Drip device for baking soda needed

FrogLegged

Member
Hi all
I like raising my KH with Baking Soda and would like to find a way to slowly introduce solutions into the tank. I don't know if there is a product that would do this, where you say, fill some reservoir with a solution and it drips through a line at a slow interval into the tank until the reservoir is empty. If anyone knows of such a device, it would be much appreciated. I think it would be easier on the fish (than just dumping 1/4 tsp in at a time) and I wouldn't have to baby the process. Thank you!
 

Betta'sAnonymous

Member
The first thing that springs to mind is an IV machine, but that would be super pricey.
 

mattgirl

Member
Instead of doing this have you looked into putting some crushed coral in your tank to stabilize your kh instead of baking soda? Instead of constantly having to add baking soda it just sits in your filter doing its job. With it you have no ups and downs. You should just have a constant level.
 
  • Thread Starter

FrogLegged

Member
Sounds good to me! I'm using a sponge filter, though. Can I just put the crushed coral in a mesh bag and drop it in and if so, how much should I use for a 10 gallon?
 

mattgirl

Member
FrogLegged said:
Sounds good to me! I'm using a sponge filter, though. Can I just put the crushed coral in a mesh bag and drop it in and if so, how much should I use for a 10 gallon?
That would work but I would try to situate the mesh bag so the water being pulled into or coming out of the sponge filter will help to disperse the carbonate dissolving from the coral and helping to mix it throughout the tank. Start out with about 1/2 cup for this size tank.

You can add more if needed. You are not going to add too much as it will just raise the level to a certain number and no more. I can't tell you what that number is going to be. It depends on the chemistry of your water. You may be able to just mix it in with your substrate though. Depends on your substrate. If it is black sand or gravel the white may really stand out.

I do have to ask though. Why are you having to raise your pH? What is it straight from the tap and also what is it in the tank? Quite often stable is much better than a specific number unless you have fish that have to have a specific level.
 
  • Thread Starter

FrogLegged

Member
mattgirl said:
I do have to ask though. Why are you having to raise your pH? What is it straight from the tap and also what is it in the tank? Quite often stable is much better than a specific number unless you have fish that have to have a specific level.
Well, I really don't need to raise pH, just KH - but the pH will go up as a side effect and my reasoning behind raising the KH is that I am using RO water that has been re-mineralized for GH and basically has 0 KH. So, to prevent uncontrollable swings in pH, especially since I'm using CO2 and I want to control how much the CO2 brings down a starting pH during the photoperiod for the plants, I would like to keep the KH around 3-4. I have 5 red wagtail platys in the tank, too and am not comfortable with a pH change of over 1, from lowest to highest pH in a 24 hour time. Baking soda also raises KH and the pH increase was negligible for me. But...if crushed coral works too, I'd rather do that. Straight from the tap, it is liquid rock and 7.8-8.0 pH or higher and unpredictable due to the way my city processes water. After RO, it is about 7 pH. Then I bring it down to about 6.3 with CO2 during the photoperiod, but without KH being higher, the swings are less predictable. When the CO2 injection is done for the day, it goes back up to a reliable 7.0 - if the KH is right.

Edit: I do use a small water pump for water circulation and could place the mesh bag right in front of the output for maximum dispersal, too.
 

mattgirl

Member
FrogLegged said:
Well, I really don't need to raise pH, just KH - but the pH will go up as a side effect and my reasoning behind raising the KH is that I am using RO water that has been re-mineralized for GH and basically has 0 KH. So, to prevent uncontrollable swings in pH, especially since I'm using CO2 and I want to control how much the CO2 brings down a starting pH during the photoperiod for the plants, I would like to keep the KH around 3-4. I have 5 red wagtail platys in the tank, too and am not comfortable with a pH change of over 1, from lowest to highest pH in a 24 hour time. Baking soda also raises KH and the pH increase was negligible for me. But...if crushed coral works too, I'd rather do that. Straight from the tap, it is liquid rock and 7.8-8.0 pH or higher and unpredictable due to the way my city processes water. After RO, it is about 7 pH. Then I bring it down to about 6.3 with CO2 during the photoperiod, but without KH being higher, the swings are less predictable. When the CO2 injection is done for the day, it goes back up to a reliable 7.0 - if the KH is right.

Edit: I do use a small water pump for water circulation and could place the mesh bag right in front of the output for maximum dispersal, too.
Gotcha In this case we can hope the crushed coral will do what the baking soda is doing but it will be constant.

That sounds like the best place for the bag of CC.
 
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