Eco-complete & Soil

  • Thread starter

JDWebb01

Valued Member
Messages
119
Reaction score
64
Points
38
Experience
Just started

MikeRad89

Well Known Member
Messages
3,046
Reaction score
1,433
Points
198
Experience
5 to 10 years
Unless you're planting an oak tree in there that is a huge amount of nutrients. I would go with something inorganic to cap the eco complete.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter

JDWebb01

Valued Member
Messages
119
Reaction score
64
Points
38
Experience
Just started

MikeRad89

Well Known Member
Messages
3,046
Reaction score
1,433
Points
198
Experience
5 to 10 years
That's what I would do personally. Eco complete with a gravel/sand cap.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter

JDWebb01

Valued Member
Messages
119
Reaction score
64
Points
38
Experience
Just started
Thanks, what thickness of sand/gravel would you use in that case?
 

angelcraze

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,195
Reaction score
3,481
Points
498
Experience
More than 10 years
I used eco complete in my 120 gallon and honestly don't think it's very helpful for growing plants. It is really just expensive igneous rock, totally inert with a low CEC. Sorry to say, but I wish I had known before I got it.

It's nice though and could be used as a cap for soil IMO. It's how I have it atm. But I'm not familiar with Controsoil and just use organic potting soil, so have no info about it.

In my other tanks, I use organic potting soil capped with Pool Filter Sand and a bit of pea gravel here and there on top to help anchor the plants and I like the look.

Aim for a nutrient rich substate with a high cation exchange (CEC). That way when the nutrients are exhausted, you can just a root tab to recharge it. The cap is just you hold the nutrient rich substrate down, so inert sand or gravel is best.

There's also the option of using Safe T Sorb as a cap. It absorbs compounds like tannins to keep the water clear if you're not into the amber color a lot of soil based leech out.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter

JDWebb01

Valued Member
Messages
119
Reaction score
64
Points
38
Experience
Just started
So I'll use an inert material i.e sand/gravel to build my elevations then use the Controsoil as the planting medium.
 

angelcraze

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,195
Reaction score
3,481
Points
498
Experience
More than 10 years
JDWebb01 said:
So I'll use an inert material i.e sand/gravel to build my elevations then use the Controsoil as the planting medium.
Sure! Btw, to create hills and gradient, you could fill pantyhose up and tie at the ends to make "gravel rocks". They help retain a elevated shape since substrate trends to flatten out with erosion in the tank.

I used rocks and dirt (soil) to build up my hills and such. The rocks retain the soil under and against the driftwood. Then I capped the whole thing with PFS and gravel. It has kept is shape pretty well for 5 years!
December 2, 2017 55304 PM EST.jpg

It's a large 90 gallon, and there are 8 inch dirt beds at the back.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter

JDWebb01

Valued Member
Messages
119
Reaction score
64
Points
38
Experience
Just started
Excellent idea! I have a bunch of small nylon bags I use for homebrewing that can be used, they will also help prevent the hills from sliding down when I place the heavier rocks on them.
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom