Female (baby) Betta - Potential Tankmates

revelations

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I recently bought a baby female betta (saw it in the pet store, and felt bad for it), and put it in a 10G tank, currently alone, but was doing research to see what potential tank mates she can have.

From what I've read, most sources say that snails or shrimp are good tank mates.

  • [*=1]Does this apply to all shrimp? Or are there preferred ones? I would want red cherry shrimp...(if any pet stores near me have them)


Aside from shrimp and snails, any other fish? This is where I've read very ranging results. I read that endlers can be good, as well as ember tetras. Does anyone have an insights on this? I know it typically depends on the better itself, but is there a way to tell if there won't be problems?


That all being said, my betta seems pretty small/young right now, how big/old should she be before I attempt to add anything new?

The tank is 10G, and currently heated to ~81F degrees.
 

Flowingfins

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Bettas, females or males, should never be kept with fish in anything less than a 20 gallon long.
Keeping bettas with other fish is extremely stressful for them, it isn't natural. There is a high chance of aggression, putting your fish at risk of injury or even death.
Sororities should never ever be attempted in anything less than a 20 gallon long and are a minimum of 7 girls, this spreads out aggression and allow them space to get away.
I disagree with the statement that females are less aggressive than makes, I have found this untrue. IME, they can be even more aggressive.
The only thing you can put in with her are shrimp and snails, no fish are suitable for tank mates in a tank this small.
 

Flowingfins

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I'm going to be blunt here, and the majority of people on FL will tell you the same, bettas should not be kept with fish in anything less than a 20 gallon long. Ever. It might be working out for you, but in my experience, it will eventually go downhill. The betta will get fed up with the other fish, they will begin fighting over food, hiding spaces, or even areas of the tank. A 20 long is necessary to provide space for the fish to swim away, and even then they are still at risk of injury or death. Seemingly peaceful bettas have been known to suddenly snap, attacking all the other fish in their tank, usually killing them. A 10 gallon is simply too small, it doesn't provide enough room for the fish to swim away. Aquaphobia
 

Aquaphobia

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I have seen this happen in another overstocked tank where fish that should have been fighting didn't and I think the sheer overwhelming stress of their situation is what changed the dynamic. They were too busy surviving to bother fighting.

Frankly, I would rather have fish that are comfortable and uninterested in fighting than fish that are crammed in like sardines and unable to.
 
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revelations

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Flowingfins said:
I'm going to be blunt here, and the majority of people on FL will tell you the same, bettas should not be kept with fish in anything less than a 20 gallon long. Ever. It might be working out for you, but in my experience, it will eventually go downhill. The betta will get fed up with the other fish, they will begin fighting over food, hiding spaces, or even areas of the tank. A 20 long is necessary to provide space for the fish to swim away, and even then they are still at risk of injury or death. Seemingly peaceful bettas have been known to suddenly snap, attacking all the other fish in their tank, usually killing them. A 10 gallon is simply too small, it doesn't provide enough room for the fish to swim away. @Aquaphobia
Thank you.

How about shrimp? Specifically red cherry shrimp? (I'm not big on snails)
 

Flowingfins

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RCS(red cherry shrimp) are perfect, although some bettas will pick on them or kill them. If yours tolerates shrimp they'll make great tank mates!
 

Aquaphobia

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If you provide lots of plants for cover then enough of your shrimp should survive to procreate. The plants will also provide amusement for your betta
 
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Aquaphobia said:
If you provide lots of plants for cover then enough of your shrimp should survive to procreate. The plants will also provide amusement for your betta
That's the plan! I only have two live plants in the tank right now...it's my first entry with live plants, so I'm going in slowly to figure out what I'm doing.
 

Sarah73

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Like they said you don't want to add any other fish with a betta in a 10gal. That's to small for other fish and a beta. Snails and shrimp can be added though
 

Lady Monster

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My male betta killed 3 cherry shrimp with in hours of putting them in his 10 gallon.

Mystery snails were his tank mate for about 2 months but I just moved them to my 10 gallon shrimp tank. Dwarf shrimp are an expensive snack so be careful if your shrimp are juveniles and your betta is territorial.

Nerite snails are smaller than mystery snails and have patterned shells.
 

Sarah73

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Lady Monster said:
My male betta killed 3 cherry shrimp with in hours of putting them in his 10 gallon.

Mystery snails were his tank mate for about 2 months but I just moved them to my 10 gallon shrimp tank. Dwarf shrimp are an expensive snack so be careful if your shrimp are juveniles and your betta is territorial.

Nerite snails are smaller than mystery snails and have patterned shells.
Every betta has a different personality.
 

Lady Monster

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Sarah73 said:
Every betta has a different personality.
I know, that's why I'm saying it depends on the betta. Mine killed shrimp but doesn't bother the snails. Others have bettas with hundreds of shrimps and they're just fine but they nip off snails antennas!
 

Aquaphobia

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It's a matter of probabilities. On the low end you have fish like corydoras that you'd be surprised to find attacking their tankmates. At the high end you have cichlids and yes, bettas! They are more territorial than average and need to be watched closely. They may not be the most aggressive fish or the most likely to attack their tankmates, but the possibility is higher and for this reason are not recommended in community tanks. If you want to do it then, as Flowingfins said, a 20 long is a good minimum footprint because other fish have a chance to get out of harm's way.
 

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