Finding Breeders/HM care

Eskielvr

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HI guys, I checked out the International Betta Society and got really interested, only to find out that the nearest club is 3 hours away in Indianapolis. I did find some contact information from someone in Ohio, though, but I'm not sure if they're a breeder or just a member of the club.

Anyway, I looked on Aquabid and some of those Bettas are just outstanding. I really like the Halfmoons, and from all the colors I've seen so far, I really like the White Platinum and the really deep reds and blues. I'm really wanting another tank now!!!

If I were to get another tank, is there anything special I'd need to do after it cycles? I read on the IBS's website that Halfmoons need a lot more care and maintenance than say, my Veiltail.

I think showing Bettas would be fun, but not if I have to travel so far. What's the difference between the ones listed for sale as Show quality versus the others? Some of the colors I've seen are a bit too outrageous for me.

I'm really getting bit by the betta bug now, but the only available tank I have is my 20 gallon, and I'd have to get a female if I got another. I don't think you can really put females in community tanks can you?

Man, I really wish I had more room. I'd really love to give breeding and showing Bettas a try. I suppose there are no local breeders near me who would be willing to work with me would there?
 

gammerus

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you don't have room for a hex? they take up very little room ;D
 

leafgirl115

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You never know. I found a breeder by me just my chance. Sine then I have forun 2 more Just keep looking. Hm bettas need the same care as VT. But breeding them takes the same HM just need a lot of cleen water. Have you looked into breeding them? If not you need to as it takes a lot of work.
 
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Eskielvr

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I've heard it can take a lot of work. I'd need more tanks first, or at least a bigger one. I *might* be able to squeeze in another small one, but no bigger than a 5 gallon. I'd rather have a 10 gallon or so. I'd like to breed, but I wouldn't know what to do with the fry when they get big. It'd probably have a hard time selling them.
 

chickadee

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It is not just the tanks for the betta parents but the growth tanks for the females and males fry. Here is the approximate listing.

Male tank for breeding and care of the fry to start with (about 10 gallon)

Female tank for recuperation afrer breeding (she will need to be alone so not a community tank)

Male tank for recuperation away from fry when they get big enough to eat or he will eat them (alone again or he will get upset)

55 gallon tank for females to grow up in when they outgrow the birth tank (there can be up to 100 of them)

about 100 of the separate individual jars for the males to be seperated into when they are old enough to be sexed so they do not kill each other or the females.

Each and every one of the containers (tanks and jars has to have 50% water changes EVERY day without fail or the fins and bodies will be malfomed and stunted). This is a lot of work and takes a lot of work. If you are not up for it and cannot devote the time or cannot spend the time to be with your breeding pair the whole time they are breeding (and it can take hours) you can lose one or both of them. Experienced breeders have lost expensive fish this way and they have a staff of people who watch their fish 24 hours a day.

Rose
 
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Eskielvr

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I don't agree with the idea about seperating the male from the fry. I was on the International Betta Society's website and from there, found an link/article about this guy who read about someone else who advised leaving the male in with the fry. So, he tried this method and said the male was in a better condition, he didn't get depressed looking after being seperated, and the only fry that were eaten were the weakened ones. The other fry, if he ate them he spit them back out. Also, the fry were in much better condition and bigger than ones of the same age who had the male taken out.

So, based on those findings, I don't agree with seperating the male, and if I ever get to the point where I breed, I'm doing the same. I'd rather have healthy, strong fish, than a whole bunch of puny ones, esp if the males get stressed out and depressed acting afterwards.
 

leafgirl115

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I would not recommend this to you if its your first time. All males will not do that. Some eat the eggs and another male has to take care of the fry. Only a few will even beable to do that.
 

chickadee

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You do not separate them right away but when they fall from the eggs and start to live on their own or they will eat the fry at this stage.

Rose
 

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