First Water Readings

ValerieAdams

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Before putting anything into my tank, my pH was 7.2, Ammonia - 0, Nitrite - 0 & Nitrate - 5.0ppm. I assumed everything would be 0, I went ahead and added Dr. Tim’s Ammonium Chloride & Nitrifying Bacteria. Do I re test the water now or wait and do it again tomorrow? Is it normal to have nitrates at first? Is that an okay pH?
 

finnipper59

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ValerieAdams said:
Before putting anything into my tank, my pH was 7.2, Ammonia - 0, Nitrite - 0 & Nitrate - 5.0ppm. I assumed everything would be 0, I went ahead and added Dr. Tim’s Ammonium Chloride & Nitrifying Bacteria. Do I re test the water now or wait and do it again tomorrow? Is it normal to have nitrates at first? Is that an okay pH?
Yes. The pH for most community tants is 6.8 and 7.2. Until you get fish in th tank, those nitrifying bacteria needto be kept fed. Test the system by adding enough ammonia to bring it up to 2 to 3 ppm and check the water tomorrow. If all ammonia and nitrites have been changed to mitrates only, you fish will be able to be added slowly after a partial water change to bring the nitrates down.
 
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ValerieAdams

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finnipper59 said:
Yes. The pH for most community tants is 6.8 and 7.2. Until you get fish in th tank, those nitrifying bacteria needto be kept fed. Test the system by adding enough ammonia to bring it up to 2 to 3 ppm and check the water tomorrow. If all ammonia and nitrites have been changed to mitrates only, you fish will be able to be added slowly after a partial water change to bring the nitrates down.
What should the nitrates be to add fish?
 

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Oh, I forgot you added ammonium chloride. Just check the perameters tomorrow. Mo ot noy normal to jave nitrates 1st.
finnipper59 said:
Yes. The pH for most community tants is 6.8 and 7.2. Until you get fish in th tank, those nitrifying bacteria needto be kept fed. Test the system by adding enough ammonia to bring it up to 2 to 3 ppm and check the water tomorrow. If all ammonia and nitrites have been changed to mitrates only, you fish will be able to be added slowly after a partial water change to bring the nitrates down.
 
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ValerieAdams

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Manytanks said:
A friend of mine uses rain water from a tank and it has nitrate readings also due to it not being treated with chlorine/chloramine
Is this good or bad or neither lol. I’m assuming I still need to do the cycling process?

finnipper59 said:
Oh, I forgot you added ammonium chloride. Just check the perameters tomorrow. Mo ot noy normal to jave nitrates 1st.
The nitrates were there before I added the ammonium & the bacteria
 

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Nitrates should alway be kept below 20 by doing partial water changes.
ValerieAdams said:
What should the nitrates be to add fish?
Nitrate is not affected by chlorine or chloramine treatment. If this friend of yours has been collecting the rain water from a rooftop downspout, it will have nitrates because of the organic materials that wash off of a roof including organic dust, pollen, any dead bugs, and of course bird poop. I hope your friend has some other way of collecting it.
ValerieAdams said:
Is this good or bad or neither lol. I’m assuming I still need to do the cycling process?
 
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ValerieAdams

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finnipper59 said:
Nitrate is not affected by chlorine or chloramine treatment. If this friend of yours has been collecting the rain water from a rooftop downspout, it will have nitrates because of the organic materials that wash off of a roof including organic dust, pollen, any dead bugs, and of course bird poop. I hope your friend has some other way of collecting it.
My water is from my sink. Why would I have nitrates before adding anything to the tank?
 

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ValerieAdams said:
My water is from my sink. Why would I have nitrates before adding anything to the tank?
Water companies have extremely large round open air pools with one large stirrer that rotares at the surface of the pools that keep the surface of the water moving slowly. It puts the water through the same biological cycle as we have in our fish tanks to change organic matter. Once this has been done, the 2nd step is to put the water through mechanical filters to make the water nice and clear from even tiniest particles. The third and final step includes adding chlorine and chloramine to kill off any bacteria or other pathogens in the water while adding various minerals needed to adjust the pH. Through this process, some nitrates slip through in acceptable levels. More nitrates can leach through small holes and cracks in old underground piping along with iron and small amounts of lead.
 
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ValerieAdams

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Okay so now my pH is 7.6, ammonia is 8 ppm, nitrites are 0 ppm, & nitrates are still 5 ppm. Should I add more ammonia or just the bacteria?
 

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finnipper59 said:
Nitrate is not affected by chlorine or chloramine treatment.
In my understanding it is bacteria that converts the ammonia to nitrite then to nitrate. chlorine/chloramine is added to water sources to kill bacteria so if chlorine/chloramine is in the water source it would kill the bacteria therefore stopping the ammonia present in a lot of water sources from being converted to nitrite and then to nitrate. Which leads me to believe that nitrate is directly affected by chlorine/chloramine.

Someone please correct me if I'm wrong
 
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