Feeding My Betta!

Discussion in 'Betta Fish' started by Lynn78too, Apr 15, 2017.

  1. Lynn78too

    Lynn78too Well Known Member Member

    I'm really embarrassed to admit this but I'll swallow my pride. I've had betta before and I've had other fish before but never have I combined the 2. Well last night I took the plunge and bought the beauty at the store. The I realized, uh-oh, how do I feed him so he gets the proper food and the other faster fish don't eat his food? There are female guppies in there, a platy (the last of them, I'm not going to be adding more), and red phantom tetra. The betta has been hiding and only comes out for short periods of time, he might swim around the bottom but he is pretty scared. He really likes the little driftwood cave and my staurogyne repens carpet and will wedge himself in between the plants. I worry by the time he decides to come up for food everything will be gone. Suggestions and help is much appreciated!

    Isn't he a beauty! He's from my Petco, I couldn't believe it!
    NewBetta.jpg
     
  2. Caitlin86

    Caitlin86 Well Known Member Member

    One idea is netting him and feeding him in the net whilst still being in the tank...that way u can 100% be sure he is getting adequate nutrition...only if this doesnt cause 2 much stress. You could also use a syringe and squirt the food right in front of him so he doesnt hafta fight for it. Btw I just wanted 2 mention soaking the betta pellets in aquarium water b4 feeding is essential..also their stomach is the size of their eye do 2-3 pellets r recommended. I have also read thats pellets should only be 25% of their diet. I hope this helps somewhat.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Lynn78too

    Lynn78too Well Known Member Member

    Maybe later on I could net him but for now he'd probably be too stressed by netting him each time. At this point he's been hiding and I can't imagine I'd be able to catch him without having to chase him around the tank. I'll go ahead and try the syringe after the others have had their food so they'll be less likely to want to eat his.
     




  4. BottomDweller

    BottomDweller Fishlore VIP Member

    I recommend hand feeding him. Bettas usually learn to hand feed pretty fast.

    That's nothing to be embarrassed about. I don't think I'll ever keep bettas with other fish.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Lynn78too

    Lynn78too Well Known Member Member

    Is there any reason other than potential aggression?
     
  6. Caitlin86

    Caitlin86 Well Known Member Member

    Hand feeding is a great idea..it took minimal time 2 teach my 2 bettas. I still usually do the syringe technique bc the pellets (after being soaked) fall apart between my fingers ....maybe bloodworms and brine shrimp wont. If u do try the syringe feeding u could always substitute the syringe 4 a turkey baster which is longer and may able 2 reach him wherever he is comfortable.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Lynn78too

    Lynn78too Well Known Member Member

    Ok, I tried the hand feeding, he kind of turned away when I dropped them in front of him, he was in his cave so hopefully he will eat it at some point.
     
  8. Caitlin86

    Caitlin86 Well Known Member Member

    Keep at it! Eventually he will relate ur hand with dinner!!
     
  9. Sen

    Sen Valued Member Member

    Is there something that the betta likes to look at and might be willing to follow around if you hold it up to the tank and move it? You might be able use that to coax him out of hiding, and up to the surface where he can be fed.

    I recommend having some sort of item that they can remember means, "I will get fed RIGHT NOW, WITHOUT DOUBT", and a section of the tank that you regularly put betta food at. (I personally use a toothpick, and I feed both of my bettas over the betta hammock leaf decoration in one corner of the tank.)

    Bettas are pretty smart--I believe they'll figure out feeding times if you keep them consistent. I usually feed my bettas one meal when I finish work, and lately my crowntail has taken to waiting for lunch at his betta hammock so his "feed me" face is the first thing I see when I check up on him when I get home:

    20170321_162720.jpg

    My delta tail refuses to pay attention unless I wave the toothpick in front of him. :/ Then he goes and sits on the hammock.

    Get a predictable routine/feeding behavior established, and I think your fish can handle the rest. :)
     
  10. CarrieFisher

    CarrieFisher Well Known Member Member

    You can teach him to jump!
    My last betta, Finn, would jump for food!

    Dab a bit of water on your finger so a single pellet sticks to it and hold it juuuuuust shy of the water's surface.
     
  11. M

    MaxG New Member Member

    So I recently added a DT/HM Betta Splendens into a newly cycled tank with 7 Harlequin Rasbora. For the first couple of days the Betta was showing signs of stress but he would eat food that had dropped to the surface.

    This may sound crazy but I pointed my finger at him and he followed my finger to the surface of the tank. The result? I can't stop him from eating now lol. I alternate between discus pellets/Betta mini pellets and live food on a three day cycle.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    Lynn78too

    Lynn78too Well Known Member Member

    So I've been hand feeding him, he was ignoring me at first and there I was with up to almost my armpit in fish water trying to get my fish to eat I dropped it in front of him, not sure if he ate it and hoping he had eaten enough at the store that he wouldn't die of starvation in the next few days while he got braver. Monday he kind of came out when I put my hand in then Tuesday he came out and at right away. His queue is apparently that I feed the other fish and he wants to eat too! If I don't feed the other fish they'll go after his food and he can't compete with the faster fish and some of them are pigs! He definitely isn't a vicious little guy that's for sure.
     




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