Experience with green stone?

Finatic005

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Hello Fishlore,

I really like the way green stone looks from manzanita driftwood and I was wondering if it changes pH or any other parameters? Thanks in advice.
 

zorianak

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I heard a long time ago to not mix wood and stone together as it can mess with your parameters, but I'm no longer very sure if that's true or not. Going to post here to follow this thread to see if there's an update on that, because that's a question I have as well.
 
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Finatic005

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faydout said:
Wouldn't most substrates just be varying sizes of tiny stones?
Yes.... but I am wondering if green stone will change pH.
 

zorianak

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faydout said:
Wouldn't most substrates just be varying sizes of tiny stones?
My understanding is that's a bit "different" than something like greenstone or other aquascaping stones. Those can release KH into your water which can cause weird fluctuations - at least, that was what I was told several years ago, and lead to me removing the rocks from my aquarium.
 

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I think the Green Stone you are referring to is a porous igneous rock. My guess is that its inert, like most lava rocks commonly found in aquariums.
Considering its being offered by an aquarium decor company, probably fine for your tank.
 

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zorianak said:
My understanding is that's a bit "different" than something like greenstone or other aquascaping stones. Those can release KH into your water which can cause weird fluctuations - at least, that was what I was told several years ago, and lead to me removing the rocks from my aquarium.
All rock are not the same. Some like limestone can affect the perimeters. For examlpe, It can be used if someone needs to raise the PH in their tank. Others are totally inert and have no ill affects at all.
 
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Finatic005

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A201 said:
I think the Green Stone you are referring to is a porous igneous rock. My guess is that its inert, like most lava rocks commonly found in aquariums.
Considering its being offered by an aquarium decor company, probably fine for your tank.
ok thanks

I just looked it up and it is not lava rock. It is smooth stone with green shade
It is not lava rock it is a smooth green stone which is not porous. It is just listed as green rock on manzanita driftwood

 

A201

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Never seen that variety of rock before.
 

julifhy

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You can contact manzanita driftwood and ask them about that. They have great customer service.
 

wisecrackerz

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Looks like there are a lot of things that can sold under the name "greenstone." Because they're all different minerals, they'll all have different chemical properties. Some may raise your pH, your K+, or Ca+.

The best, quickest, and easiest way to test the "greenstone" in question:
Put a sample of the stone you're wondering about into a clear Tupperware container, full of white vinegar. If tiny bubbles form on any part of the rock, you have evidence of a chemical reaction between the acidic vinegar, and basic rock. This indicates that the rock would cause a change in your tank parameters, and is a poor choice as a tank ornament, unless your aI'm is to increase both your pH, and your overall hardness.
This test will work on any stone you're wondering about putting in your tank.

From wiki:
"Greenstone
artifacts may be made of greenschist, chlorastrolite, serpentine, omphacite, chrysoprase, olivine, nephrite, chloromelanite among other green-hued minerals. The term also includes jade and jadeite, although these are perhaps more frequently identified by these latter terms."
 
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Finatic005

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julkosi17 said:
You can contact manzanita driftwood and ask them about that. They have great customer service.
I did contact them. Thanks!

A201 said:
Never seen that variety of rock before.
Hmmm...

wisecrackerz said:
Looks like there are a lot of things that can sold under the name "greenstone." Because they're all different minerals, they'll all have different chemical properties. Some may raise your pH, your K+, or Ca+.

The best, quickest, and easiest way to test the "greenstone" in question:
Put a sample of the stone you're wondering about into a clear Tupperware container, full of white vinegar. If tiny bubbles form on any part of the rock, you have evidence of a chemical reaction between the acidic vinegar, and basic rock. This indicates that the rock would cause a change in your tank parameters, and is a poor choice as a tank ornament.

From wiki:
"Greenstone
artifacts may be made of greenschist, chlorastrolite, serpentine, omphacite, chrysoprase, olivine, nephrite, chloromelanite among other green-hued minerals. The term also includes jade and jadeite, although these are perhaps more frequently identified by these latter terms."
Thanks! This is a very useful tip to use that I didn't know. Interesting. That's confusing that there are so many different things that could make up green stone.
 

wisecrackerz

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It's because "green stone" isn't really the name of a mineral, as opposed to things like "jade," or "emerald." It's just what that particular retailer is calling a stone they sell, because it happens to be green. It would be like buying "white stone," or "smooth stone;" it's just an adjective used by the retailer, rather than any kind of scientific terminology.
 
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Finatic005

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wisecrackerz said:
It's because "green stone" isn't really the name of a mineral, as opposed to things like "jade," or "emerald." It's just what that particular retailer is calling a stone they sell, because it happens to be green. It would be like buying "white stone," or "smooth stone;" it's just an adjective used by the retailer, rather than any kind of scientific terminology.
Hmm ok. I wonder why they do this...
 

A201

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IMO, better to use porous rocks, ones with holes & crevaces, or rocks that are easily stacked & leaned. All aquarium rocks will turn green soon enough once algae takes hold.
 
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Finatic005

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A201 said:
IMO, better to use porous rocks, ones with holes & crevaces, or rocks that are easily stacked & leaned. All aquarium rocks will turn green soon enough once algae takes hold.
I agree, but I specifically wanted smooth rock for the look I am going for.
 

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