Filter?

jkkgron2

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Dillan Murphy said:
does a betta need a filter its in a 10 gallon tank
Yes!! All fish should have a filter, it helps keep all the beneficial bacteria needed for a successful cycle and also helps keep the water moving. Plus, it stirs up waste so you don’t have to try and remove a lot of it at the bottom.
 

Flyfisha

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No Dillian Murphy if you can change 50% of the water and pick up the poop every day including Xmas and your birthday. If you are not able to do this then a filter with the help of bacteria will turn any container into a true aquarium.
 

Flyfisha

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Some may think I am joking Dillan Murphy . But I am very serious. This is a feeding video, but water changes are done in much the same way with an overflow of water onto the ground.
These fish are raised by a team of people working 24/7 , it’s to much work for one person in my opinion?
 

jkkgron2

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Yeah.. if you do water changes daily and siphon out waste every day you wouldn’t need a filter. but, it’s a lot easier to just go get a filter. Flyfisha that video is pretty cool!
 

Gh05t

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You don't have to have a filter and you don't have to do daily WCs...*if* you heavily plant the aquarium and have only the betta in there. I would say a 1x per week WC of 50% would be sufficient. The plants would utilize the waste as nutrients and you would reset the balance each week with a big WC and it would continue. Do research on planted bowls as this is basically what you would be doing; many people run them successfully for the long term using this method.
 

jkkgron2

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Gh05t said:
You don't have to have a filter and you don't have to do daily WCs...*if* you heavily plant the aquarium and have only the betta in there. I would say a 1x per week WC of 50% would be sufficient. The plants would utilize the waste as nutrients and you would reset the balance each week with a big WC and it would continue. Do research on planted bowls as this is basically what you would be doing; many people run them successfully for the long term using this method.
Atleast 3x a week would be needed if they don’t get a filter. Filters aren’t used just to stir up waste. They also help oxygenate the water and hold a lot of the beneficial bacteria to help with the nitrogen cycle.
 

jake37

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I don't know the answer to this question. The simple answer would be yes but my understanding is betta can breath air directly so i'm not sure ammonia/nitrite are an issue - mind you i'm not claiming they are not an issue - i simply don't know. Of course overtime the water will get dirty and that might be a bit unhealthy for the fish and then you will need to clean it. I can't answer if 'time' is hourly, daily or weekly.
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If ammonia/nitrite are an issue for the betta than you can always use a sponge filter as a 'cheap' biological filter. And as mentioned above a heavy dosing of plants might keep the nitrate in check.
 

Gh05t

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jkkgron2 said:
Atleast 3x a week would be needed if they don’t get a filter. Filters aren’t used just to stir up waste. They also help oxygenate the water and hold a lot of the beneficial bacteria to help with the nitrogen cycle.
The key to this is heavily planted...plants during daytime hours consume waste products and produce oxygen. This also creates somewhat of a "circulation" in the aquarium the exchange of gasses etc which is why planted bowls do not go stagnant as many claim. Bacteria also inhabits every surface of the aquarium not just filter media. Most marine aquariums for example do not have filtration in the traditional sense they rely on the volume of porous rock to filter the water...essentially the tank itself is the filter. Planted bowls are an old concept...and really not difficult they thrive without much upkeep and this is due to a low bioload from livestock and plants.
 

jkkgron2

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Gh05t said:
The key to this is heavily planted...plants during daytime hours consume waste products and produce oxygen. This also creates somewhat of a "circulation" in the aquarium the exchange of gasses etc which is why planted bowls do not go stagnant as many claim. Bacteria also inhabits every surface of the aquarium not just filter media. Most marine aquariums for example do not have filtration in the traditional sense they rely on the volume of porous rock to filter the water...essentially the tank itself is the filter. Planted bowls are an old concept...and really not difficult they thrive without much upkeep and this is due to a low bioload from livestock and plants.
I actually did try this once with a betta in a very heavily planted tank. About a month before I did this his fin rot stopped. A few weeks After I started, he got it again. After I added a filter it went away and I’ve seen an improvement in his coloring. Also I’m still cleaning up all the debris that formed during that time. And no, I did not overfeed. That debris just kept building up because there was no filter to stir it up.
 

