Downsizing Betta

TarielBlu

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My betta curently lives in a 5 gallon tank with a snail and I was wondering is it would be ok is I split the tank and added another betta. Would downsizing affect my betta? Is there a way to make the transition easier?
 

Kiks

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5 gallons is considered the minimum for bettas, so I'd not do that.
 

aussieJJDude

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5 gallons is considered the minimum for bettas, so I'd not do that.
It really depends on the individual, many consider a 2.5g that absolute min. I personally think that as long as you can maintain a healthy environment for the fish, the size of tank is irrelevant.


To make the transition a little easier, get a divider that isnt entirely see through so that way the bettas cant see eachother and get stressed. Another good idea is to quarantine the new fish to ensure it's not carrying pathogens that will make your current fish sick.

Otherwise, it's pretty much the same type of care...
 

Fanatic

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I really would advise against dividing a five gallon, although space might not be too bad, a divided five gallon would have an odd shape and just doesn't have enough horizontal space for the betta to swim.
 

Kiks

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It really depends on the individual, many consider a 2.5g that absolute min. I personally think that as long as you can maintain a healthy environment for the fish, the size of tank is irrelevant.


To make the transition a little easier, get a divider that isnt entirely see through so that way the bettas cant see eachother and get stressed. Another good idea is to quarantine the new fish to ensure it's not carrying pathogens that will make your current fish sick.

Otherwise, it's pretty much the same type of care...
I don't see how the size of the tank could ever be irrelevant whether or not you can maintain a healthy environment. Sure, keeping the water pristine and stable is important, but so is swimming space. If all that matters is good parameters you could just keep any smaller sized fish in a cup.
 

koiboy

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Bettas can survive smaller, but many fish keepers would discourage that. It's like keeping them in a jail cell. Yes they can survive, but its better to give them a decent house
 

aussieJJDude

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I don't see how the size of the tank could ever be irrelevant whether or not you can maintain a healthy environment. Sure, keeping the water pristine and stable is important, but so is swimming space. If all that matters is good parameters you could just keep any smaller sized fish in a cup.
Cause the size of the tank isn't an indication of a healthy environment? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ True, they often do go hand in hand, but just cause you have a sizable tank doesn't always mean it's the right choice.

IMO, it's better for someone to keep a betta in a 1g bowl/tank (or even 2.5g) that's has suitable water quality (aka cycled or preform regular water changes), at the right temperature, feeds the right food and has a stimulating environment that's suitable to the betta compared to keeping it in a 20g that's not cycled, has decor that's not suitable, wrong temperature, feeds the wrong food or has wrong tankmates. Size of the tank isn't really an issue to me anymore, as I tend to focus on what the tank has to offer. Are minimum requirements met. If yes, good job.

Stemming from that, I think it's more responsible for someone that actually knows what they are doing to keep 5 bettas in undersized setups then it is for someone that has 1 betta in a large setup that's not having the fishes best interest at heart or fails to understand their pet.

Trust me when I say this, I use to be one of those that had to have x, y and z for a fish to live. For some, I still support that. But for others, not so much. Betta tank size is one of those things to me that if one can have:
- a filter of some descript
- heating the tank (or is at least naturally warm, aka in a tropical environment away from direct sun)
- a hiding place
- something for them to swim around/through (like plants)
- an open space at least 2-3x the body length for the fish to swim around in any horizontal manner

Then it's good enough for me to keep the betta healthy.


Likewise, some bettas simply arent active, disabled of some kind which limits their ability in a larger tank or enjoy a spacious tank. While it may not fit the majority, for some, the case is that a smaller is better - or betta.

So yeah. I do agree with your last statement to a degree. (Even though we are all aware how far fetched it is, with its slight dig....) if you can keep a cup of water, with good parameters and able to simulate the betta then I don't see why you couldn't. Certainly wouldn't reccomend it to a new hobbyists, or someone that has very little idea about nano aqua... but it can be done.

Fish keeping is a science (or some could say an art), not a mathematical equation. You can't apply one ridiculous blanket rule and expect it to work in all scenarios like some do - aka bettas MUST have a 5g tank or larger. It's like saying since one person had water quality issues with using tap water, then ever single one of us on this forum will have problems with tap. (Or someone had issues with keeping a betta with plants, doesn't mean we all will). Idk if it's the realist in me, but there's more to keeping fish tank worrying about tank size. Sure it's a factor, but it's not the entire issue IMO.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 

Kiks

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Cause the size of the tank isn't an indication of a healthy environment? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ True, they often do go hand in hand, but just cause you have a sizable tank doesn't always mean it's the right choice.

IMO, it's better for someone to keep a betta in a 1g bowl/tank (or even 2.5g) that's has suitable water quality (aka cycled or preform regular water changes), at the right temperature, feeds the right food and has a stimulating environment that's suitable to the betta compared to keeping it in a 20g that's not cycled, has decor that's not suitable, wrong temperature, feeds the wrong food or has wrong tankmates. Size of the tank isn't really an issue to me anymore, as I tend to focus on what the tank has to offer. Are minimum requirements met. If yes, good job.

Stemming from that, I think it's more responsible for someone that actually knows what they are doing to keep 5 bettas in undersized setups then it is for someone that has 1 betta in a large setup that's not having the fishes best interest at heart or fails to understand their pet.

