Dwarf Frogs In A 10 Gallon

Brenden
  • #1
So I been looking more and more at the African Dwarfs. I think they're very neat. I just need some more info.

I have a 10 gallon currently. The current occupants are 1 betta, and 2 nerite snails. I got a bunch of pest snails, but I don't plan on keeping them around too long.

Is it a good idea to introduce a dwarf? What is their dietary needs? Also are they loud at night? Do I need more than one?

I'm just trying to spice my tank up, it's very dull rn and while I know bettas don't really get bored it just seems boring. Plus I like weird creatures. I keep getting ghost shrimp but my Betta sees them as a snack more than anything else. I don't think the Betta would go after frogs.
 
BReefer97
  • #2
If he goes after shrimp, there's probably no doubt he would go after a dwarf frog. They both need to breath air at the surface of the water, so they would be up in each other's space often. Betta fish are sometimes known to eat the limbs off of the frogs. My point is, ADFs do best in a species only tank.
 
Brenden
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
If he goes after shrimp, there's probably no doubt he would go after a dwarf frog. They both need to breath air at the surface of the water, so they would be up in each other's space often. Betta fish are sometimes known to eat the limbs off of the frogs. My point is, ADFs do best in a species only tank.

Good point.

However I do have various hiding places for frogs that the fish can't get into. Do you think it would be worth a shot to get one even? And is 10 gal too small for them?

I think the only reason the Betta goes after my ghost is because my ghost previously had no hiding places. Maybe with the decorations I have now, a frog may have a better chance?
 
david1978
  • #4
I know people do it but probably shouldn't. Frogs have poor eyesight and are easily outcompeted for food. They can also mistake fins for food or the betta may mistake their toes or legs as food.
 
Brenden
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
I know people do it but probably shouldn't. Frogs have poor eyesight and are easily outcompeted for food. They can also mistake fins for food or the betta may mistake their toes or legs as food.

Hmm, well I figure I could always try it and test it.

Worst comes to worse I can take it back to the store.
 
BReefer97
  • #6
Like I said, even if there are hiding places, both the frog and betta fish go to the surface of the water for air. Dwarf frogs are also really really active, and if you put one in a tank with a betta fish, it's probably going to be stressed out because like mentioned above - they have bad eyesight.

And no, worse comes to worse your betta fish is going to eat him.


My only question is why make this thread and ask us our opinion if you're going to go ahead and do it regardless?
 
Brenden
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
Like I said, even if there are hiding places, both the frog and betta fish go to the surface of the water for air. Dwarf frogs are also really really active, and if you put one in a tank with a betta fish, it's probably going to be stressed out because like mentioned above - they have bad eyesight.

And no, worse comes to worse your betta fish is going to eat him.


My only question is why make this thread and ask us our opinion if you're going to go ahead and do it regardless?

To get opinions on it.
 
BReefer97
  • #8
To get opinions on it.

Well if all of the opinions tell you no, it's not a good idea - why decide to do it? Makes no sense.
 
Brenden
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
Well if all of the opinions tell you no, it's not a good idea - why decide to do it? Makes no sense.
I said I "could" try it. Didn't say I was going to.
 
Taylor634
  • #10
I said I "could" try it. Didn't say I was going to.
My friends betta ate the legs off of her frog after they had lived together for months, so I'd also say it isn't a good idea because they may get along in the beginning but it's likely to happen eventually. And if you just try it remember, you're risking lives
 
glenCOCO
  • #11
Time to play devil’s advocate. ADFs are actually regarded in the betta community as one of the most compatible tank mates for bettas. I’ve seen bettas go after shrimp and completely ignore ADFs, so it doesn’t always go hand in hand. In a 10 gallon there’s plenty of surface area for them to come up for air without getting in each other’s way. More than likely they won’t all be going up at once anyway. They do best in groups of 2-3. The singing really isn’t all that loud, just a slight buzzing. Your biggest issue is going to be feeding. They don’t have the best eyesight so you’re going to have to spot feed them so the betta won’t be getting to the food first. Even then they don’t always get the hint that frozen bloodworms are food. If you can get your hands on some live blackworms that would be ideal.
 
smartfish24
  • #12
Buy small betta tank and put it in there and put Frog in 10 gallon tank.
 
Brenden
  • Thread Starter
  • #13
Buy small betta tank and put it in there and put Frog in 10 gallon tank.

Small tanks become dirty, nasty smelling messes very quick. I had my betta in one, had to buy a 10 gal because the smell alone killed me.
 
Blaze
  • #14
Ok this is just my opinion, if I were you I'd just upgrade to either a 20 or 30 gallon so you wouldn't have to worry about the adf and the Betta being to close to each other.
Plus you'll be able to get more fish or adfs to house.
 
glenCOCO
  • #15
90% of this hobby is trying to come up with excuses to get a bigger tank. I say you go that route, lol
 

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