Gh05t

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jkkgron2 said:
I actually did try this once with a betta in a very heavily planted tank. About a month before I did this his fin rot stopped. A few weeks After I started, he got it again. After I added a filter it went away and I’ve seen an improvement in his coloring. Also I’m still cleaning up all the debris that formed during that time. And no, I did not overfeed. That debris just kept building up because there was no filter to stir it up.
Ive done this sort of bowls many times over the years particularly with very heavy finned bettas that really appreciate having no current to deal with. That is interesting you had so much difficulty...aquariums of course have numerous variables including specific gallons, substrate, type of plants used, and water source. Most people's tap water is "dirty" in which it has a very high TDS and nitrate level to begin with...my water source thanks to a filtration system has near 0 nitrates and a low TDS value. I am all for filtration...none of my tanks have less than 2-3 filters per system; but the fact is many people do successfully keep these bowls for many years with nothing so it is very inaccurate to suggest that it is "mandatory". Were you feeding daily? Did you allow the plants to establish themselves for around 1 month prior to stocking while monitoring levels? What substrate and ferts did you use?

I usually use 10-15G tanks for a betta bowl; always used clay based substrate of some sort...have used plain cat litter back in the day and later fluorite/eco depending. Plants were a low light mix of random things usually wisteria, hornwort, floating species, anubias, java fern and crypts...Id typically plant the tank dose ferts on it for a few weeks and leave it alone. Only doing water top offs for several weeks/months. Once the tank was to my desired jungle level I would do a very large water change, dose ferts again and add whatever life form which got the tank. Typically either inverts or a betta. I fed the livestock lightly every other day...dosed ferts however often was needed and did a weekly larger water change vacuuming any debris and that was that...never any issues. When I owned a house with a deck I did similar setups on my deck in the summer with large tubs...no filtration on them just heavily planted. Typically used endlers or cherry shrimp...on these the water changes were much less frequent as I tended to let nature take care of things. Always brought in more livestock than I started with and months under the natural sun truly made them glow.
 

jkkgron2

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Gh05t said:
Ive done this sort of bowls many times over the years particularly with very heavy finned bettas that really appreciate having no current to deal with. That is interesting you had so much difficulty...aquariums of course have numerous variables including specific gallons, substrate, type of plants used, and water source. Most people's tap water is "dirty" in which it has a very high TDS and nitrate level to begin with...my water source thanks to a filtration system has near 0 nitrates and a low TDS value. I am all for filtration...none of my tanks have less than 2-3 filters per system; but the fact is many people do successfully keep these bowls for many years with nothing so it is very inaccurate to suggest that it is "mandatory". Were you feeding daily? Did you allow the plants to establish themselves for around 1 month prior to stocking while monitoring levels? What substrate and ferts did you use?

I usually use 10-15G tanks for a betta bowl; always used clay based substrate of some sort...have used plain cat litter back in the day and later fluorite/eco depending. Plants were a low light mix of random things usually wisteria, hornwort, floating species, anubias, java fern and crypts...Id typically plant the tank dose ferts on it for a few weeks and leave it alone. Only doing water top offs for several weeks/months. Once the tank was to my desired jungle level I would do a very large water change, dose ferts again and add whatever life form which got the tank. Typically either inverts or a betta. I fed the livestock lightly every other day...dosed ferts however often was needed and did a weekly larger water change vacuuming any debris and that was that...never any issues. When I owned a house with a deck I did similar setups on my deck in the summer with large tubs...no filtration on them just heavily planted. Typically used endlers or cherry shrimp...on these the water changes were much less frequent as I tended to let nature take care of things. Always brought in more livestock than I started with and months under the natural sun truly made them glow.
The water source probably makes a difference. I do understand that some people have done it successfully, I’m just pointing out my experiences :).

I had already had my betta before I added plants and the reason I added them was actually to help with his fin rot. In an established tank I could see it (No filter) working great, but I’m definitely going to have filtration when the plants are melting. I’m guessing Most of the debris came from the plants. There are definitely many factors that could be causing him fin rot. Old age, for example, couldve been the issue. I just noticed improvement around the time when I added the filter but I don’t know for certain that the filter was what did it.


If I were to remove the filter now I bet I would see different results. Now that it’s more established with less plants melting he might not get it again.
 

Gh05t

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Fin rot in itself is a pain to deal with as specific causes are so wide...anything from temperature, poor water quality, diet, and stress can be a factor. Glad your fish has recovered and is doing well and certainly everyone's experiences are valid particularly in this hobby. There really are no right and wrong methods; typically the success of any aquarium is contingent on a multitude of factors some within and some out of direct control.
 

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