Dropsy Prevention / Cure ? Question

  1. XenoMarc Member Member

    Hello,
    My family and I have a Juwel Rio 240l tank with 8 neon tetras, 6 panda cories, 5 male assorted guppies, 4 honey Gouramis and 1 juvenile super red bristlenose pleco.
    I used to have 6 guppies but one of them, Zulu, died from dropsy. When we bought him, his belly was already a little bloated and when he died, his scales were acorned and a big bloated belly.
    When feeding the fish, I noticed some small bloated bellies on some of my guppies. I don't know whether it is dropsy or not for sure but is there anyway I can prevent/cure it?
    I do know there currently isn't an official cure but is there anyway to prevent dropsy?
    Thank you and have a nice day! :]
     
  2. kuhlkid Member Member

    Preventing bloat has a lot to do with what the fish are eating--what kinds of food do you use?
     

  3. XenoMarc Member Member

    I feed them small pellets that fit in their mouths and they also seem to nibble on the brine shrimp wafers I feed to my cories.
     
  4. Floundering_Around Well Known Member Member

    Dropsy has many causes, most of them can be prevented with clean water
     

  5. kuhlkid Member Member

    So it sounds like you use mostly dried food, which is a cheap and convenient staple! I'd recommend adding some fresh veggies to their diet as well, to help them pass the dried food easily. What I do is also very cheap, and doesn't take long--buy a fresh zucchini, cut it into small parts, and blanche it to disinfect. I then put in two or three pieces, ~3/4" each, in the tank at a time, to divide attention and minimize aggression. What doesn't get used immediately can get put in a bag in the freezer! To weigh the pieces down, get some rubber bands and stainless steel nuts at your local hardware store. After around 24 hours, if they haven't eaten everything, take out what's left to prevent it making a mess of your tank. I try to do this around once a week, so just one zucchini goes a long way! This will help with their digestive health in the long run, especially for your pleco, who needs a lot of green things to much on.

    This is also really good to be aware of--bloat can come from bacterial infections, injuries, and more. Keeping your water clean and watching your fish closely are always important! And any time you actually do see something suspicious, sites like this one will be on standby to help you diagnose :)