Fish all congregating at bottom of tank. What does this mean?

Discussion in 'Freshwater Fish Forums' started by rengadx17, Aug 13, 2015.

  1. rengadx17New MemberMember

    I have a 20 gallon long tank setup with 7 neon tetras and 6 orange von rio tetras. Today I noticed that they have become rather inactive, which is not normal behavior as up until today they have all been super active swimming all around the tank and exploring. Today, they're all just congregating at the bottom of the tank near the back and the orange von rios seem to be opening and closing their mouths, sort of like they're gasping for air.

    I was curious that the problem might have been something wrong with the aeration in the water, but I don't think that's an issue since I have a hang-on-the-back filter designed for tanks up to 50 gallons that's creating lots of surface agitation as well as a pretty strong air stone creating lots of bubbles and thus agitation on the opposite end of the tank from the filter.

    I then thought about testing the water parameters but everything seems perfectly fine (Ammonia - 0ppm, Nitrite - 0ppm, Nitrate - 5ppm, Ph - 7.5), temperature steady right at 79 degrees.

    Not really sure what the issue is or if it's even an issue at all. Does anyone have an insights or advice for me?

    Thanks!
     




  2. BornThisWayBettasFishlore VIPMember

  3. rengadx17New MemberMember

  4. BornThisWayBettasFishlore VIPMember

    Do they have clamped fins? I think the temp is a little warm for the neons, but that is debatable from what I've read.
     
  5. rengadx17New MemberMember

    Fins don't look clamped to me. I think 79 is the maximum recommended temp for neons, but of course different people and places will tell you different things.
     
  6. mikerox29Well Known MemberMember

    With the increased temperature of the water comes a reduction of oxygen content in the water. This is the only thing I can really think of
     
  7. rengadx17New MemberMember

    I just turned down my heater by about 2-3 degrees so we'll see if this helps at all
     
  8. SaturnValued MemberMember

    If it were a depletion in oxygen, the fish would be up at the top of the tank gasping for air rather than down at the bottom of the tank, so I don't think temperature/oxygen is the issue.

    When were this fish added to the tank? Is there anything that you've done to the tank that you don't normally do or? If you added the Tetra to the tank not too long ago, it's possible that they've settled down some. In my past experience, once my tetra (neon, pristella, lampeye) were settled into the tank, they were as active as they first were. That's just me though AND they were in tanks by themselves. When I had some sort of tetra in with a very active center piece fish, they were on the move a lot. Maybe try and feed them and see if they perk up some?
     
  9. rengadx17New MemberMember

    You all have great insights so thank you!

    I have had them in the tank for about 2 weeks now with no "problems" until today. I waited to add them until the tank became established and had completed its nitrogen cycle and to speed things along I added several decor items (rocks, plants, driftwood) from other established aquariums I have as well as filter media that had been "seasoning" in those other established tanks as well.

    I did try and feed them a small meal to see if that would perk them up and it seemed to do the job as they instantly became more active and began to swim around more. I'll continue to keep and eye on it though.
     
  10. chromedome52Fishlore VIPMember

    Did you do a recent water change? Sometimes the water supply is altered, and things are added.

    Incidentally, both these species should benefit from cooler temperatures, though the flammeus are more tolerant of a wider range. In the 1970s, the recognized range for Neons was 72-76. How it has moved upward is a mystery, but a falsehood that I have dedicated myself to fighting. They come from upland streams in Peru, and the temperatures in those waters are cooler. Can they survive 79 F? Sure; so can Goldfish, but is it appropriate to keep them there? (<---My new catch phrase!)
     
Loading...




  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice