Feeding Piggy Fish

Lauryn

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There are a lot of posts where people talk about feeding, and I know there is no wrong or right answer but I need some help.......

I currently have 4 endlers, 1 swordtail, 3 corydoras and in tank fish sitting 2 female bettas.

Prior to the fish sitting I fed the fish once a day in the morning one scoop of flakes and a half scoop of pellets. One day a week they have peas as a meal and they fast twice a week with no food on Tuesday and Saturday. When my friend asked me to fish sit her bettas I increased the scoops to 2 scoops of flakes (pictured). It has only been a week since the bettas were added and they will only be with me until the end of September.

The fish demolish the flakes in seconds then they will go for the corys pellets so I'm not sure if the corys are getting enough food. I've tried giving algae wafers but the corys are not interested. I thought I was under feeding at first however now I think the opposite. I thought one of the endlers was pregnant but after fasting day her belly went down which means she's overeating!!

What can I do to ensure the corys have enough food to eat?

How do I stop the other fishes from being so piggish?

What is your community tank feeding regimen?
 

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Guppygirl88

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Hello and welcome Nice, that picture is a big help! You could try feeding in two different places or break up the flakes into 3 small feedings like 1 or 2 min. apart so the E. and sword are waiting and watching for food while you feed Corys in the other spot. I think your feeding plenty. Corys won't go hungry they will butt their way in and get what they need because a Cory is really just a stomach with fins.
 

Tony_P

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My feeding routine is this .. flakes in the morning and pellets in the evening. I'm careful to not give too much so as not to overfeed. This only came about by observation. The guppies demolish the flakes so very little sinks. The pellets all tend to sink so the corys get almost all of it although the guppies to chase after the pellets as they are falling.

Now when I put cucumber in the tank, all bets are off as far as the ottos and guppies go -- its every fish for itself!

Tony
 

Tony_P

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What about trying to feed the corys some frozen bloodworms. The cube sinks after a while and my corys love ´em!
That's a thought -- although I usually let the frozen cubes thaw a bit and then break them up to drop them into the tank. I didn't think you could just toss a small dice sized cube into the tank

Tony
 

sr2z

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That's a thought -- although I usually let the frozen cubes thaw a bit and then break them up to drop them into the tank. I didn't think you could just toss a small dice sized cube into the tank
Well, I like to just toss it in because as the cube thaws, it deposites the worms evenly throughout the tank where all my fish can reach them.
 

sfsamm

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Most my tanks just kill their food in a few seconds too. So tanks that I have less voracious eaters with the more aggressive feeders I will feed after lights out. I have my cories with fish whom generally do not pick at the bottom except after their fast day which gives the cories two days of light feedings. My cories are constantly laying eggs on that schedule and have been for over a year so I assume it works well. My other slower feeders I keep with less aggressive eaters, alone or they feed primarily after dark anyway so the routine works well all around for me.
 

GuppyDazzle

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The best (only) way to know whether you're feeding too much is to test the water, otherwise you're just making a wild guess. Do you have a test kit? Assuming your tank is cycled, if you can keep your nitrate levels down to where you're comfortable and water changes are at reasonable intervals, you're not overfeeding, as toxin levels are determined by how much food you put in the tank, not by how many fish you have. Most people try to keep nitrates below 40 ppm.
 

Spulvert

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I absolutely love corydoras and I keep them with rainbowfish and tiger Barb's so I absolutely understand the concern with making sure they get their food. I feed my corydoras in two ways. Food for the other fish on the left side of the tank and fast sinking pellets for the Cory's on the right side of the tank. Also what I do is I drop pellets in at night after the light has been turned off. The rainbows and tiger Barb's don't even notice the pellets bc they're going through their "REM cycles"the Cory's are a lil bit more active so they'll get to em. But the key thing to remember with feeding is that you can do way more damage overfeeding than "underfeeding" . Good luck!
 
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Lauryn

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Thanks a lot everyone, I now have a few techniques to try out

The best (only) way to know whether you're feeding too much is to test the water, otherwise you're just making a wild guess. Do you have a test kit? Assuming your tank is cycled, if you can keep your nitrate levels down to where you're comfortable and water changes are at reasonable intervals, you're not overfeeding, as toxin levels are determined by how much food you put in the tank, not by how many fish you have. Most people try to keep nitrates below 40 ppm.
I never thought of it in that way. I have the API master test kit, nitrates are currently between 5.00ppm and 10.0ppm

What about trying to feed the corys some frozen bloodworms. The cube sinks after a while and my corys love ´em!
Are the bloodworms a treat or an everyday food?
 

GuppyDazzle

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I never thought of it in that way. I have the API master test kit, nitrates are currently between 5.00ppm and 10.0ppm
The API Master Test Kit is the most widely used kit and it works well.

Testing takes the guesswork out of maintaining your tanks. As mentioned before, you can monitor whether you're overfeeding by watching the nitrates. Also, if you set a schedule for water changes, like "I'm going to do water changes of 25% once a week," you're taking a guess at whether that's an appropriate volume or frequency. If you do water changes based on your test readings, you'll actually see what's going on with your parameters. With testing, a schedule will create itself, rather than guessing and testing later to see if it's working.
 
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