Filter help

InTheBox

Member
Sorry for asking another question, but I've been researching about filters for my 36 gal, and currently I have a Aqueon filter cartridge one, and people have been saying that they are really bad and kill your fish, but some people say they're ok, and if they're not, should I get a sponge filter? and which one?
 

86 ssinit

Member
Ok if your saying change the cartridges for a sponge yes that a great move. Get a sponge from your pet store and cut it to fit. Take the poly fill (white stuff on the outside of cartridge) and push that in front of your new sponge. Turn on the filter and your good to go. Leave that poly in the filter for a month. Weekly when your doing your 50% water changes. Rinse and squeeze out the new sponge in the wc water. That new sponge will last years.
Now if your saying you want to get rid of the aqueron filter replace it with a tidal 75. It comes with sponge and media and is a much better filter.
 
  • Thread Starter

InTheBox

Member
86 ssinit said:
Ok if your saying change the cartridges for a sponge yes that a great move. Get a sponge from your pet store and cut it to fit. Take the poly fill (white stuff on the outside of cartridge) and push that in front of your new sponge. Turn on the filter and your good to go. Leave that poly in the filter for a month. Weekly when your doing your 50% water changes. Rinse and squeeze out the new sponge in the wc water. That new sponge will last years.
Now if your saying you want to get rid of the aqueron filter replace it with a tidal 75. It comes with sponge and media and is a much better filter.
Okay cool! So if I wanna keep my filter and go with the first option, is this filter ok to add a sponge? and where would you add the sponge?
 

86 ssinit

Member
Ok I’m not an aqueron user. What aqueron says is everything that is blue is collecting your good bacteria. But if it was my filter I would remove the whole blue basket. The white cartridge I would rip the poly(white stuff) off and than put a sponge where the blue basket was and stuff the poly in front. Again I don’t care for those filters. Just not enough media space for me. What I’ve written will work but I would save up for the tidal. Another much cheaper filter(but bigger) is the marineland 350. This filter online from petsmart is around $30. The stores will accept the online price. This filter does accept many different media’s. But you will also need to add sponges instead of its cartridges.
 

AquaFranklin

Member
First off, filters don't kill fish. Improper cleaning of filters kill fish. When they say the "filter" killed the fish its because if you follow the directions for the filter and replace a new cartridge and throw out the old, then you will throw out most of your BB, cycle your tank again, and subsequently "kill your fish".

Secondly, a filter is only as good a the gallons per hour it runs. You should always be 10% to 20% more GPH than your tank size. More is better IMO but that is debatable. Too much can cause too much current in your tank.

Third, Filter media can and should always be customized and upgraded. Here's a popular opinion. Take the cartridge and throw it out, never buy another one again and put in your own media. NOW wait a second. If the cartridge is all you have then follow the advice of 86 ssinit.

Any fragrance free, chemical free, sponge will work. Poly fill is great for cleaning a tank of small particles however pan scrubbers, scotch pads, work too for just breeding BB and removing large debris (which is the basis for a filter).
 

BiologicalNerd

Member
InTheBox said:
Sorry for asking another question, but I've been researching about filters for my 36 gal, and currently I have a Aqueon filter cartridge one, and people have been saying that they are really bad and kill your fish, but some people say they're ok, and if they're not, should I get a sponge filter? and which one?
I completely agree with what everybody has said thus far. Like you, the tank I purchased came with a HOB filter that needed cartridges. These are always at you big box LPS. However, despite the filter being good, it will generate currents that are a definite no-go for smaller fish. I purchased an air pump, and I recommend that you do as well. At a big box store, they tend to be very cheap. I got a 60 gallon air pump for only $18! Once you purchase this, I recommend you go on amazon and buy a sponge filter kit which comes with tubing and no-return tubes. These will be around 6-10$.... At the end of the day you would be paying 30ish dollars for something that will last you a year or two.
 
