Fertilisers and Algae

FunnyGhost

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Hello

So, I have a 29 galon aquarium with a lot of plants in it. Lots of types( amazon swords, anubias, alternanthera, limnobium, java fern, ludwigia, saggitaria, hygrophila). The aquarium is 2 months old. First 2 weeks I did a proper fishless cycle. Now I have 2 gouramis, some corys, some barbs, some galaxy rabora, 4 snails and a few ghost shrimps.
As equipment I have a LED light + a T8, Eheim 2215 filter + hydor koralia nano 425 for water circulation + pressurised CO2.
My questions :
1. All plants grow quite well, expecially the hygrophila and the amazon swords(the rubin types is awesome). All except the dwarf hair grass. That one refuses to grow. Absolutely no progress since day 1. Have no ideea why.
2. Most small plants appear to have some dust on leaves. I read that in fact it's diatoms. Constantly I feel the need to shake them a little to get the dust off. How can I get rid of it?
My water parameters:
pH: 7
kH: 7
NO2: 0
NO3: around 10-15
PO4: around 1

I dose using the EI method but here comes question 3:
3. If I see that on the day I should add macro the PO4 is 1 and the NO3 is 15. Should I still add those?
And the last question I promise:
4. If I try to increase the CO2 levels then the fish will have trouble breathing and will stay at the surface. Does this mean I have enough CO2?

Thanks a lot!
 

Linwood

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Are you using root tabs for the swords. Plants with a well developed root system benefit greatly from under-substrate feeding. I like Seachem root tabs.

Don't assume an increase in CO2 with injection will cause oxygen starvation, you can still have plenty of O2. I don't do CO2 injection so I won't try to answer more generally but there are a bazillion CO2-injected tanks with plenty of O2 for stocked fish.

WIth that much fish load you may find a need to cut back on NO3 eventually, though 10-15 is probably as low as you want to be for plant health.

In a new tank for reasons that still escape me you are almost always going to get a diatom algae bloom for a few weeks to a couple months. Despite many "do this and it goes away" I've never seen anything that is more definitive than "wait it out while keeping the plants healthy". I've found Ramshorn Snails as being a terrific cleanup for the brown stuff on leaves (not sure which snails you have).
 
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FunnyGhost

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Are you using root tabs for the swords. Plants with a well developed root system benefit greatly from under-substrate feeding. I like Seachem root tabs.

Don't assume an increase in CO2 with injection will cause oxygen starvation, you can still have plenty of O2. I don't do CO2 injection so I won't try to answer more generally but there are a bazillion CO2-injected tanks with plenty of O2 for stocked fish.

WIth that much fish load you may find a need to cut back on NO3 eventually, though 10-15 is probably as low as you want to be for plant health.

In a new tank for reasons that still escape me you are almost always going to get a diatom algae bloom for a few weeks to a couple months. Despite many "do this and it goes away" I've never seen anything that is more definitive than "wait it out while keeping the plants healthy". I've found Ramshorn Snails as being a terrific cleanup for the brown stuff on leaves (not sure which snails you have).
Thanks!
Lots of people are recommending Ottos but I am not sure. Maybe that would be too much for my aquarium.
Yes, I also added root tabs.
I will try to have more water surface agitation by moving the spray bar.
What about questions 1 and 3?
 

Linwood

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Thanks!
Lots of people are recommending Ottos but I am not sure. Maybe that would be too much for my aquarium.
Yes, I also added root tabs.
I will try to have more water surface agitation by moving the spray bar.
What about questions 1 and 3?
I added seven ottos to a 220G when I had a massive diatom bloom. Six died. From what I've read, this is not uncommon as their shipping conditions lead to starvation and they just can't handle coming back. But they are peaceful and clean well, and the one that survived now looks fine. However, that's a small tank and a lot of fish. OTOH you are doing EI which I presume means massive regular water changes so that's more a matter of taste than over stocking.

As to (1) my only suggestion was root tabs.

As to (3) I don't do EI, but 10:1 seems a decent ratio. But as to EI, may very, very loose understanding is you over-do it, then undo the over-do by a water change. Meaning you just keep doing it. Hopefully someone more knowledgeable will speak up. I'd certainly cut back on the NO3 if you start seeing the large fish load contributing enough that the nitrates start getting high (say over 60 ppm or so). In a moderately-to-heavily stocked planted tank you might see eventually no need for NO3.
 

CindiL

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Hi, if you're seeing "dust" that you can shake off then that is not diatoms. Depending on the type of ceramic media you have as it breaks down you will get white dust. I had this problem when I was using bio-max. The other thing that will create "dust" is any calcium/magnesium additives like replenish, equilibrium and such. Diatoms are orangish brown and slimy and won't shake off but they will rub off.

Can't help with the other questions because I don't use CO2, just root tabs.
 
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