Filter Question.

Discussion in 'Filters and Filtration' started by 2lit_2quit, Aug 6, 2017.

  1. 2lit_2quit

    2lit_2quit New Member Member

    So I have a 20 g with 2 mollies, 1 pleco, 2 ghost catfish, 2 platy, 1 tetra, 2 guppies, and a swordtail. Most of my fish before, died and had ich. I just got these fish today and did a 50% water change before putting them in. Should I change the sponge filter because my ammonia reading was in stress readings? Or would that cause more harm?
     
  2. TwoHedWlf

    TwoHedWlf Well Known Member Member

    Changing your sponge filter is the last thing you want to do if your tank is uncycled.
     
  3. el337

    el337 Fishlore Legend Member

    No, don't change your sponge filter as that would house any beneficial bacteria remaining. How long ago did this tank last have fish in it? Depending on the amount of time, the BB may have already died off.

    Also, sounds like you are very overstocked for a 20g and if you added all those fish today, you are going to have a hard time cycling this tank and keeping water parameters under control. I suggest taking some fish back - the mollies, swordtail and pleco (depending on the variety) are not appropriate for this tank size.
     
  4. AllieSten

    AllieSten Fishlore VIP Member

    Is your tank cycled?
     
  5. el337

    el337 Fishlore Legend Member

    I'm guessing it's not because her ammonia was in "stress readings".

    Actual numbers for ammonia, nitrite and nitrate would help though I'm guessing OP is using test strips?
     
  6. OP
    OP
    2lit_2quit

    2lit_2quit New Member Member

    6d568002e8fd18825ef36cdb265f5401.jpg

    I don't have a test kit but I got these things. Just got them today because of our ammonia reading.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    2lit_2quit

    2lit_2quit New Member Member

    6d568002e8fd18825ef36cdb265f5401.jpg

    I don't have a test kit but I got these things. Just got them today because of our ammonia reading.
     
  8. el337

    el337 Fishlore Legend Member

    Those aren't good indicators to determine your water parameters. I suggest getting an API Master Test Kit.
     
  9. p

    purslanegarden Well Known Member Member

    You don't need to replace the sponge part of the sponge filter, but you do need to clean it occasionally in old tank water (when you do a water change, use that water to clean the sponge).

    If your readings are still not in normal range, then it's possible your sponge filter isn't able to keep up with the bioload. Either get a larger sponge filter or add additional filtration from other filters (including another sponge filter).

    Having the ich previously, it also could mean your water maintenance wasn't as good as it could have been, or you are overfeeding and causing a bad environment (which is where the sponge filter may have also had trouble keeping up with).
     
  10. tocandesu

    tocandesu Well Known Member Member

    What you can do to reduce ammonia is to water changes.
     




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