Earthworms

Fishgod123

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Is it safe to feed my fish earthworms that I dig up in my garden? There haven't been any chemicals used. I'm mainly worried about my fish getting an internal parasite. Thanks
 

Burnout1620

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I wouldn’t even think about it unless your garden is entirely organic (no fertilizers, weed killers, etc.) Plus it would take a pretty big fish to be able to eat one.

Anything that earthworm has been in or around will be introduced into your tank if you do. I don’t think it’s worth the risk.
 

goldface

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Yes, I do it on occasion. Fish love it.
 

yukondog

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Same here, my fish are on the smaller size 2" or less and I need to cut them up very small.
 

DuaneV

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I do it all the time. Matter of fact, I feed my fish all sorts of things from outside all summer long. More than likely its 100% fine. That said, it should only be as a treat every once in a while, not a staple food.
 

!poogs!

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Agree with everything said, the only reason I would never ever do it is, you can’t control what kind of parasites you will introduce to the tank, water, and the fish.
 

DoubleDutch

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!poogs! said:
Agree with everything said, the only reason I would never ever do it is, you can’t control what kind of parasites you will introduce to the tank, water, and the fish.
such as ?
 

Annie59

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!poogs! said:
Specific to an aquarium? Hookworm is commonly found in garden soil.
I don't think they will get hookworms from the soil, if that were the case several of us would be loaded down with them as some of us use dirt directly out of the yard. Even if they are, can they survive for long in a tank full of water? I don't think they can, but I could be wrong. I googled it and it said nothing about that type of worm living or breeding in fish...
 

!poogs!

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Annie59 said:
I don't think they will get hookworms from the soil, if that were the case several of us would be loaded down with them as some of us use dirt directly out of the yard. Even if they are, can they survive for long in a tank full of water? I don't think they can, but I could be wrong. I googled it and it said nothing about that type of worm living or breeding in fish...
I’m not saying it’s a for sure thing. I’m just saying your garden soil is not a sterile environment, not even close. And most aquarium fish weren’t bred or raised in a natural environment. They are bubble fish. There will be parasites in your soil. Everyone is free to do what they want in the hobby. Me personally, not my thing. I do my best to source foods free of bacteria and parasites.
 

goldface

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!poogs! said:
I’m not saying it’s a for sure thing. I’m just saying your garden soil is not a sterile environment, not even close. And most aquarium fish weren’t bred or raised in a natural environment. They are bubble fish. There will be parasites in your soil. Everyone is free to do what they want in the hobby. Me personally, not my thing. I do my best to source foods free of bacteria and parasites.
Too many hobbyists, I believe, coddle their fish too much and try and do everything by the "book." They boil and sterilize everything; they try to chase an exact temperature; they have 3 schools of 6 fish each in the same tank, because the arbitrary rule of 6 says it's okay; and the list goes on. But I'm not one of them. I like to question the norm, because I can't help but notice the inconsistencies in logic. I personally think it's okay to feed your fish something you harvested from the outdoors, or to find a nice piece of rock or driftwood at a riverbank during low tide and giving it a simple rinse before placing it inside a tank. As far as fish being bred in sterile bubbles, I doubt that's the case for many large scale operations. Here's a nice video that I recently watched and thoroughly enjoyed.
 

DuaneV

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Agree. Ive been harvesting worms, flies, crickets, grasshoppers, frogs, mosquito larvae, rocks, wood, soil, sand, leaves, etc., from the environment since Ive been keeping fish. 42 years. I just completed a "first" for me a few weeks back when I bought substrate for the first time EVER. Ive never purchased wood, rocks, leaves, etc., either and NEVER have I had something in my tank that I thought came in from an outside source other than an accidental snail last year. And the ONLY reason that happened was, the bleach I used to dip the plants was diluted 50/50 already and I had no idea (I read my wife the riot act and still bring it up once in a while, lol). Fish live in INCREDIBLY variable/tough conditions in the wild and our aquarium fish have no idea theyre not in the wild. People worry WAY too much about their fish, in my opinion. Once you get past the cycling stuff and really know what you're doing with it, there isn't too much that can go wrong as long as you're keeping them at decent/correct temps, changing water and feeding them well (I don't mean a lot, I mean with the right amount and kinds of foods).
 

!poogs!

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scarface said:
Too many hobbyists, I believe, coddle their fish too much and try and do everything by the "book." They boil and sterilize everything; they try to chase an exact temperature; they have 3 schools of 6 fish each in the same tank, because the arbitrary rule of 6 says it's okay; and the list goes on. But I'm not one of them. I like to question the norm, because I can't help but notice the inconsistencies in logic. I personally think it's okay to feed your fish something you harvested from the outdoors, or to find a nice piece of rock or driftwood at a riverbank during low tide and giving it a simple rinse before placing it inside a tank. As far as fish being bred in sterile bubbles, I doubt that's the case for many large scale operations. Here's a nice video that I recently watched and thoroughly enjoyed.
Yes that’s one wAy of looking at it for sure. That’s what makes the hobby so unique and so much fun.

My comment on fish being bred in bubbles was satire. Back in the beginning of this hobby lots of fish were naturally sourced. These days there are a lot more domestic breeding operations. Back in the day we would try and make out tank parameters match South American and African water ways they originate from. Now we just have to make sure they match the tap water from somewhere in the USA. Hence my fish in a bubble comment.

No one should post on a forum and expect to agree with everyone on everything.

I say what I would do, you say what you would do, and then we confuse the heck out of everyone until they decide to take a chance on what they want to do.

It would be like saying their is only one recipe in the world for chocolate cake.
 

FishMommer

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Can't wait to watch the Corey video. Love them. Also love reading all the comments here. Especially you adventurous types. I am way too worried about killing off my kids fish. Many many years ago as a teen or so I put outdoor rocks in my aquarium. Lots of deaths so I never tried again. But who knows - it was so long ago I don't remember what all else was happening. Of course I also kept Angels in less than 30 gallon back then too (and a pleco). :bag: Ah maybe one day I will get an Angel again.
 

DoubleDutch

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scarface said:
Too many hobbyists, I believe, coddle their fish too much and try and do everything by the "book." They boil and sterilize everything; they try to chase an exact temperature; they have 3 schools of 6 fish each in the same tank, because the arbitrary rule of 6 says it's okay; and the list goes on. But I'm not one of them. I like to question the norm, because I can't help but notice the inconsistencies in logic. I personally think it's okay to feed your fish something you harvested from the outdoors, or to find a nice piece of rock or driftwood at a riverbank during low tide and giving it a simple rinse before placing it inside a tank. As far as fish being bred in sterile bubbles, I doubt that's the case for many large scale operations. Here's a nice video that I recently watched and thoroughly enjoyed.
Applause scarface. Exact how I see it.

The worst disastrous diseases have occured out of sterilized environments.
DGD, resistant strains if Ich, (Columnaris) bacteria etc etc.....

Even humans show more (allergic) reactions and are less resistant to bacteria aso cause everything have to be sterile nowadays.

I think putting in sonething from an LFS (fish, plants, food, etc....) is taking a bigger risk by far than putting something in from nature.

I rinse wood, rocks and food en drop it in without any doubt (only being sure there aren't other human pests as pesticides and herbicides used)
 

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