  • Thread Starter

InTheBox

Member
BiologicalNerd said:
I completely agree with what everybody has said thus far. Like you, the tank I purchased came with a HOB filter that needed cartridges. These are always at you big box LPS. However, despite the filter being good, it will generate currents that are a definite no-go for smaller fish. I purchased an air pump, and I recommend that you do as well. At a big box store, they tend to be very cheap. I got a 60 gallon air pump for only $18! Once you purchase this, I recommend you go on amazon and buy a sponge filter kit which comes with tubing and no-return tubes. These will be around 6-10$.... At the end of the day you would be paying 30ish dollars for something that will last you a year or two.
I was researching sponge filters but they said you shouldn't just use that filter, which one do you have?
 

BiologicalNerd

Member

86 ssinit

Member
AquaFranklin said:
First off, filters don't kill fish. Improper cleaning of filters kill fish. When they say the "filter" killed the fish its because if you follow the directions for the filter and replace a new cartridge and throw out the old, then you will throw out most of your BB, cycle your tank again, and subsequently "kill your fish".

Secondly, a filter is only as good a the gallons per minute it runs. You should always be 10% to 20% more GPM than your tank size. More is better IMO but that is debatable. Too much can cause too much current in your tank.

Third, Filter media can and should always be customized and upgraded. Here's a popular opinion. Take the cartridge and throw it out, never buy another one again and put in your own media. NOW wait a second. If the cartridge is all you have then follow the advice of 86 ssinit.

Any fragrance free, chemical free, sponge will work. Poly fill is great for cleaning a tank of small particles however pan scrubbers, scotch pads, work too for just breeding BB and removing large debris (which is the basis for a filter).
You are right. But with the ops filter the company claims that the majority of the bb is growing on anything blue. So the basket and that blue thing in front. So it’s easy for someone to just throw away the white cartridge and add another. To me even there info is bad. But yes bb will grow on the blue stuff but more will grow on the poly because it’s got more area for bb to grow. Because it’s the first thing the water hits more will also grow there. It’s like plastic scrubby will hold bb but a sponge will hold much more. Scrubbies are good in wet /drys or canisters but not that good in hobs.
Oh and it’s gallons per hour .
 

AquaFranklin

Member
InTheBox said:
I was researching sponge filters but they said you shouldn't just use that filter, which one do you have?
Hang on back (HOB) filters are the best for your case. Sponge filters are good for temporary tanks or really small ones.
You can use your Aqueon. I have one and have no problems just make sure the GPH is rated for your tank.
 

BiologicalNerd

Member
86 ssinit said:
You are right. But with the ops filter the company claims that the majority of the bb is growing on anything blue. So the basket and that blue thing in front. So it’s easy for someone to just throw away the white cartridge and add another. To me even there info is bad. But yes bb will grow on the blue stuff but more will grow on the poly because it’s got more area for bb to grow. Because it’s the first thing the water hits more will also grow there. It’s like plastic scrubby will hold bb but a sponge will hold much more. Scrubbies are good in wet /drys or canisters but not that good in hobs.
Oh and it’s gallons per hour .
Also, to add on to what 86 ssint said, when looking for a sponge, make sure to get one which is course so that there is more surface area for BB to colonize so that you can potentially have more. Also when cleaning them make sure that you ONLY take a container of TANK WATER, and swish around the sponge in there. That’s it, if you use tap water or anything else you could kill off the BB
 
  • Thread Starter

InTheBox

Member
AquaFranklin said:
Hang on back (HOB) filters are the best for your case. Sponge filters are good for temporary tanks or really small ones.
You can use your Aqueon. I have one and have no problems just make sure the GPM is rated for your tank.
Yeah I have a 36 gal tank so that's not really small, so the HOB might be the way to go, but I need to make sure it has a sponge and the bio media in it right?
 

