Dwarf cobalt gourami sick

Mk47582

Hi all,
My cobalt dwarf gourami is not doing well. First, my tank parameters: 16 gallon tank with 4 nerite snails, 4 platies, 1dwarf gourami (the ill one), 2 juvenile fancy guppies. Tank cleaned every Sunday with 1/3 water change, gravel vacuum, etc. Ph 7.4, NH3/4 0, NO2 0, NO3 0-5ppm (Yellow with a slight hint of orange). Temp 26 Celsius, (78.8 f).
I’ve had him since October. He started this week being a little lethargic, lost his colour, appetite not great, he is normally a voracious eater and I can feed him from my fingers. Because of this, I threw in some aquarium salt and some seachem stress guard. This did not improve things. This morning, he was floating in his side in the tank. Would not move if I touched his fins but jumped when I gently touched his exposed side. Looks like he has some light brown lesions along his back spine where i
his upper back fin ends. Small, maybe 2mm round. Can’t seem to get a good pic of it. He also looks a little on the bloated side.
After work today I put him in an injured fish box with some cooked peas, no interest (For the bloat, was thinking a problem with his swim bladder?). At this point I’m realizing I need a hospital tank and quickly set mine up (I keep filter pieces in another cycled tank so I alway have a cycled tank, or at least close to cycled ready). Canadians can’t get antibiotics for fish in Canada anymore without a veterinary script (as I’m told by local fish stores), all I can get my hands on is tetra Lifeguard which the hospital tank is now dosed with, and no carbon in the filter.
Anyone have a take on what is going on here? Is this the dwarf gourami iridovirus? Am I doing the right thing, and is there more I can do? Would really like to save this little guy!
Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
 

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Dunk2

I’m not a disease expert, but it sounds like dwarf Gourami iridovirus.
jinjerJOSH22
 
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Mk47582

Ok, what I’m reading online is that regardless of what I do, this is fatal... poor little man, I feel so bad for him. Wondering if I should find a way to put him down humanely as this is hard to watch for me, and must be horrible for him...
 
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Dunk2

Ok, what I’m reading online is that regardless of what I do, this is fatal... poor little man, I feel so bad for him. Wondering if I should find a way to put him down humanely as this is hard to watch for me, and must be horrible for him...

Give jinjerJOSH22 some time to respond.
 
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Mk47582

Yes, I’ll give him some time to respond to the meds. Fingers crossed. And if anyone else has suggestions, I’m all ears. Thanks guys!
 
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jinjerJOSH22

Hi, unfortunately there doesn't look like there's much you can do at this point. Whether it is an iridovirus(which lesions around the spleen are a typical symptom of) or something else, when fish start to roll it's usually a sign of the end. What makes most illnesses deadly for Dwarf Gourami is their poor genetics, they just can't cope with what most fish can.

I really don't like saying this but it may be best to save yourself from the stress and him from any suffering and euthanize. You could always wait and see if any meds work but I wouldn't be too hopeful.

I'm sorry =(
 
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Mk47582

Hi, unfortunately there doesn't look like there's much you can do at this point. Whether it is an iridovirus(which lesions around the spleen are a typical symptom of) or something else, when fish start to roll it's usually a sign of the end. What makes most illnesses deadly for Dwarf Gourami is their poor genetics, they just can't cope with what most fish can.

I really don't like saying this but it may be best to save yourself from the stress and him from any suffering and euthanize. You could always wait and see if any meds work but I wouldn't be too hopeful.

I'm sorry =(
Thank you for your honest opinion. I do appreciate it, despite it not being what I want to hear. I am going to let the meds work for a day, and then make a decision re: euthanasia, if Mother Nature doesn’t make it for me. My family thinks I’m nuts and laugh at my hospital tank, but it is amazing to me how these little creatures just steal your heart. I have to try to save him, I can’t just stand back and watch. I will post an update tomorrow. Hoping, fingers crossed...
 
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Mk47582

Update: my little man is still alive! More upright, not floating on his side as much. I see this as an improvement, but I’m cautious with thinki this because I know this is what I want to see. Still ++ lethargic, no appetite, and letting out long stringy white fecal material.
Still not sure what the best thing to do here is, should I put him down humanely? Or continue to give him a chance with the Tetra Lifeguard medication? I’m kinda on the fence, and I hate to see him suffer but I also don’t want to give up too early....
 
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DoubleDutch

Uhhhh medication against what exactly ?
 