Trust me when I say this, I use to be one of those that had to have x, y and z for a fish to live. For some, I still support that. But for others, not so much. Betta tank size is one of those things to me that if one can have:
- a filter of some descript
- heating the tank (or is at least naturally warm, aka in a tropical environment away from direct sun)
- a hiding place
- something for them to swim around/through (like plants)
- an open space at least 2-3x the body length for the fish to swim around in any horizontal manner

Then it's good enough for me to keep the betta healthy.


Likewise, some bettas simply arent active, disabled of some kind which limits their ability in a larger tank or enjoy a spacious tank. While it may not fit the majority, for some, the case is that a smaller is better - or betta.

So yeah. I do agree with your last statement to a degree. (Even though we are all aware how far fetched it is, with its slight dig....) if you can keep a cup of water, with good parameters and able to simulate the betta then I don't see why you couldn't. Certainly wouldn't reccomend it to a new hobbyists, or someone that has very little idea about nano aqua... but it can be done.

Fish keeping is a science (or some could say an art), not a mathematical equation. You can't apply one ridiculous blanket rule and expect it to work in all scenarios like some do - aka bettas MUST have a 5g tank or larger. It's like saying since one person had water quality issues with using tap water, then ever single one of us on this forum will have problems with tap. (Or someone had issues with keeping a betta with plants, doesn't mean we all will). Idk if it's the realist in me, but there's more to keeping fish tank worrying about tank size. Sure it's a factor, but it's not the entire issue IMO.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
I appreciate your will to debate things I've never said, such as the size of the tank being an indication of a healthy environment, while calling my statement far fetched - and apparently "we" all think it's far fetched.
I'm not trying to apply "one ridiculous blanket rule" - I'm simply stating what I believe is important when it comes to keeping a fish happy and healthy.

Have a nice day, I'm not gonna discuss this further with you.
 

Lucy

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Hi TarielBlu welcome to FishLore!!

Let's not stray from the original question everyone. Here is the original question:

My betta curently lives in a 5 gallon tank with a snail and I was wondering is it would be ok is I split the tank and added another betta. Would downsizing affect my betta? Is there a way to make the transition easier?
Some consider 5g minimum others may say 2.5. One thing to consider is stress. Often bettas see each other as a threat which may keep them at high alert.
Keeping stress down helps keep their immune system healthy.
 

Feohw

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Most people say that 2.5g is the absolute mimimum, while 5g is the recommended minimum. I definitely would't keep a betta in anything smaller than 5g, the bigger it is the better. Obviously the size of the tank means little if the parameters are off, but space is very important in my opinion. I wouldn't even put my partially blind betta in smaller than 5g. Obviously everyone is different. In smaller tanks parameters can sway quicker than in larger tanks. There is also the whole issue with the divider - which imo is not a very pretty thing to see in an aquarium.
 

Ladyglo

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Regardless of minimal tank sizes, your Betta is used to the 5 gallon. IMO, if you really want the second Betta, I would try him out the smaller space first, before buying another fish. I had a Betta in a 5 gallon, but had to remove him for a week to repair a problem with the tank. I placed him in a 2.5 gallon, with his favorite stuff, and he was miserable. He wouldn't swim or look at me, barely ate, he just hung there all day. When the week was up, and I put him back into his 5 gallon, the guy swam to every corner of that tank and literally did somersaults he was so happy. Good luck with whatever you decide!
 

aussieJJDude

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Hi TarielBlu welcome to FishLore!!

Let's not stray from the original question everyone. Here is the original question:



Some consider 5g minimum others may say 2.5. One thing to consider is stress. Often bettas see each other as a threat which may keep them at high alert.
Keeping stress down helps keep their immune system healthy.
Sorry Lucy. But I always assumed the individual I quoted was someone that needed further clarification on why I thought as that. Prehaps removal of the inflammatory posts to another topic?

But I do agree on the stress. A well divided tank should greatly minimize stress, as long as the fish cant see eachother visually.
 

Lucy

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Sorry Lucy. But I always assumed the individual I quoted was someone that needed further clarification on why I thought as that. Prehaps removal of the inflammatory posts to another topic?
While parts of both posts could be useful to the OP (and those searching for answers on the same topic, it seemed be headed in the wrong direction. Thus my reply
 

Erupto35

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Has anyone ever seen a tank divided diagonally? Sounds like a theoretical compromise of above discussion of volume vs horizontal distance but no idea if it's done often (since I'm basically clueless)

Given the price of another 5g vs rigging up a divider, may even be similarly priced and easier to get another 5g if you wanted the other betta. But again, that's based on my own experience of needing room to screw up.

Really was just curious if diagonal division was a thing, I feel like that'd look neat. Never used one meself.
 

Galathiel

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A lot depends on the individual betta. I had a betta in a 2.5 gallon for over a year. At the end, he didn't move at all, but hovered in place. The dimensions of a 2.5 (and would be just the same issue in a divided 5 gallon) leads to a lack of lateral swimming area. I moved him to a 6.6 gallon bookshelf (which is as long as a 20 gallon, but only 8-9 inches tall) and it was night and day. He swam around constantly, back and forth, all day patrolling his territory.
 

KellyLvLady

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buy a 10 gallon and split it. I am not a fan of under 5 gallons. took me some time to realize why my betta was always trying to jump out of his 3.5 gallon. then the lightbulb went on, lol. Got him a 10 gallon and he grew huge!

My newest. A samurai, plakat is in a 20 long with some snails. He rules that tank. patrols back and forth. lol
 

saddleupjep

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I would never go smaller than a 5 gallon for an adult male Betta. And that's from someone who started with a tiny bowl.
 
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