BiologicalNerd

Member
InTheBox said:
Yeah I have a 36 gal tank so that's not really small, so the HOB might be the way to go, but I need to make sure it has a sponge and the bio media in it right?
Absolutely, the disposable filters are both a waste of money and can make your ecosystem susceptible to crashing. Make sure you buy an aquarium safe sponge and measure out your cartridge before you throw it out. It’s a fun little DIY you can do to save money and make your tank a little more stable. Best of luck!
 

86 ssinit

Member
The tidal is the best way to go. It comes with every thing you need. Only thing I would add is a layer of polyfill between the sponge and media
 

AquaFranklin

Member
86 ssinit said:
The tidal is the best way to go. It comes with every thing you need. Only thing I would add is a layer of polyfill between the sponge and media
But an Aqua Clear is cheaper, reliable and a large media section.

BTW this is coming from a guy who bought and Tidal 55 in 2016 and hasn't used anything else since LOL.
 

86 ssinit

Member
Aquaclear’s are great! But they won’t restart after a power outage. Tidal’s do as does the marineland so to me that makes them better
 
  • Thread Starter

InTheBox

Member
86 ssinit said:
The tidal is the best way to go. It comes with every thing you need. Only thing I would add is a layer of polyfill between the sponge and media
yeah, I'll prolly buy the Tidal 55, but should I buy it off amazon? or get it a a pet store?
 

AquaFranklin

Member
InTheBox said:
yeah, I'll prolly buy the Tidal 55, but should I buy it off amazon? or get it a a pet store?
Wherever is cheaper but there is a moral obligation fish keepers have to support their Local Fish Stores.
 

86 ssinit

Member
Amazon or eBay. Pet stores will rob you. I would also get the 75 not the 55. Bigger is always better.
 
  • Thread Starter

InTheBox

Member
86 ssinit said:
Amazon or eBay. Pet stores will rob you. I would also get the 75 not the 55. Bigger is always better.
Alright thanks everyone for the help!
 

Sanderguy777

Member
Ok, so the truth of the matter is that a sponge filter (the air powered ones) WILL grow BB and will keep the fish alive. They will NOT pick up much waste or debris in the tank, so you'll have to gravel vac more than with a HOB or other, mechanical filter. But you can run a 75g or a 150g on them just fine.

As to the HOBs. The "best" ones I know of are the aquaclears, and Tidals. They have a huge media area, and are reliable (though, the Aquaclear doesn't start reliably after turning off, or if power goes out. You'll have to clean the impeller and maybe push start it with a pencil (something my Marineland Penguin 350s NEVER need).

The Tidal and the new Marineland pro series have the pumps under the expected water line, so unless your tank is low, they shouldn't have any issues restarting.

The Marineland Penguin (old ones) have a rectangular intake which makes finding prefilters hard (sponges that keep small fish or shrimp, and large debris out of the main filter, as well as house BB). They also have a very thin, annoyingly shaped media basket. It is hard to get sponge in the shape it needs to be, and then it is a pain because it clogs faster. I have had 4 or 5 over the years because they only cost $25 or $30 each (compared to like $50 or $75 for aquaclears and tidals).

The biggest thing you need to do is keep the media in your existing filter. Whatever you do, I would keep the old filter running with as much of the old media as possible.
I used to keep the old media cartridges for my Penguin 350s for a month. They can hold 4 cartridges per filter, so I would take out 2 and rinse them off (with a garden hose, which I now realize was bad...), but then leave 2 running for the next time. The principal still applies though, since you can just rinse them in WC water.

The final decision is up to you. If you have a filter, and you can remodel it to fit your needs, there's no need to mess with a new one unless you want it. But if you do want a new one, then I would just run BOTH filters for about 3 weeks or a month so that the BB can colonize the new filter.
 
  • Thread Starter

InTheBox

Member
Sanderguy777 said:
Ok, so the truth of the matter is that a sponge filter (the air powered ones) WILL grow BB and will keep the fish alive. They will NOT pick up much waste or debris in the tank, so you'll have to gravel vac more than with a HOB or other, mechanical filter. But you can run a 75g or a 150g on them just fine.

