometimes rubbing on objects is a sign of ick.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #4

123

Valued Member
Messages
239
Reaction score
94
Points
38
Experience
Just started
penguin02 said:
Are there any noticible signs on their scales? Correct me if I’m wrong, but sometimes rubbing on objects is a sign of ick.
I’ve been watching them very closely. There is nothing on anyone’s scales. I was afraid whether they are not scratching their bellies on the gravel, but not even signs of that (that’s why I don’t think they are actually rubbing on the gravel, just very close). It is just suspicious that both species started doing it now after I gave them bigger tank, more plants and tetras. But maybe they are just happy to have more space in bigger tank and more plants and new buddies. I’m definitely watching them close though.
 

DaleM

Well Known Member
Messages
808
Reaction score
390
Points
98
Experience
Just started
Katarina said:
I’ve been watching them very closely. There is nothing on anyone’s scales. I was afraid whether they are not scratching their bellies on the gravel, but not even signs of that (that’s why I don’t think they are actually rubbing on the gravel, just very close). It is just suspicious that both species started doing it now after I gave them bigger tank, more plants and tetras. But maybe they are just happy to have more space in bigger tank and more plants and new buddies. I’m definitely watching them close though.
Definitely keep a very close eye on them, especially around their gills, fins and their scales. It's called flashing (scratching themselves) and can be a sign of parasites (usually external parasites) or something in the water which is irritating them. If they continue, try a water change and see if they continue to do it. Also make sure ammonia and nitrite are in check
 

GuppyDazzle

Well Known Member
Messages
1,051
Reaction score
936
Points
148
Experience
More than 10 years
I could be ich or another external parasite. Ich, for example, is present before you can see it. If it is parasites, you should see visible signs soon. I'd get treatment ready so you can act fast if you have to.
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom