Fact Or Myth - Liquid Carbon Harmful To Bucephalandra Question 

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gok

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The Buce in my tank were becoming mushy and loosing leaves... One of my friends told me that liquid carbon is harmful to Bucephalandra...

Is this fact or Myth?
 

Thunder_o_b

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gok said:
The Buce in my tank were becoming mushy and loosing leaves... One of my friends told me that liquid carbon is harmful to Bucephalandra...

Is this fact or Myth?
I use it and have for years. There are plants that harms. But I can not say if the one you list is one of them.
 
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gok

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Thunder_o_b said:
I use it and have for years. There are plants that harms. But I can not say if the one you list is one of them.
I understand liquid carbon is an algaecide...

But not sure I have enough information to support that it is not harmful or that it is harmful...

I lost Buce in two tanks that was dosed with liquid carbon...
 

Thunder_o_b

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ahhh, the Godzilla plant. I have one. It is not growing the way I expected a plant with that name to grow. But it looks healthy enough.

I will keep an eye on it. I have had it a month. If there are any changes to it I will get back.
 

wintermute

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From what I have read, if the liquid carbon you are talking about is an algaecide, then it is probably glutaraldehyde, and what I have read about that makes me not want to use it! There are apparently liquid carbon products which do not contain glutaraldehyde, but what they do contain I don't know.

Tony.
 

-Mak-

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I’ve had many varieties of buce for years now and liquid carbon has never harmed them. However, they do tend to melt after being shipped in or moved, but their melt occurs a couple weeks after planting, after other plants have gone through melt. It’s when you think they’re not going to and least expect it
 
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gok

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Thunder_o_b said:
ahhh, the Godzilla plant. I have one. It is not growing the way I expected a plant with that name to grow. But it looks healthy enough.

I will keep an eye on it. I have had it a month. If there are any changes to it I will get back.
Godzilla plant? Where did Buce get such a name?

Why not jurassic plant or indominus plant?
 
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gok

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-Mak- said:
I’ve had many varieties of buce for years now and liquid carbon has never harmed them. However, they do tend to melt after being shipped in or moved, but their melt occurs a couple weeks after planting, after other plants have gone through melt. It’s when you think they’re not going to and least expect it
It has been in my tank for a couple of months and I was seeing new leaves too... But then it melted away... There was no drastic change in the water parameters...

The funny thing is it happened in two tanks at the same time....
 

Wraithen

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gok said:
Godzilla plant? Where did Buce get such a name? [ ]

Why not jurassic plant or indominus plant? [ ]
Because a lot of the names of the plant have Godzilla in them. Aside from the fact that 1 species may have 10 names now, they haven't been able to catalogue many of them. I suspect the main drivers in the catalogue game are the tissue culture companies.

I was upset that my Amazon shipper for mine used broken English. I assumed that meant I was getting a wild plant which I was sure wouldn't be on Amazon. Imagine my surprise when my bucephalandra kedagang Japan came in a tissue culture form and cup just as listed.

I think the Godzilla part is also a bit of closeted racism since japan is in a lot of the names. I could be COMPLETELY off base here though, since I've never looked it up and dont really care.

To the OP, liquid carbon is generally best reserved to being an algaecide. The benefits of liquid carbon will never be much, and never be worth the cost, in regards to helping plants grow.
 
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gok

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Wraithen said:
Because a lot of the names of the plant have Godzilla in them. Aside from the fact that 1 species may have 10 names now, they haven't been able to catalogue many of them. I suspect the main drivers in the catalogue game are the tissue culture companies.

I was upset that my Amazon shipper for mine used broken English. I assumed that meant I was getting a wild plant which I was sure wouldn't be on Amazon. Imagine my surprise when my bucephalandra kedagang Japan came in a tissue culture form and cup just as listed.

I think the Godzilla part is also a bit of closeted racism since japan is in a lot of the names. I could be COMPLETELY off base here though, since I've never looked it up and dont really care.

To the OP, liquid carbon is generally best reserved to being an algaecide. The benefits of liquid carbon will never be much, and never be worth the cost, in regards to helping plants grow.
I guess there are different names used for Buce at different regions...

My seller called a variegated variety as snow white and another as king kong...

It is funny how they come up with these names...
 
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