As to the HOBs. The "best" ones I know of are the aquaclears, and Tidals. They have a huge media area, and are reliable (though, the Aquaclear doesn't start reliably after turning off, or if power goes out. You'll have to clean the impeller and maybe push start it with a pencil (something my Marineland Penguin 350s NEVER need).

The Tidal and the new Marineland pro series have the pumps under the expected water line, so unless your tank is low, they shouldn't have any issues restarting.

The Marineland Penguin (old ones) have a rectangular intake which makes finding prefilters hard (sponges that keep small fish or shrimp, and large debris out of the main filter, as well as house BB). They also have a very thin, annoyingly shaped media basket. It is hard to get sponge in the shape it needs to be, and then it is a pain because it clogs faster. I have had 4 or 5 over the years because they only cost $25 or $30 each (compared to like $50 or $75 for aquaclears and tidals).

The biggest thing you need to do is keep the media in your existing filter. Whatever you do, I would keep the old filter running with as much of the old media as possible.
I used to keep the old media cartridges for my Penguin 350s for a month. They can hold 4 cartridges per filter, so I would take out 2 and rinse them off (with a garden hose, which I now realize was bad...), but then leave 2 running for the next time. The principal still applies though, since you can just rinse them in WC water.

The final decision is up to you. If you have a filter, and you can remodel it to fit your needs, there's no need to mess with a new one unless you want it. But if you do want a new one, then I would just run BOTH filters for about 3 weeks or a month so that the BB can colonize the new filter.
I think I like the aqua clear one the best, the tidal is too expensive,

https://www.amazon.com/Aqua-Clear-Fish-Filter-Gallons/dp/B000260FUM

does this one seem legit to you?
 
  • Thread Starter

InTheBox

Member
Sanderguy777 said:
Looks good to me.
Don't get me wrong, they work great, I just wish the motor was designed a bit better and would auto restart. But that isn't really a huge deal.
for the aquaclear, do i need an air pump or anything? i don’t think so, but i can’t find the info on amazon.
 

Sanderguy777

Member
InTheBox said:
for the aquaclear, do i need an air pump or anything? i don’t think so, but i can’t find the info on amazon.
Nope.
They come with carbon, a sponge, and some bio balls or ceramic media. I would set it up with a sponge on bottom, ceramic stuff in the middle, and another sponge on top. That way, if you ever start another tank, you can take out one sponge and put it in a new filter.

Same can be done with the ceramic media, or even an air powered sponge filter.
 

RayClem

Member
Over my decades of fishkeeping I have used a lot of different HOB filters: Aquaclear, Tetra Whisper, Penn Plax Cascade, Marineland Penguin, and Aqueon. They all have their advantgages and disadvantages. I have not used Seachem Tidal or Fluval C filters, but they look like good filters as well.

One of the biggest recommendation I make with any filter is to use a sponge prefilter. That coarse sponge will catch a lot of debris before it ever gets to your filter. Clean the prefilter every week or two so you can clean your main filter media far less often.

Like many here, I do not like the disposable filter cartridges. For one thing, most of the contain activated carbon. Although activate carbon does have it uses such as removing used medications or eliminating tank odors, for most tanks carbon is unnecessary and in some cases it might be doing more harm than good. That is especially the case if you tank has live plants.

Thus, I use the cartridges as a template to cut either a filter sponge or filter pad to fit the filter. My current favorite filter pad is the Acurel Waste and Debris Reducing Filter Pad. With the Aqueon filter, if you are using sponges, remove the blue piece that holds the cartridges and cut the sponge to fit the entire filter body. However, if you use filter pads like I do, the blue piece is ideal for holding the filter pads in place.

