Fish ID

CaelB
Member
I love in China, so scientific names (it any kind of English names) aren't always available. It was called something along the lines of a "pond algae (water plant, actually) eater." At first, I was planning on having a very simple tank with just a couple fish and some common river shrimp. Turns out the fish have a liking of shrimp meat, so I'm left with just a couple fish. Any help with figuring out just what I have would be great.
 
Redshark1
Member
This may be a Bitterling.
 
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CaelB
Member
Amazing, never heard of bitterlings before, but I looked them up and the body shape is dead on, I found a couple pictures of fish with very similar colorations, thanks a ton!
 
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CaelB
Member
Dead ringer
 
Redshark1
Member
CaelB I'm glad my limited knowledge helped you out!
 
jake37
Member
Interesting looks to be specifically a:
BLUE AMUR TAIWANESE BITTERLING

Blue Amur Taiwan Bitterling (Paracheilognathus himantegus) - Aquatic Arts
 
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CaelB
Member
jake37 said:
Interesting looks to be specifically a:
BLUE AMUR TAIWANESE BITTERLING

Blue Amur Taiwan Bitterling (Paracheilognathus himantegus) - Aquatic Arts
I saw that one as well, I noticed that its tail fin sees the black stripe run all the way to the end, whereas mine changes from black to red at the tail fin.

Do you guys think it's more likely a different species or just a little differentiation on the same species?

I searched up the species name for the picture I posted, and all other sources of that name seem to have pictures of fish that are very different from the site I posted...
 
jake37
Member
No clue never heard of the fish before but i did observe there were a *lot* of different species with slightly different amounts of red.
 
chromedome52
Member
Different species. I think you had it right with the first one you posted. Bitterlings are fascinating because they lay their eggs inside the breathing tubes of mussels. The female gets a very long ovipositor, and has to delicately slide this down the tubes of the mussels. Males just spray milt in front of the intake tube, and the eggs are fertilized inside the mussel!
 
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CaelB
Member
I've just spent the last hour reading about this exactly, I'm now looking into the feasibility of raising mussels in a freshwater aquarium! Equally interesting is that the mussel in turn elects larvae that attach to the bitterling's gills; they're both parasites of each other! Neat stuff.
 

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