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Mk47582

Uhhhh medication against what exactly ?
Symptoms mentioned in the original post
And another update: came out of my office to check on everyone, and my little man is dead. I tried but it was not enough. Thank you everyone for your advice.
 
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Dunk2

Symptoms mentioned in the original post
And another update: came out of my office to check on everyone, and my little man is dead. I tried but it was not enough. Thank you everyone for your advice.

Sorry the little guy didn’t make it.

Take this advice or leave it. . . Unless you know exactly what you’re medicating for, it’s probably best not to medicate.
 
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DoubleDutch

Symptoms mentioned in the original post
And another update: came out of my office to check on everyone, and my little man is dead. I tried but it was not enough. Thank you everyone for your advice.

Not want to be rude or offensive but :

As Dunk2 says : Think on should treat based on a diagnosed disease and not on symptoms / suspecion.

There are several meds that treat "anything" but in fact are a shot in the dark cause the keeper doesn't have a clue what is wrong.
Those meds are "designed" for those cases. General Cure should be called General Confusion and Tetra Lifeguard should also have another namr.


To be honest : When / If a fish has reached the stage yours was in I think one should accept it is irreversable and any expense on meds is profit for the LFS / aquabrands.

Think it is a matter of experience though to treat or sometimes let a fish go.

Sorry you faced this and sorry for you fish.
 
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Mk47582

Not want to be rude or offensive but :

As Dunk2 says : Think on should treat based on a diagnosed disease and not on symptoms / suspecion.

There are several meds that treat "anything" but in fact are a shot in the dark cause the keeper doesn't have a clue what is wrong.
Those meds are "designed" for those cases. General Cure should be called General Confusion and Tetra Lifeguard should also have another namr.


To be honest : When / If a fish has reached the stage yours was in I think one should accept it is irreversable and any expense on meds is profit for the LFS / aquabrands.

Think it is a matter of experience though to treat or sometimes let a fish go.

Sorry you faced this and sorry for you fish.
Thank you for this. I had three options: humanely euthanize, attempt medication without knowing exactly what was wrong and no access to an aquatic vet, or stand back and watch and wait, which to me was the worst option. I opted to “try” but my intuition was that it was not going to work. As a family we were making decisions every 6 hours or so, do we continue to try meds, or do we euthanize. We were excited to see that he was able to hold himself in a normal position rather than floating on his side after a night of treatment, so we were encouraged. When I went to check on him later that day, he had passed and that decision was made for us.
Euthanizing is an incredibly hard decision. The back story to this fish was the loss of an elderly dog and a new puppy all within a matter of weeks. I got the tank and the fish to help everyone take their minds off the loss, and I love fish as well. So Kobe, the gourami, was the first fish in the tank and thus I think it was harder than ever to let him go. I’m sad he died, but i am thankful his suffering is over. All of this gives me more experience on what to do if I’m faced with this again in the future during my fish keeping adventures.
Thank you everyone.
 
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jinjerJOSH22

Thank you for this. I had three options: humanely euthanize, attempt medication without knowing exactly what was wrong and no access to an aquatic vet, or stand back and watch and wait, which to me was the worst option. I opted to “try” but my intuition was that it was not going to work. As a family we were making decisions every 6 hours or so, do we continue to try meds, or do we euthanize. We were excited to see that he was able to hold himself in a normal position rather than floating on his side after a night of treatment, so we were encouraged. When I went to check on him later that day, he had passed and that decision was made for us.
Euthanizing is an incredibly hard decision. The back story to this fish was the loss of an elderly dog and a new puppy all within a matter of weeks. I got the tank and the fish to help everyone take their minds off the loss, and I love fish as well. So Kobe, the gourami, was the first fish in the tank and thus I think it was harder than ever to let him go. I’m sad he died, but i am thankful his suffering is over. All of this gives me more experience on what to do if I’m faced with this again in the future during my fish keeping adventures.
Thank you everyone.
I'm sorry to hear about everything that has happened, bad things always seem to happen at once. I hope your family and yourself stay strong, and I wish you all well.

I hope the experience with the Gourami doesn't put you off keeping others. There are better options out there and one I would highly recommend is a pair or trio of Honey Gourami. Just be sure to check whether they are true Honeys or Thick Lipped Gourami. Stores often confuse them.
If you're tempted by Dwarf Gourami again I recommend reading my article on my thoughts about them: https://www.fishlore.com/aquariumfi...hts-on-dwarf-gourami-trichogaster-lalius.194/
 
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