Whether you are using filter sponges or filter pads, only replace the filter media when it is absolutely necessary to do so . You should be able to rinse out the media a number of time in used aquarium water to remove trapped debris. The beneficial bacteria are attached to the surfaces within the media, so they will survive unless you rinse them out it chlorinated water, in which case some of the bacteria may be killed.

By the way, do not rely on the manufacturer's filter ratings. For example, Aqueon sells their Aqueon 50 filter for tanks ranging from 20 gallons to 50 gallons. I use the filters on my 20 gallon tanks. If you use a prefilter sponge on the intake tube the flow will not be excessive for a 20 gallon tank. I like sizing my filters for 10 gph per gallon. Thus, for my 55 gallon tank, I use an AquaClear 110 which is rated for up to 110 gallon tanks, but at 500 gph is ideal for a 55 gallon tank.
 
  • Thread Starter

InTheBox

Member
RayClem said:
Over my decades of fishkeeping I have used a lot of different HOB filters: Aquaclear, Tetra Whisper, Penn Plax Cascade, Marineland Penguin, and Aqueon. They all have their advantgages and disadvantages. I have not used Seachem Tidal or Fluval C filters, but they look like good filters as well.

One of the biggest recommendation I make with any filter is to use a sponge prefilter. That coarse sponge will catch a lot of debris before it ever gets to your filter. Clean the prefilter every week or two so you can clean your main filter media far less often.

Like many here, I do not like the disposable filter cartridges. For one thing, most of the contain activated carbon. Although activate carbon does have it uses such as removing used medications or eliminating tank odors, for most tanks carbon is unnecessary and in some cases it might be doing more harm than good. That is especially the case if you tank has live plants.

Thus, I use the cartridges as a template to cut either a filter sponge or filter pad to fit the filter. My current favorite filter pad is the Acurel Waste and Debris Reducing Filter Pad. With the Aqueon filter, if you are using sponges, remove the blue piece that holds the cartridges and cut the sponge to fit the entire filter body. However, if you use filter pads like I do, the blue piece is ideal for holding the filter pads in place.

Whether you are using filter sponges or filter pads, only replace the filter media when it is absolutely necessary to do so . You should be able to rinse out the media a number of time in used aquarium water to remove trapped debris. The beneficial bacteria are attached to the surfaces within the media, so they will survive unless you rinse them out it chlorinated water, in which case some of the bacteria may be killed.

By the way, do not rely on the manufacturer's filter ratings. For example, Aqueon sells their Aqueon 50 filter for tanks ranging from 20 gallons to 50 gallons. I use the filters on my 20 gallon tanks. If you use a prefilter sponge on the intake tube the flow will not be excessive for a 20 gallon tank. I like sizing my filters for 10 gph per gallon. Thus, for my 55 gallon tank, I use an AquaClear 110 which is rated for up to 110 gallon tanks, but at 500 gph is ideal for a 55 gallon tank.
okay! thanks for the help, but how do i clean the filterpads/sponge, like replacing it, becuase if i get a new sponge or pad wouldn’t it just kill the the good bacteria and fish? oh and also my aqueon filter says it can do 250 GPH is that good enough for my 36 gal
 

RayClem

Member
InTheBox said:
okay! thanks for the help, but how do i clean the filterpads/sponge, like replacing it, becuase if i get a new sponge or pad wouldn’t it just kill the the good bacteria and fish? oh and also my aqueon filter says it can do 250 GPH is that good enough for my 36 gal
You only replace the sponge or filter pads when absolutely necessary. When you do a water change, rinse the filter media in the water you removed from the tank. that way, you won't harm the bacteria in the media.
 

Sanderguy777

Member
InTheBox said:
okay! thanks for the help, but how do i clean the filterpads/sponge, like replacing it, becuase if i get a new sponge or pad wouldn’t it just kill the the good bacteria and fish? oh and also my aqueon filter says it can do 250 GPH is that good enough for my 36 gal
Just squeeze the sponge out in WC water and then put it back into the filter.

