Feeding shrimp & snails leaves from houseplants?

Brolli

Member
Hello there I was wondering if it's okay to feed my shrimps and snails dead or dying leaves from some of my houseplants? I have two that regularly have leaves dying off but I'm not sure which species. I'm just wondering because I want to feed these guys something the fish won't steal from them. If it's okay should they be prepared somehow or just dropped in and left to soak before falling to the bottom?
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kbn

Member
Dude, if I were you , I'd just cut up those leaves and throw them back in the pot with the plant. The shrimp can eat more nutritious food like boiled cabbage or boiled slices of any other vegetable. We don't know what kinds of toxins or chemicals there might be in those leaves, and there might be hardly any nutrition compared to what we have at hand already, stick to the tried and tested vegetables, a tiny portion out of your daily greens will do enough and is super healthy for the shrimp, just boil them first. I mean, those are unknown plants and I Doubt anyone here can really help... and there are many other better and healthier options. Plus the leaves can decompose and give back some nutrients to the parent plant. Best of luck!
 

MacZ

Member
A lot of house plants are actually poisonous when ingested. I would never feed any leaves of house plants to any animal, unless I was 100% sure it's a plant that is not toxic. I concurr with kbn, use them as compost for the plants they come from.
 
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Brolli

Member
Will do, thanks for the replies. I regularly throw in boiled cauliflower, brocoli and other greens. But they usually end up in the mouths of my various fish (guppies, cardinal and neon tetras) and the dominant amanos. The pieces are usually not big enough for all the smaller neocaridinas to get their fill. So maybe get a large brocoli and boil that? Or buy some dried leaves from a fish store so all the inverts can get a piece and the fish won't even bother with.
 

MacZ

Member
Brolli said:
Will do, thanks for the replies. I regularly throw in boiled cauliflower, brocoli and other greens. But they usually end up in the mouths of my various fish (guppies, cardinal and neon tetras) and the dominant amanos. The pieces are usually not big enough for all the smaller neocaridinas to get their fill. So maybe get a large brocoli and boil that? Or buy some dried leaves from a fish store so all the inverts can get a piece and the fish won't even bother with.
I was just going to say, go and collect some leaves as it's autmn right now, but then I saw where you live... Yeah, bought leaves from the store are shrimp magnets. :)
 
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Brolli

Member
MacZ said:
I was just going to say, go and collect some leaves as it's autmn right now, but then I saw where you live... Yeah, bought leaves from the store are shrimp magnets. :)
Hahahha, well we do have a good bit of vegetation here, at least in towns and small pockets of forests dotting the countryside. Native species of trees is only birch and then the smaller dwarf birch but non-native plants at least in Reykjavik we have alot of aspens, sorbus, willows, pine and more. Any of those have leaves good for shrimp? Should they always be boiled? Only trees at the top of my head that have a good feast size are the aspens. Birch for example has tiny leaves.
 

MacZ

Member
Brolli said:
Hahahha, well we do have a good bit of vegetation here, at least in towns and small pockets of forests dotting the countryside. Native species of trees is only birch and then the smaller dwarf birch but non-native plants at least in Reykjavik we have alot of aspens, sorbus, willows, pine and more. Any of those have leaves good for shrimp? Should they always be boiled? Only trees at the top of my head that have a good feast size are the aspens. Birch for example has tiny leaves.

Birch and aspens are fine but tend to rot unbelievably fast underwater. Sorbus might be a bit poisonous. Willow is ok. No conifers like pine. Collect a good amount of the leaves. I collected 2 25l bags last year in late september/early october, it got me until early july, that's when I had to start to buy leaves again. Right know we don't have enough fallen leaves, yet. Soon I'm going to collect again. I let them all rot until they are gone, I only got limpits and smaller stuff, no bigger snails or shrimp. Usually takes a few weeks depending on the leaves. My neighbour has a shrimptank, they disintegrate a leave in a few days.

Sorry I reacted with the cliché. I work with medieval icelandic literature (I'm right now doing the editorial of a saga translation) and studied scandinavian studies, I should know better. :D
 
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Brolli

Member
MacZ said:
Birch and aspens are fine but tend to rot unbelievably fast underwater. Sorbus might be a bit poisonous. Willow is ok. No conifers like pine. Collect a good amount of the leaves. I collected 2 25l bags last year in late september/early october, it got me until early july, that's when I had to start to buy leaves again. Right know we don't have enough fallen leaves, yet. Soon I'm going to collect again. I let them all rot until they are gone, I only got limpits and smaller stuff, no bigger snails or shrimp. Usually takes a few weeks depending on the leaves. My neighbour has a shrimptank, they disintegrate a leave in a few days.

Sorry I reacted with the cliché. I work with medieval icelandic literature (I'm right now doing the editorial of a saga translation) and studied scandinavian studies, I should know better. :D
Awesome man! Good luck with your work! The Sturlung age is imo the most interesting period of my country, alot of cool stuff being written then also. But I can't blame you I mean if you look at any pics of Iceland all you see is tundra with hardly any trees.
But if I'd get aspen leaves for example, would a time frame of 24 hours in the tank be too long?
 

MacZ

Member
Brolli said:
Awesome man! Good luck with your work! The Sturlung age is imo the most interesting period of my country, alot of cool stuff being written then also. But I can't blame you I mean if you look at any pics of Iceland all you see is tundra with hardly any trees.
But if I'd get aspen leaves for example, would a time frame of 24 hours in the tank be too long?
Definitely a highly interesting thing. We are right now working on the fornaldarsögur and before that I worked on an icelandic riddera saga. And for sure I got copies of the eddas and the landnamabók.

I leave leaves indefinitely in my tank. I add 3-4 leaves every 2-3 weeks. Make sure you only take completely yellow or brown leaves, no green spots.

But I'm thinking... how much volcanic dust is there in Reykjavík? It might be necessary to rinse them first, then short blanche with boiling water to make sure they sink. As you have shrimp they will break a leave down quite quickly.
 
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Brolli

Member
MacZ said:
Definitely a highly interesting thing. We are right now working on the fornaldarsögur and before that I worked on an icelandic riddera saga. And for sure I got copies of the eddas and the landnamabók.

I leave leaves indefinitely in my tank. I add 3-4 leaves every 2-3 weeks. Make sure you only take completely yellow or brown leaves, no green spots.

But I'm thinking... how much volcanic dust is there in Reykjavík? It might be necessary to rinse them first, then short blanche with boiling water to make sure they sink. As you have shrimp they will break a leave down quite quickly.
I'm actually not sure on the dust, but I highly doubt there's a significant level of it. Hasn't been an eruption for a few years now. But just to be on the safe side I'll rinse and boil.
 

MacZ

Member
Brolli said:
I'm actually not sure on the dust, but I highly doubt there's a significant level of it. Hasn't been an eruption for a few years now. But just to be on the safe side I'll rinse and boil.
I'm asking because a friend had some problems with it on his car when he worked in Reykjavík about three years ago. Thought I'd better ask.
 
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