Fish for college?

  1. F

    FinalBlue New Member Member

    So I'll be leaving to college this fall and I've always had pets so being without one would be really weird. But the school does allow me to own a fish but the tank cannot exceed 5 gallons. I've had crown tail betas in the past but I haven't had one in years so I'm rusty on my fish knowledge. I was wondering if I could get advice on if it's a good idea or not. I have no roommate so I won't have to ask if they're okay with it so yay good start! I'm not planning on getting one the second I move in I plan on running to the pet store and getting my supplies then setting them up then leaving my tank for a week or so to stabilize before I add a fish. I'd adore a goldfish I had one and he was my favorite fish so if there is a possibility for one please let me know, I don't think there is with how much space they need but I'm curious. I'd like to know if they're is any other fish possibilities besides betas.
     
  2. Viriam Karo

    Viriam Karo Well Known Member Member

    Nope, definitely can't do a goldfish with 5 gallons but you could do a betta. A betta would be quite content in a 5 gallon tank.

    If you're interested, you could do shrimp instead. I have a 5 gallon tank with Red Cherry Shrimp and they're really fun to watch.

    Remember that running your tank for a week to "stabilize" it isn't actually cycling (see the nitrogen cycle). In order to do a true cycle, it will take anywhere from 4-8 weeks unless you use something like Tetra SafeStart, in which case you will be cycled in about 2 weeks. I highly recommend TSS, but if you intend to go that route you should read https://www.fishlore.com/fishforum/aquarium-nitrogen-cycle/58116-q-tetra-tetra-safestart.html
     
  3. OP
    OP
    F

    FinalBlue New Member Member

    I never even thought of shrimp those could be fun! and thank you for the link on tetra SafeStart like I said I'm rusty in my fish housing so I just remember setting up my tank and leaving it for a week although I'm guessing I added a conditioner or something to the water.
     


  4. r

    renthus Well Known Member Member

    Lol. My school technically has a rule of "No more than 1 fish in a tank not to exceed 10 gallons." I've got a fully stocked 20g, 2 5.5s (plus a third as QT), a 12g, 2 10s, and an empty 40g betta grow-out tank (not to mention the male betta grow-out things). See if you can find out if it's *actually* a rule, as in whether anyone is really going to take issue.

    If you do want to stick to a 5g, here's the full comprehensive list of potential 5g inhabitants (to my knowledge):

    - Snails
    - Betta
    - African Dwarf Frog x2
    - Bumblebee Goby x2 (note: these are like... sorta brackish)
    - Dwarf Puffer
    - Shrimp
    - I've heard 2 guppies, but I wouldn't do that
     
  5. OP
    OP
    F

    FinalBlue New Member Member

    I just did some snooping into a different rule book than I was given and it said I can have an aquarium up to 15 gallons! So I guess I might as well have the extra 5 gallons added to that and get myself a goldfish. I don't think anyone will be taking measurements of my fish tank anyway.
     
  6. hollie1505

    hollie1505 Well Known Member Member

    Hello :) Welcome to Fishlore!

    Fancy Goldfish require 20G for the first fish, 10G thereafter and commons/comets require large ponds.

    You could keep one fancy goldfish in there but I wouldn't recommend it. You would need to perform at least 3x50% water changes per week and have a filter that runs at least 150GPH, more GPH would be better if you plan on having a 15G.xx
     


  7. r

    renthus Well Known Member Member

    Yeah, I really wouldn't do a goldfish. I may be in the minority, but I really do believe that all goldfish (fancy or not) belong in ponds. You're going to be busy your freshman year, and you're just not going to have the time or inclination to keep up with the crazy water changes, among many other issues.
     
  8. Fashooga

    Fashooga Fishlore VIP Member

    Are you going to be in a dorm? The reason I ask is that you'll be hauling a lot of stuff to college, like clothes, computer, shoes and other crud. You will acquire other stuff while your there and thus room space becomes an issue. Plus do you want to break it down before school is out and have to haul it back home for 3 months and do it all over again?
     
  9. Bob Ellis

    Bob Ellis Valued Member Member

    Yeah consider how much work it will be to haul it all back out in nine months, where are the fish going to be over the summer, Christmas break, etc etc.


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  10. r

    renthus Well Known Member Member

    As someone who actually does move my fish back and forth to school something like 3 times a year (winter break, spring break, technically summer break but not really cuz I work on campus), keep in mind that it is very, very doable. It's just hard work 6 times per year, and you really do need a plan. At this point, I've more or less mastered the system of bagging all my fish, loading them in a cooler, and just relaxing on the train for 7 hours. I've got duplicate barebones tanks at home, so I just get by with short-term filters (using the main media), desk lamps, etc.

    Oh and keep in mind, I do that with 6 tanks, most of which are betta tanks, and one of which is a heavily stocked 20g, so yeah, if you're just doing a betta or something like that, it'll be beyond trivial.

    EDIT: Oh and check that your roommate isn't allergic to fish or something equally ridiculous.
     
  11. k

    klj7678 Valued Member Member

    I've got a 2.5 gallon betta tank that I take back and forth to school. I remove enough water that it just barely covers my tallest decoration then I wedge the tank between something to hold it steady. I also cover the openings to prevent as much spillage as possible. Moving little tanks is no problem at all but I'm not willing to go bigger until I graduate. Good luck with whatever you decide :]
     
  12. sasha94

    sasha94 Valued Member Member

  13. G

    GuyCO Valued Member Member

    You can get 1 male guppy and 5 females. They would work.


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  14. hollie1505

    hollie1505 Well Known Member Member


    Not really, with five females the tank will quickly over run with fry. Stick with males if you go this route.xx