Normally people recommend 4 to 5 times the tank volume in gph, so 36x4=144gph for example. Ray is saying to use a pump that is rated 10x your tank volume or 360gph. In my opinion, the filter you have would be fine.

I forget, what kind of fish are you getting/do you have? That is a bigger determining factor of what size pump you need...
 

86 ssinit

Member
For me hob filters should move 8-10x the volume of the tank. So both together will work. The tidal can be found on eBay for under 70 shipped. But if that’s to expensive get the marineland. Best bang for the buck. The tidal75 and the marineland both move 350gph. The tidal does it in a smaller package.
Canister filters should move 4-5x the volume.
 
  • Thread Starter

InTheBox

Member
Sanderguy777 said:
Just squeeze the sponge out in WC water and then put it back into the filter.

Normally people recommend 4 to 5 times the tank volume in gph, so 36x4=144gph for example. Ray is saying to use a pump that is rated 10x your tank volume or 360gph. In my opinion, the filter you have would be fine.

I forget, what kind of fish are you getting/do you have? That is a bigger determining factor of what size pump you need...
Ok, I'm planning on getting ten neons, 10-12 danios, and 10 juhli Cory, so mostly smaller fish.
 

Sanderguy777

Member
InTheBox said:
Ok, I'm planning on getting ten neons, 10-12 danios, and 10 juhli Cory, so mostly smaller fish.
I could be wrong, but I think danios are coldwater fish.
The other part sounds good though!
 

RayClem

Member
Sanderguy777 said:
Just squeeze the sponge out in WC water and then put it back into the filter.

Normally people recommend 4 to 5 times the tank volume in gph, so 36x4=144gph for example. Ray is saying to use a pump that is rated 10x your tank volume or 360gph. In my opinion, the filter you have would be fine.

I forget, what kind of fish are you getting/do you have? That is a bigger determining factor of what size pump you need...
The reason I recommend using filters whose flow is rated for 10x the tank volume is that the flow rate is typically measured with no media in the filter. When you add prefilter sponges and media, the flow rate will drop, perhaps even by half. You can never have too much filtration, but you can have too much flow.

I put a SunSun HW-3000 canister filter on a 40 gallon tank. The canister is rated a 793 gph. That seems like extreme overkill, but by the time the filter is filled with media and I put a prefilter sponge on the intake, the flow rate drops to about 400 gph. The HW-300 comes with a speed control for the motor. I am running it at half speed, so I am probably getting 200-250 gph. which is fine for a 40 gallon tank.

By the way, the OP indicated that he had added a sponge filter to the tank as well. With the Aquaclear 30 plus the sponge filter, there is more than enough filtration.
 
  • Thread Starter

InTheBox

Member
RayClem said:
The reason I recommend using filters whose flow is rated for 10x the tank volume is that the flow rate is typically measured with no media in the filter. When you add prefilter sponges and media, the flow rate will drop, perhaps even by half. You can never have too much filtration, but you can have too much flow.

I put a SunSun HW-3000 canister filter on a 40 gallon tank. The canister is rated a 793 gph. That seems like extreme overkill, but by the time the filter is filled with media and I put a prefilter sponge on the intake, the flow rate drops to about 400 gph. The HW-300 comes with a speed control for the motor. I am running it at half speed, so I am probably getting 200-250 gph. which is fine for a 40 gallon tank.

By the way, the OP indicated that he had added a sponge filter to the tank as well. With the Aquaclear 30 plus the sponge filter, there is more than enough filtration.
Even if the 250 is in half, 125, that's about 4 times the 36 gallon, a little less
so I think its good. but idk, I don't really want to buy a new filter, since I already have one, I just want to optimize it.
 

RayClem

Member
InTheBox said:
Even if the 250 is in half, 125, that's about 4 times the 36 gallon, a little less
so I think its good. but idk, I don't really want to buy a new filter, since I already have one, I just want to optimize it.
There is no need to go out and purchase a new filter. You will be amazed at how much more effective the filter will be if you add a sponge prefilter and replace the cartridge filters with better media.
 
