Double Tailed Common Goldfish?

Oliver T.
  • #1
Is there such thing as a fancy goldfish that looks exactly like a common goldfish except double tailed? Thanks
 
Goldiemom
  • #2
I had 62 fancy goldfish fry and one had a single tail so I’m sure It’s possible.
 
mjfromga
  • #3
Not really. The nature of fancy goldfish is that they're not supposed to be shaped like commons. The closest thing you'll get is probably the Wakin or WatonaI varieties. They're not shaped EXACTLY like Commons, but they're as close as fancies come to Commons.
 
aussieJJDude
  • #4
Wakins are commons in shape but with a double tail - exactly what you described. They regarded as fancies, much like a shubinkin is considered a fancy.

So yeah, you can.
 
goldface
  • #5
Wakins, if I remember, were the first double-tailed goldfish. The lineage is pretty straightforward. It started with the funa or gibel carp. The hibuna (common) came next and the wakin after that. Therefore, the closest thing you’re looking for are likely them.
 
rainbowsprinkles
  • #6
This is a double tail ‘feeder’ from petsmart
Image1537272245.039884.jpg
 
Goldiemom
  • #7
I think flukes just happen sometimes. Like my one single tailed fry out of 62 fancies. No inbreeding, just a fluke.
 
Goldiemom
  • #8
Is there such thing as a fancy goldfish that looks exactly like a common goldfish except double tailed? Thanks
Oliver T, Do you have one or are you looking for one?
 
Oliver T.
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
I would love to have one in my pond I'm building, but I don't know if they can live with live bearers
 
rainbowsprinkles
  • #10
They get big and will eat anything that fits in the mouth
 
TheeLadyG
  • #11
Keep in mind most fancy features are spontaneous mutations that bred true and are farther pushed to the limits by intensive breeding practices. Those spontaneous mutations still occur! Pretty much anything is possible
 
rainbowsprinkles
  • #12
I think flukes just happen sometimes. Like my one single tailed fry out of 62 fancies. No inbreeding, just a fluke.

I’m still sad you lost that one..
 
mjfromga
  • #13
A Shubunkin is just a calico Comet. It's a single tailed fish. It isn't considered a fancy goldfish .
 
aussieJJDude
  • #14
A Shubunkin is just a calico Comet. It's a single tailed fish. It isn't considered a fancy goldfish .
Some people do consider them as such. Which is fair enough, considering that the strain - even the 'solid gold' - isn't found in the wild.

They not fancy in terms of being round and having odd features with a double tail, but still considered a fancy due to having unique markings.

Edit: you're talking about the american shubinkin, there's also london and bristol varieties which are different again!
 
mjfromga
  • #15
The London is basically a calico COMMON. And of course the Bristol is a rare type with a huge heart shaped tail. Even the Commons could be called fancies by your definition of the unnatural color making a fish fancy. None of what we see in our stores as far as goldfish exist in the wild. The hibuna is the closest thing to wild as modern day goldfish get. And a properly bred Wakin shouldn't have the exact body of a Common. A single tailed fish born from fancies is called a Nymph. They're usually culled by breeders as junk fish but I quite like them.
 
goldface
  • #16
For something a bit more exotic, Jikins are lovely. You’ll likely have to pay a little more for it though. There is another variety that’s Common-like in shape which I can’t recall the name of now, but goes for even more I believe. Personally, I’d love to get my hands on both a London and Bristol Shubunkin.
 
aussieJJDude
  • #17
The London is basically a calico COMMON. And of course the Bristol is a rare type with a huge heart shaped tail. Even the Commons could be called fancies by your definition of the unnatural color making a fish fancy. None of what we see in our stores as far as goldfish exist in the wild. The hibuna is the closest thing to wild as modern day goldfish get. And a properly bred Wakin shouldn't have the exact body of a Common. A single tailed fish born from fancies is called a Nymph. They're usually culled by breeders as junk fish but I quite like them.

I'm literally quoting what other people think... I've heard people over the years say they think shubunkin is variety, and is equally fancy as the rest of them. In a way I do agree, since they are far enough removed from wild stock to be considered a fancy.. Unlike the 'solid golds' - which I already mentioned that it is not typical wild coloration - but the wild ancestors did have some offspring that had small/large patches of orange, and was selective bred until they were considered the equivalent of the modern day hibuna... So yeah, they can 'somewhat' be considered not part of the grouping of fancy goldies.

Every wakin I've seen and even breeder quality is considered to be the body shape of a common, so I'm a little surprised with your answer.

So to summarise - and better put across my view, whether correct or not - goldfish varieties like shubunkins, wakins and comets can be considered a type of fancy goldfish. We don't normally label some as such (at least on this forum), but I think one can do so without much issue. I personally consider wakins fancy enough to be considered such, and other two - I'm on the fence.
 
aussieJJDude
  • #18
For something a bit more exotic, Jikins are lovely. You’ll likely have to pay a little more for it though. There is another variety that’s Common-like in shape which I can’t recall the name of now, but goes for even more I believe. Personally, I’d love to get my hands on both a London and Bristol Shubunkin.
From what I have read, Jikins are basically wakins that's white with a red 6 point system - lips, fins and sometimes gills... Wakins don't have this point system, but visually... the same fish.
 
mjfromga
  • #19
I'm literally quoting what other people think... I've heard people over the years say they think shubunkin is variety, and is equally fancy as the rest of them. In a way I do agree, since they are far enough removed from wild stock to be considered a fancy.. Unlike the 'solid golds' - which I already mentioned that it is not typical wild coloration - but the wild ancestors did have some offspring that had small/large patches of orange, and was selective bred until they were considered the equivalent of the modern day hibuna... So yeah, they can 'somewhat' be considered not part of the grouping of fancy goldies.

Every wakin I've seen and even breeder quality is considered to be the body shape of a common, so I'm a little surprised with your answer.

So to summarise - and better put across my view, whether correct or not - goldfish varieties like shubunkins, wakins and comets can be considered a type of fancy goldfish. We don't normally label some as such (at least on this forum), but I think one can do so without much issue. I personally consider wakins fancy enough to be considered such, and other two - I'm on the fence.

I guess it is all down to personal preference. I like the round fat fishies. To me, those are true fancies. Tail types I guess can make a fancy as well. Long flowing tails are unnatural and slow the fish down and hinder them. The tail of a basic COMET does look quite fancy, as does the color of a basic Shubunkin. Commons can swim circles around Comets. Oh well. I like all goldfish anyway.
 
goldface
  • #20
From what I have read, Jikins are basically wakins that's white with a red 6 point system - lips, fins and sometimes gills... Wakins don't have this point system, but visually... the same fish.
Jikins also have a different tail type called a peacock tail, as well as considered relatively weak or delicate compared to Wakins. I guess you could say they are more Wakin-like than Common. Some may also have a more pronounced hump as they were created using Ryukin bloodline. I believe they are considered stable and breed true. I think that should constitute them as being a separate variety from the Wakin.
 

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