  • Thread Starter

InTheBox

Member
RayClem said:
There is no need to go out and purchase a new filter. You will be amazed at how much more effective the filter will be if you add a sponge prefilter and replace the cartridge filters with better media.
okay, i got the prefilter, how does this look?
Sanderguy777 said:
Nope.
They come with carbon, a sponge, and some bio balls or ceramic media. I would set it up with a sponge on bottom, ceramic stuff in the middle, and another sponge on top. That way, if you ever start another tank, you can take out one sponge and put it in a new filter.

Same can be done with the ceramic media, or even an air powered sponge filter.
i’m so sorry for bothering you, but will filter foam/pads work just as well as sponge? i’m trying to fit a sponge in my filter right now, but the foam might be easier to use? you can just like the post if foam is just as good,
thanks!
 

RayClem

Member
The sponge prefilter looks great. It will keep debris out of the main filter chamber. If you see the flow of water through your filter start to taper off, remove the prefilter sponge and rinse it out in used tank water when you do water changes.

You can stuff some filter floss (polyester filling) into the small chamber where the water enters to trap some of the smaller stuff.

Some filters like the Aquaclear have an upflow water path, so you put the sponge on the bottom and then put biomedia on top. The Aqueon does not have this same upflow design as it is made to use with cartridge filters. Thus, I prefer cutting filter pads to fit the blue cartridge holders. I just put biomedia in a baG and insert it behind the filter Pads.

The discharge of the Aqueon filter has a slot (or two for the larger units) designed to fit the specialized Aqueon media for removal of ammonia, phosphate, etc. The Aqueon precut pads are quite expensive. If you do need specialized media, it is less expensive to purchase larger sheets and cut them to fit (1" x 4" works well). If you do not need specialized media, cut a piece of filter pad to fit in the slot to act as a final polisher.
 

Islandvic

Member
That is a good mod on the intake tube.

I have found the replacement foam blocks for Aquaclear filters (most times sold in packs of 3) are one of the most effect ways of adding DIY media to a filter. They are easily trimmed to fit the shape of the reservoir.

On a side note, after looking at your pic of the filter, I noticed the back glass is clear.

Consider using acrylic arts and crafts paint on the back glass of the tank. For $10 (including paint and supplies) you can totally transform the look of the tank. I would recommend either a black or a bright blue color.

All of my tanks have their backs painted black. The best way I have found to apply the paint, is to make multiple very light coats and let each coat dry thoroughly before applying the next.

Acrylic arts and crafts paint is water based and very easy to clean up with a wet rag.
 

Sanderguy777

Member
Islandvic said:
That is a good mod on the intake tube.

I have found the replacement foam blocks for Aquaclear filters (most times sold in packs of 3) are one of the most effect ways of adding DIY media to a filter. They are easily trimmed to fit the shape of the reservoir.

On a side note, after looking at your pic of the filter, I noticed the back glass is clear.

Consider using acrylic arts and crafts paint on the back glass of the tank. For $10 (including paint and supplies) you can totally transform the look of the tank. I would recommend either a black or a bright blue color.

All of my tanks have their backs painted black. The best way I have found to apply the paint, is to make multiple very light coats and let each coat dry thoroughly before applying the next.

Acrylic arts and crafts paint is water based and very easy to clean up with a wet rag.
is gloss best, or flat/matte? I think matte dries faster, but is less durable, at least in my experience.
 

Islandvic

Member
I'm not sure, good question though!
 

BiologicalNerd

Member
Sanderguy777 said:
is gloss best, or flat/matte? I think matte dries faster, but is less durable, at least in my experience.
It all is opinion... they all have a relatively equivalent lifespan so it’s just artists choice. Take time and think about what would compliment your fish/aquascape. Lots of factors will be involved such as lights, plants, fish, substrate, decor, etc;
 

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